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Full text of "CU Amiga Magazine Issue 102"

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WHwIrWEMAltlHftrtwm X! 



CONTENTS 




Extensive Amiga news from 
Europe, plus Stateside too. 



Editorial 



^/P\ The astute will have noticed a subtle audio theme 

about this issue. It's time to move on from the old 
jj* __ days of four channel 8-bit sound into the world of pro- 
fessional audio. Find out how, starting on page 32. 
m^A^^^M Meanwhile we take a new look the Video Toaster, 
^^^^^^^* which is now available cheaper than ever Rounding off 
the features we've got Andrew Korn to unravel the web of confu- 
sion surrounding that bombshell from Amiga Inc with an update on 
what's happen since then. Not to mention all of this... 
Tony Horgan, Editor 



Advertisers Index 



Screen Scene 



Game Reviews 

42 Genetic Species 

46 Foundation 

Tips Central 

49 Adventure Helpline 

50 Quake Special 

52 Explorer 2260 Diary 



Tech Scene 



Srinijjluurift Of ■» SI 




"Nl « l*»lfr M ^ ml » I H » 



Cover disks 



14 Super CD-ROM 25 

The audio theme extends to an enor- 
mous collection of sound and music 
related software on the CD, including 
Samplitude CD and an audio track. It's 
another 100% full dfsc too! 

18 Cover disks 

A fully working version of Samplitude 
CD is here along with an exclusive 
demo of [he new Sound Probe r 
backed up by Wolf Pac. 



AMIGA 



D-RDM2 




m 




54 


SoundProbe 2.0 


56 


Samplitude Opus 


58 


Eyetech CDPIus SE 


61 


VDC2O0p Digicam 


62 


Siamese V2.1 


63 


Scan Magic 


64 


Cat weasel Mkll 


66 


PD.net 


68 


PD.post 


70 


Art Gallery 


72 


User Groups 


Workshop 


76 


Digital Art 


78 


Amiga C Programming 


82 


Emulation 


84 


Net God 


85 


Surf of the Month 


86 


Wired World 


88 


Scala MM300 


90 


Reviews Index 


95 


Back Issues 


96 


QbA 


99 


A to Z 


100 


Backchat 


103 


Subscriptions 


104 


Points of View 


106 


Techno Tragedies 




Features 



CONTENTS 



23 Confused? You won't be 

Recenl developments from Amiga Inc and third 
parties have caused a whole lot of confusion. 
Here's what's really going on. 

28 Video Toaster 

Now cheaper than ever, NewTek's Video Toaster 
looks like winning some new friends outside of 
the US at last. But what exactly is it? 



iSil 



Cliffi flVf, I 



CiidasEll ? Ydi wait hi.. 



32 Audio Magic 

There's so much going on with Amigg audio at 
the moment that we just had to bring you up to 
speed with all the latest exciting developments. 



Audio Mijic n 







E-Zlrttt 

X 




* ; $Xfi£i 







v 



EyetBck COPtus St SI 








AUGUST 1998 - CONTENTS 



DfPUTV EDITOR 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 

STAFF VTRFTER 

TECHNICAL CONSULTANT 

US CDFFKSPUNDEKT 

GIMME*. BOY 

NAUGHTY ART DIRECTOR 

CONTRIBUTORS 



FBOTOCTtflPHV 

SCITEJ MANAGER 

IT SUPPORT 

SYSTEMS MANAGER 



Editorial 

EDITOR TtifHirjli 

Russell C«i 
Rictiard Diuninnni 
John XenntaV 

J«a<i Ctnpton 

SeshH M, 

Bern Mutef. 

Sjar Malnistn, Noil Balkwick. 

-Jjsoi NulHice. live Stint. 

Chrii Green. Junalkau Brooker, 

Dkunas TreiH. The W»rM 

FiHiadrf 

Ben Jemiag; 

Sank Best 

Haul Williams 
Smk-JaM Lewcf 



Advertising, Marketing h Management 

PUBLIiSHEF Andy McYiIiIe 



AOVTRTISING MANAGER 

MARKETING EXECIFNI/E 

GROUF PRODUCTION MANAGER 

Affl PHDDUCTiaFICXECVTIVE 

ADVERTISING- ASSISTANT 
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MiriiiHi Mailers 
Zbe Wkarnsk)' 
Embii Mifori 

N alas ha Gtnrqp 
Annabel Green 
Ri»h<irt hlcBuidn 




CU Amiga Magazine 

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ibw ill iitp jutusl ffi&A . Irani d ta mm d m»i tiaiatt Bay taut IE f wnirri if 

itPH Tib m (H I is i: binkdmL i'lin jmiji.cn.uk ur + fl .:ru«|un.uk. 



PC REVIEWS: Hihi'm «nllii 1 1 ps|iw ttif m'n inwd il 5' mi '« i PD lihjrr i"d « 
bh yau it*i n?Knri ■ 1U KfHl pipes serf *■* li HI SUBMISSIONS. CJ Anil 
Miiinc 37-39 MiaWoir. IiIe of Dogs. lnndm. 11 * Hi 



UdERTISIIC lit AMIHSINE PROBLEMS H th wri li ifitnui ■ tU A»fi Hj|«m 
|lm tttiiKi tliiuau HiiIiii m lit item htkatni ubui nd MMnwi Itatd 
1 trim N m Kir i vht murfiii in iteniismii n U) '» V Unsm 



COHR B IS* PR QBLtHS II r»j Inn liiln turn cist tlis «ifii ir mat yw lok 
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CUMPETITIONS n*jiwA»lWw Himw II Hill I II V fim M «i *«« Mfp> *■! 
■iiriiscMliWistuiiltbddptacid.anjMltlkiisKtni^HidbMltki.iCllie 
BiulMta! ln*a rtimnifljrt ■*! r.m |i40d ■Iinmniii ipims nr.nh ittqttl h 

»« nlti wrtdianl hi ate ll law 

SICK ISSUES. Half- US HSdjid li luiaMhY IS till nun UEitictHM Iik W 
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■ tut, titkbH SkHt, Uinil Kiitiiaigl IF! I #7 * PI IU -IIS 3St . 

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K UMT Lhjh I HL Ik lift if to nan ay b r^nindain^ Httif ihAaci 
ndhMul. w ttH BttHk lal Mpajt tntln iinns*i ti M JiWiilir Ct4i ld>4 iHiik li 
afyiiftl i twaatdia aaaan nd uf Ml ii ItpuiM cislnliKd o - sikj «• mliwi iir 

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nap bbubbi faaab M bhhm Ita NajHil tHMiidi, k( cant ir Mi najnikli I* la) 

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PftlaTEIV IN THE LHNTEt IINtMM RV SdliTXEFW PHNT HO DFTSLT. PQOLI. 
Cmf R [HSK ANQ LD R'JH DUPLOHQit BY DISXxnESt 



ABCJulv-DBCBmker199TZUSI 

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PC880E External Drive .£39,95 
XL 1.76MB Ext. Drive . .£65.95 
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Backup 520MB onto a 4 Hr tape 

Video Backup Phono £20 

video Backup Scart ..... .£20 



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3.5" 4.3GB £169.95 

3.5" HD Stack Cable . . ,£12.95 
External SCSI 2,1GB . £249.95 
I ntern a I S CSI 2. 1 G B .. £1 99 . 95 



Includes Turbo Print LE & cable 
Epson 600 1440Dpi col £225.95 
Epson 800 1440Dpi col £289.95 

Turbo Print 6 £39.95 

Turbo Print LE £25.95 




<%, # 



INC, WHIPPET 




Inc. Surf Squirrel 





Awahp Winning 





Power Graphic Tablet £1 59.95 

Zip RAM per MB £16.95 

Breathless 3D game , . ,£15,95 
Big Red Adventure CD .£19.95 
Heavy Duty PSU 200 w £65.95 
Official Amiga Mouse . . .£9.95 
Games joypad , £14,95 



Epson A4 flatbed scanner 
24-bit colour scanning 
Greyscale and line art modes 
OCR software available £20 

Epson GT-5000 £219,95 

Epson GT-5000 + s/w .£249.95 




Amiga Mouse: 



£9.95 




w:v 



J 



A400O/T2O0 High density drive 

controller 

Allows you to connect any PC 

drive 
Cat weasel Mk2 (Zorro) £49.95 
PC Floppy Drive £20.00 

Ik high speed serial 
Power Port Junior .... .£39,95 

1 x parallel, 2 x serial 

Power Port Plus .... .£69,95 

2 ^parallel, 1 x serial 

Power Port Z3 £65.95 

A2000/4000 only Zorro ll/lll 




Includes interface and software 
Colour scanner is ACA 24-bit 
400dpi 

Powerscan b/w ,£59.95 

Powerscan colour/OCR £99.95 
Scanner OCR software . . . £20 



GVP HC-8 SCSI int £99.95 

GVP Guru ROM v6 £49.95 

DSS B sound sampler , £59.95 

4MB RAM module £59,95 

16MB RAM module . . .£99.95 
A1200 SCSI interface , .£5995 



tv 







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>*>* 



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Inc. ROM chip, software and 

manual 

A1 200/3000 3.1 OS £45.95 

A500/6O0/20O0 3 1OS £39.95 

A40O0 3.1OS £45,95 

A500/600/2000 3.1 chip £25.95 
A1200/4000 3,1 chip . .£29 95 

Original keyboard and interface 
Original Keyboard , . ■ £40.00 



AMtCiA KEYBOARD 



£40.00 



IDNE FAX 01234 B554DD 

D1234 B515DD 



UNIT 82A SINGER WAY 
KEMPSTON MK42 7PU 






7 



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20.00 



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40.00 



Include* 200 watt PSU 
PC Keyboard 
PC Keyboard Interface 
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All screws, port labels and leads 
Power Tower 1 £149.95 



Powef Tower and keyboard 
A 1200 main board 
1230 33MHz, 8MB RAM, 
33MHz FPU accelerator card 
Floppy disk drive 
3.1 Workbench 
3.1 Manuals 
Wordworth 4.55E 
Turbocalc 3 5 Spreadsheet 
Datastore 1.1 Database 
Photogenic 1 .2SE 
Personal Paint 6.4/Organiser 1.1 
PinbaH Mania AVizz games 
Power Tower 2 £399.95 



Power Tower and keyboard 

A1200 main board 

1230 40MHz- 16MB RAM 

accelerator card 

24x IDE CD-ROM 

2.1 C8 hard drive 

4 way JDE interface/IDE Fix 97 

Floppy disk drive 

3.1 Workbench 

3.1 Manuals 

Wordworth 4.5SE 

Turbocalc 3.5 Spreadsheet 

Datastore 1.1 Database 

Photogenic 1 .25E 

Personal Paint 6.4/Qrganiser LI 

Pinball Mama/Wizz games 
Power Tower 3 ..... ,£629.95 
As above hut wSth 1240 16MB RAM 
accelerator card add . . . .£149.95 






4 Way IDE Buffered Interface 

IDE Fix 97 Software 
Fully Registered 

Interface+IDE Fix £30.95 

lnterface4A4000 IDE Fix £25.95 



Power TOWER 1 



£1 49.95 



•Rare CD-ROM drnfj lot the Power TDwef 



2.5" Cable 
3.5" 3- Way 40-pin 
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£9.95 




120MB Floppy drive 

Cable, IDE Fix 97, 120MB disk 

4 Way IDE buffered interface 

US 120 External £149.95 

L5120 Internal £129.95 

LSI20 Internal no IDE . .£95.95 
LSI 20 Disk £12.95 




Internal ZIP Drive 
Cable, IDE Fix 97 
Power Zip Tools 

100MB Zip disk 

4 Way IDE buffered interface 
Internal Zfp Drive . . . .£149.95 
External Zip Drive . . . .£169.95 



Zonro (Please call for information) , .£CALL 

Zorro III (Please call for information) £CALL 

PCMCIA V adaptor (allows Squirrel to be fitted internally) . .£19.95 

External audio port (for internal CD-ROM) £15.95 

SCSI-1 adaptor (internal 50-way pin header, ext, 25 way) . . .£19.95 
5CSI-II (micro high density connector, int. 50-way header 

external micro HD connector) . , .£25.95 

SCSI-Ill (3-way ultra wide int. connector, ext. micro HD con) £45,95 

SCSI-IK (7-way connector) ££9.95 

SCSI-Ill Terminator , , £39.95 

3- Way IDE ribbon cable (suitable For HD's, CD-ROM) .£9.95 

3-Way SCSI 50 pin header (for HD's, SCSI CD-ROM) £15.95 

PC Keyboard interface . , ,£29,95 

Printer switches, - in stock £caH 

25 Watt Speakers (inc. adaptor cable) £19.95 

260 Watt Speakers (inc adaptor cable) .£49.95 

200 Watt Subwoofer (inc. control box) £55,95 




or the Power Tower 
Suitable for ext. connection 

Up to 7 devices internal 
Fits Viper Mk5 or any other 

SCSI device for int. connection 

Int SCSI adaptor £19.95 



A1200 2MB 020 14.3MHz 

AGA Chipset 
Software 

Amiga Magfc Pack . . ,£199.95 



Amiga 1200 Magic Pack 

4MB RAM Card included 

Amiga Bundle ... 




£239.95 



Inc. cable and software 

3.5" 2.1GB £119.95 

3.5" 3.2GB £149.95 

3.5" 4.3GE £169.95 

3.5" HD Stack Cable . . £12,95 

Ideal for the Power Tower 



PHONE 



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OT234 S515DD 



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A2000 68030- 50MHz 

Upto 64MB RAM 

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Bare £169,95 

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Not PCMCIA Friendly 

IDE Buffered compatible 

33MHz inc. 33MHz FPU 

Compatible with IDE CD-ROM 
1230 Turbo 4MB ...,,. £59.95 
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A1 200 68040 Accelerator 
Apollo 1240 25MHz , . .£129.95 
Apollo 1240 40MHz , . ,£189,95 

A1200 68030 40 MH? 

Full MMU 
Vip«r MK2 Bare 
Viper MK2 8MB 
Viper MK2 16MB 
Viper MK2 32MB 
Viper MK2 64MB 



. .£79.95 
. £94.95 
,£104.95 
.£119.95 
.£199.95 



A500 Accelerator Card 
6802 0EC 33MHZ without MMU 
PCA FPU Socket 33MHz Only 
Space tor IDE 2.5" Hard Drive 
2 x 40-Pin CD-ROM/HO Socket 
8MB RAM On -board 
3.0 ROM inc. software 
Fat Agnus slot to fit mini-chip 
Viper 520CD £99.95 

4MB 72-pin SIMM £9.95 

8MB 72-pin SIMM f 1 5.00 

16MB 72-pin SIMM £25.00 

32MB 72-pin SIMM £40.00 

32MB Single side/Blizzard£89.9S 



A1 200 68060 Accelerator 
Apollo 1260 50MHz £269.95 
Apollo 1260 66MHz 019,95 
66MH2 is clocked up 






A1200 PowerPC Card 
60 3e PowerPC with 6SK CPU 
No SCSI, cannot be upgraded 
Up to 128MB RAM 
160MHz with 68O40/2S £249.95 
160MHz with 68060/50 £469.95 
200MHz With 68040/25 £299.95 
200MHz with 68060/50 £539.95 
240MHz with 68040/25 £35995 
240MHz with 68060/50 £609,95 



Same specs as above 
Includes DMA SCSI-2 in 

160MHz With 68040/25 
160MHz with 68060/50 
200MHz with 68040/25 
200MHz with 68060/ 50 
240MHz with 68040/25 
240MHz With 68060/ SO 



A3OO0/40OQ(T) PowerPC Card 

604e PowerPC with 68 K CPU 
Ultra wide SCSI-3, inc. FPU/MMU 

200MHz with 68040/25 £619.95 
200MHz With 68060/50 £779.95 
233MHz with 68040/25 £629,95 
233MHz With 6B060/50 £839.95 





Special Offer 1 


Special FPU prices 


when 


purchased with 


any 


accelerator ca 


rd. 


20MHZ(PLCC) . 


. . .£10 


33MHZ (PLCC) . - 


.£15 


40MHZ (PGA) . . . 


.. .£20 


50MHZ (PGA) . . . 


£29 



Complete with 2,5" IDE cable 
Install Software, Fitting Screws 
Partitioned and Formatted 
For the A1200 Computer 

1.3GB Hard Drive £129.95 

1.6GB Hard Drive £169.95 

2.1GB Hard Drive £189.95 



1 year on-site/2 year return to 
base warranty 

14" Digital ,..£124,95 

15" Digital £155.95 

17" Digital £319.95 



Official 1084s inc. speakers 

1084s Amiga Monitor . .£119.95 

(Monitor not snowrt) 



<^<* 



Z.5 HD\ 



£129.95 




A600 Accelerator Card 
6S030 33MHz Processor 
Upto 32MB RAM (1 x SIMM) 
FPU Included, PCM CIA friendly 

A600 0MB 33MHz £75.95 

A600 4MB 33MHz £85.95 

A600 8MB 33MHz fS5.95 

A600 16MB 33MHz . . . £115.95 
A600 32MB 33MHz . . „ .£150.95 

The outcome of two years develop- 
ment of a brand new game, which 
is going to be the first of a new 
breed of software, using interactive 

Full Motion Video at a high quality. 

Minimum Requirements; 
x6 CO-ROM Drive required 
68020 and FAST Memory 
SOMHj 68030 inc. BMB RAM 
(recommended) 

Graphic Card versions in development 





Game Feature*: 

Full Motion Video 
Rendered in Lightwave 
Several sub-games 
Huge game on 2 CD-ROMS 



PHONE ORDERS We. accept most major credit cards and are happy to help you with any queries- CHEQUIS/POSTAL ORDERS Ordering by cheque/PO please make payabte to POWLR COMPUTING 
LTD and Specify Which delivery is required. WARRANTY All Ptiwer products come with a 12 month warranty unless otherwise specified. TECHNICAL SUPPORT Help is fin hand with a full Technical 
Backup service mrfiich is provided for Power customers. MAIL OROEft PRICES AM prices listed are few the month of publicum wily, call lo confirm prices belore ordering. EXPORT ORDERS Most hems 
are available aiTax Free Prices tonon-K residents. Call to confirm prices, BFPO orders welcome. MAIL ORDER TERMS All prices include VAT. Specifications and prices are subject to change without 
■\H "rink'iikirks are acfcnu wledo^d . Alt orders in writing or by telephone will be accepted only subject to our terms and conditions oF trade, copies of which are available on request Please allow 

up to 7 days for ctiequei to clear before dispatching of the goods. 



CD-RDM TRDM 



£49.95 



For Al 200/600, A500 call 

4Way buttered interface + IDE'97 1 
Chaos Engine* 
Oscar/Diggers CD-ROM 1 
Power Supply Unit* 

24x Internal £49.95 

24* External £89,95 m 

3 2x Internal . £S9.9S *<L**J 

32x txtemal £99.95 

•Only comes witti External CD-ROM drives. Internal drive is aha suitable for Hie Power Tower 
lyiient - require! IDE irit*rf*ce and IDF Fiji '9 7 




External CD-ROM Drive 
Squirrel PCMCIA SCSI Interface 

Chaos Engine CD-ROM 
Oscar/ Diggers CD-ROM 

24x External CD-ROM £169 95 
3.2* External CD-ROM . £189.95 



Z4s EXT CD 



£169.95 



24x Internal CD-ROM . £89 95 
12x Internal CD ROM . . £99.95 

CD ROM comes with 3 way SCSI cable 



33x Ihi-r SCSI CD 



£99.95 




SLIMLINE EXT LTD 



£79.95 



Squirrel PCMCIA SCSI Interface 
External Power Supply Unit 
Chaos Engine CD-ROM 
Oscar/Diggers CD-ROM 



. . £10 
. . .£1 S 
. . .£20 
. . .£29 



4MB only not upgradable 

A1200 4MB RAM £39.95 

40MHZFPU ,.,..,£15 00 



MByte 3-2-bit zero wait state 

Fast-RAM 

Auto-recharge battery clock 

Socket for PGA FPU 68aB2 up to 

50MHz 

Fully auto-configuring Chip-RAM 

Fits easily into the trapdoor 

4MB PCMCIA compatible 

(not 8MB) 

4MB RAM . ,£45.95 

8MB RAM £55.95 

40MHZ FPU £15.00 



lnc.2MB zero wait state Fast RAM 
Auto -recharge battery dock 
Fits easliy into the CPU socket 
Fully Auto-configuring RAM 
increases the speed of your CDTV 
CDTV 2MB RAM £4995 





1MB of Chip RAM 
Mini Mega Chip ...... .£99.95 

Factory installed 2MB RAM 
Auto-recharge battery clock 
Fully auto-configuring RAM 
Works with all ASOO's WB1 3 and 
above 
A50O 2MB RAM £49.95 



1MB CHIP RAM 

Fits into the A500+ trapdoor 

Fully auto-configuring Chip RAM 

Works with ail A500+ 

A500 1MB CHIP RAM . . ,£19,95 



1MB CHIP RAM 
Auto-recharging battery clock 
Fits into the A60O trapdoor 
Fully auto-configuring Chip RAM 
Works with all A600 St A600HD 
A600 1MB CHIP RAM . . £24.95 






NAME ADDRESS. ........ 

POSTCODE .TEL No. 

rTEMS 




TOTAL (INC, DELIVERY) £...... CREDIT CARD No. 0000000000000000 

SICNATURE EXPIRY ISSUE No , 

DELIVERY (uk M«ii*id omy) 2-3 DAYS £5.00 NEXT DAY £8 SAT £1 5 j Northern Ireland £15 Monitor & Tender £8.00 O 



5US)MT TO PDQCKJCT AWitASILTY HUVUY TO ALL QTHtfl COUNTRIES £POA 



(UK CKNLT) 



PHONE 



FAX D1234 B554DD 



D1234 S515DD 



POWER COMPUTING LTD 
UNIT 82A SINGER WAY 
KEMPSTON MK42 7PU 







Power strikes back again with a faster E-IDE Controller fpr the Amiga 
1 200. If you have recently bought a Hard Drive and. you've probably 
realised that it is slower on your Amiga than on compatibles, Power 
can now solve that problem, thanks to the Power Flyer, a software 
and hardware solution which completely replaces the IDE controller of 
your Amiga 1 200. 

In PIO-4 mode it ii possible to reach a maximum speed of 
16.6MtVsec, Most drives will increas-e their transfer speed from 
2. 5 MB/ sec. to 7MB/sec. 

Tested with most accelerator cards, we found that the best performance 
is achieved with Apollo cards, (especially the 68060 66MHz ones) 

Up tp 4 E-IDE and ATARI 
devices can be connected 

Supports mode PlO-0, PIO-3 
and PIO-4 (A1200 standard 
controller supports PIO-0) 

Meets specifications for ATA-3 

and FastATA-2 



POWER FLYER 




£69.95 



A scan doubler works by doubling the vertical frequency of the Video 
compatible Amiga modes (ISKHz, Pal, NTSC and Euro 36). The signal 

generated will then be displayed by any standard SVGA monitor. 

The more expensive flickerfixer adds one extra feature to the ScanMagic. 
It eliminates the flickering from all interlaced Video compatible 
Amiga modes. 

Nobody can stop you anymore from buying a nice, inexpensive, PC 
compatible monitor (check our prices and models, all sizes are available). 



Doubles the Vertical frequency of the 

Amiga PAL, NTSC and Euro 36 video 

modes 

Allows you to use any standard VGA 

monitor with your Amiga 1200 and 

4O00 

Fits internally-easy installation 

VGA Adaptor included 

Pass through of all other modes 

Internal . , . , £54.95 

Internal inc. Flicker Fixer . . £99.95 
External with Flicker Fixer £99.95 
ScanMagic External ..... £69.95 
VGA Adaptor £15-00 




ScanMagic Int. 




d VDC200 



'The World of Amiga' show saw the launch of our most recent 

innovative product, Power Movie. 

This product is a long awaited tool for easy Full Motion Video editing. 
We anticipate that it will be popular with the developers of 
Multimedia projects or videogames and whoever needs to put 
together thousand-frame-long 3D rendered animations with 
synchronised soundtrack/sound F/X and in need of playing the 
resulting animation in real time straight rrom a hard drive or CD- 
ROM. Each frame can be in 256 



or HAM-8 colours and have a 
different palette. 

Power Computing is in the 
process of licensing PowerMovie 
according to its final use in order 
to keep its price down. Amiga 
enthusiasts will be able to buy 
the software with a cheaper licence for personal, strictly non- 
commercial use. Commercial usage requires a business licence for 
companies planning to use the software and the files it creates for 
commercial products i.e. video games, Multimedia, Info-Points, etc. 




*-m*r r* 
farm U-t - 



i- st 






_ „ „ L ; tu* .»— "^"! 



b535 



**##*■ 



- 1 * ^ tH ^ ¥-i™ i _a_) _lj> 

™* 1 I "KT" Y+i*Hl ( Jj.^j; 

l.1 ft ^3 m »>.. * _a_| _3 
■ 



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Power movie: 



£34.95 



COMMERCIAL (J5E 



£TBA 



Oliver Roberts, of F1GP Editor's 
fame, is the author of the Power 
DC, the software for Power's 
Digital cameras. 

VDC-100 Technical specifics!. 

Image/Video: 250,000 pixel CCD 

24-bit colour 

Resolution: 320 x 240 [standard), 

640 x 480 (high resolution) 

Memory Stores up to 20 images 

(20 standard, 10 high or a mixture 

of both) 

Real Time Video in Black & White 

(NTSC) 

Shutter Speed: 1/60 to 1/1 6000 

Focus Range: 10cm to infinity 

Power Supply; 4 A4 1 _5V batteries 

or DC Power adaptor 

VDO2Q0 Technical Specifications 
Image/Video: 470,000 pkd CCD 

24-bit col 

Resolution 320 X 240 (standard), 
640 x 480 (high resolution) 
4Jmm Colour TFT LCD monitor 



Memory; 2MB r stores up to 50 
images (standard mode} 
Compact flash memory slot 
Built-in flash 

Real Time Video in colour (Pal) 
Shutter Speed: 1/60 to 1/4000 
Focus Range; 250mm to infinity 



VDCIOD CAMERA 




VDC100 Camera £99.95 

VDC2QO Camera £199.95 

2MB Flash RAM (VDC200) £49.95 
4MB Flash RAM (VDC200) £TBA 
50 Alkaline Batteries . . .£25.95 



IDNE FAX U1234 B554QD 

D1234 S515DD 



POWER COMPUTING LTD 
UNIT 82A SINGER WAY 
KEMP5TON MK42 7PU 



VISA 



NEWS 



El 




BW3 



News from 
Motorola 



nBM and Motorola 
have announced that 
the partnership at 
their jointly funded 
PowerPC research 
centre is to end, The Somerset 
Centre in Austin, Texas will now be 
wholly owned and operated by 
Motorola. However, both companies 
have stated that they will continue to 
co-operate closely on advancing and 
marketing the PowerPC architecture, 
The PowerPC is important to both 
companies, especially in the area of 
embedded processors, a rapidly 
expanding sector of the market. The 
split between Motorola and IBM is 
not expected to have any adverse 
effect on the production of 
PowerPCs for desktop applications. 
In fact Motorola say that complete 
control at Somerset will permit sub- 
sidisation in this market. 

The fall out between IBM and 
Motorola is allegedly due to 
Motorola's proposed Altivec 
Technology. Altivec is a multimedia 



extension to the PowerPC architec- 
ture for high-bandwidth-data applica- 
tions - such as video/audio 
processing and networking, It is 
intended to compere with Intel's 
MMX extension to the Pentium but is 
far more radical, Altivec processors 
will feature a 1 28-bit wide vector 
unit, capable of operating in parallel 
with the FPU and ALU, and which 
will employ the SI MO paradigm 
iSirvgie Instruction Multiple Data) - 
an optimization making the process- 
ing of data streams possible with 
very few instructions and hence 
more efficient, The first processor 
incorporating Altivec is the G4, a 32- 
bit PowerPC chip scheduled for 
release in the first half of 1999. 

Motorola are also looking rather 
further into the future, They are said 
to be designing a ©4-bit processor 
which will rival the IA64 series, the 
next generation project from Intel 
and Hewlett-Packard. Ma details of 
this new chip have been released 
publically yet. 



Amiga gets new 
Web browser 



Work is under way on porting The 
Norwegian shareware browser 
Opera to the Amiga. Opera is 
currently available only on Windows 
platforms, where it is well-respected 
and popular, mainly due to its Amiga 
- like small size, efficiency and user 
friendliness. The decision to bring 
Opera to the Amiga is because of 
the tremendous response voiced by 
the Amiga community to Opera 
Software's Project Magic initiative - 
a survey of interest in the Opera 
browser for 'alternative' operating 
systems such as AmigaOS, BeOS 
and UNIX. 

The Amiga version of Opera is 
being produced by the UK-based 
company. Ramjam Consultants. Their 
project leader. Tim Corringham. 
believes there is room for Opera in 
the Amiga browser market because 
it offers more functionality and 



,,.„-■ 




stability than current browsers. The 
first release of this product is 
scheduled for December 98 and will 
be for Classic Amigas with WB3. 1 
and a minimum of 4MB of RAM, A 
PPC version is expected to follow. 
While pricing has not yet been 
confirmed,, it is expected to be com- 
parable to the PC version (currently 
USD 336 or about £20). 

More information can be found 
from Opera's web site St: 
http ; //www-Qperasofrware.co m/ , 




zoom 

Tho browsor thnt ttvi*? muck? for ucu! 



PPC Emulators are coming 



Microcode Solutions has finally 
released the PC version of the Fusion 
Macintosh emulator. That's not good 
news for Amiga users in and of itself, 
but it does finally Free up their 
resources to get back to work on 
Amiga projects. 

Power UP-com pa tible versions of 
both Microcode's PC* {PC-compati- 



ble) and Fusion (Macintosh) have 
been in progress for some time, but 
Microcode diverted all of its efforts to 
the completion of their first PC 
product. Fusion for MS-DOS. 

Mow that it has been released, 
Microcode have indicated that they 
are back to work on Amiga products, 
but declined to offer any potential 



release dates. 
Intriguing but uncon- 
firmed rumours have 
suggested that Mac OS 
8 for PPC contains 
enough of the original 
ROM code that Fusion 
PPC would be able to 
run Mac OS B out of 




the box, without requiring 
ROM images. We await 
Apple's opinion on the matter 
- if true, it could make total 
PowerMac solutions possible. 
Ybu can visit Microcode 
Soluttons's new website at 
http: ,' www. microcode- 
solution scorn 



miCROCODE SOLUTIOnS 



NEWS 



PPaint 6.4 free, 
PPaint 8 coming. 

PPaint 6,4, a version of the 
premiere bitmapped paint 
package that is barely eighteen 
months old, is being made freely 
distributable by the publisher's. 
Cloanto, To get your own fully 
functional, free copy of this 
package visit the biz/cloan 
directory on the Aminet- 

Cloanto are currently working 
on version 3 of PPaint, A maj.or re- 
write is to be undertaken to 
create more portable code, thus 
ensuring PPaint's future no matter 
what direction Amiga takes with 
any new OS. New features 
planned for this release include 
true-colour, layers, and improved 
animation facilities. 




CLOANTO 



Stop Press 

Cybervision PPC 
is here 

Just as this issue was going to 
press, we received confirmation 
that the Per media 2 based 
Cybervision PPC card from phase 
5 will be shipping about the time 
you art: reading this. These 2oV3d 
cards will come with an Amiga 
on Of Mn: Rave 3D library in 
both PPC and 68k versions. The 
BlizzardVision PPC version of the 
card (or A1 200 owners is 

i icted a month after the A4000 
Cybervision PPC version. 
At around the same time, phase 5 
will release version 46 of their 
PPC. Library for Cyberstorm PPC 
and, with a Flash ROM updater 
for Bliziard PPC. This version of 
the library contains various new 
features such as shared Mbrsry 
support. This will be (lie last 
version of the PPC, library in the 
immediate future. 



ICOA User Rep 
Selected 



In a landslide result, occasional CU contributor Hgrv Laser was selected 
to serve on the ICOA Steering Committee as one of five voting members. 
The other four have yet to be selected, but will be chosen in upcoming 
ICOA elections. Laser received 174 out Of 274 votes. 

Some have voiced concern that someone was elected to represent 
the world's users out of a list of three Americans and a tiny electorate, 
but the ICOA have said that Mure elections will be less rushed and give 
more of an opportunity for Arnigans world wide to become involved, 
According to ICOA, Laser's job for the next year is "to combine the roles 
of consumer advocate, opinion-gatherer, strategist and community 
liason" For more information on the ICOA. try: www.amiganet.org/icoa. 
The Amiga Zone can be visited at www.amigazone.com. 




Win Digital Grooves 



To celebrate the launch of their new 
CD. Audio Works are giving away 
five copies of Digital Grooves, a col- 
lection of 20 Amiga created tunes 

ranging from twinkly computer 
game soundtracks to moody 
computer game soundtracks, plus a 
few other bits and pieces along the 
way. To stand a chance of winning a 
copy, correctly answer the following 
question on the back of a postcard 
and remember to include your own 
name and address: 



The word 'digital' is derived from the 
Greek word for which part of the 
body? The first five correct appli- 
cants drawn from the bag after 
August 30th 1998 will get a copy of 
the CD. 

Alternatively secure your copy by 
sending a cheque or postal order 
made payable to David Dewar for 
£5.99 to Audio Works. PO Box 3567. 
Milton Keynes, MK2 22N. For further 
information phone: 01908 673794 or 
email audio3567.aol.com 



Eyetech 
deals 

Eyetech have announced improved 
specifications for their EZ-PC tower. 
Responding to comments last 
month's review of this Amiga/PC 
Siamese tower system, Eyetech are 
increasing value for money by 
upping the specification of the 
tower to include a 30-bit A4 flat bed 
scanner. 64Mb RAM on the PC, 
3.2Gb hard drive, and 32x CD Rom 



EEH23 



The price remains at £999,95. 

Eyetech claim that this makes it 

40% cheaper than an equivalent 

specification Zorro 3 machine, with 

the added bonus of a free PC. 

Eyetech are also offering people 

wishing to buy their 20 speed CD 

ROM drives (reviewed on page 58) 

a special deal. Cut out the voucher 

below and send it with you order for 

a 24 speed drive at the same cost - 

Eyetech tell us the mechanism is 

the same make. The offer is limited 

and on a first come first serve has is 

Call Eyetech on +44(011642 713185 

or see their ad. on page 39. 
-,. _, 



■ Mill 




||M|nwmiiiiii|aiiii||liia|ii 
JllUlmuLjif 



ii 



2Gx to 24x CD ROM Upgrade offer. 
Valid only with orders from Eyetech 
Group, Ltd, While stocks last. This 
voucher must be sent with your 
order to qualify. 



In Brief 



Kickstart Amiga Sale 

There will be a second hand 
Amiga sale held on 30th August at 
the Brook Hall, Qttershaw. in 
Surrey. The Kickstart sale will 
charge an entry fee of £2, £1 to 
members of the user group. 
Sellers must book in advance, and 
pirates are warned to keep away. 
Contact Rob Gilbert 
(gibie@arrakis.com) or Greg 
Howson (01483 536430) for more 
details. 



Amiga So c reps UGN 

The UGN, the worldwide network 
of Amiga User groups, has 
appointed AmigaSoc as their 
official UGN representatives to the 
UK. AmigaSoc have promised to 
work closely with other members 
of the UGN to provide help and 
support to all UK user groups, 
The AmigaSoc resource includes a 
database of UK usergroups on 
their website, www.amigasoc.Oirg. 
All user groups not currently listed 
are invited to contact them for 
inclusion, email: 
chrisl@uk.amigasoc.org for more 

details- 



Fusion, PCx drop 

As the PPC version of fusion gets 
into gear, Blittersoft have dropped 
the price of their current stocks of 
the current line Of Microcode 
products. Fusion 3.1 and PCx 1.1 
will now be sold for £29,95 each 
or £49.95 for the pair. Contact 
Blittersoft on 01 SOS 261 466, 



Amiga gets BSE 

BSE, the Belgian Scene Event, will 
be held on the 7-9th of August in 
Diepenbeek, Belgium, This demo 
party will include competitions for 
40k intra, demo, music ana 
graphics. For more details check 
out http://bse.base.org or email: 
bseOS@gmK.net 



Midwest Expo 

The Amiga Central Ohio Network 

is organising a show for the 2-4th 
of October, to be held at the Hyatt 
RegencyXolumbus Ohio. It will be 
the largest (by floorspace at least) 
US show, and promises a good 
list of exhibitors and seminars. 
www.amicon.org/mae.html. 






12 



k 



NEWS 



H Stateside News 



by Jtson Compton: Editor in Ch«*» o* Amiga Report Magaiirli* 



Amiga businesses, get listed 



PIM Publications, the publishers ol 
Amazing Computing, America's 
largest Amiga print magazin- 
once again planning the resurrection 
e AG's Guide, 
The Guide is a tome of Amiga 
companies and products that was 
published twice a year until the fall 



f Commodore, when production 
ceased. For some time now, PIM 
have been attempting to update 
their master database, which 55 we 
all know has seen a great deal of 
turnover since 1994. 

Since a new publication date has 
not yet been set in stone, it's not 



too late to be included in the next 
Guide. 

Listings., as always, will be free in 
the new edition, For more informa- 
tion, contact PIM Publications at PO 
Box 9490, Fall River, MA 02720, or 
online at: 
www. pimpub.com. 



Pill Pibkuiu, W. ?i *ln-, { 









Sassenrath talks 



The fundamental approach of his 
new REBOL project may he some- 
thing few truly understand and even 
fewer have actually seen any physi- 
cal evidence for. but Carl Sassenrath. 
who recently formalized his ava 
garde computing concept into a 
company, sure finds him serf tn the 
news a lot these days, 

He recently gave a lengthy inter- 
view to local radio station KZYX on 
REBOL and his take on the future of 
computing. If yog have access to 
RealAudio players and wish to hear 
the interview, it is online at 
www, kzyx. rg/pc/a rchives/rebol 
|if you don't have RA abilities, you 
can still check out the bio on 
Sassenrath on this website J 



; also slated to figure very heavi- 
developer arid general user dis- 
and Question and Answer 
sessions at the California AmiWest 
show of this summer. It may not be 
a complete coincidence that his 
largest public push to date for 
REBOL Technologies will come at an 

ia show relatively nearby his 
operations. 8iso in California, 

REBOL might best be described 
as something more than a new lan- 
guage, but less than a new operat- 
ing system- For some more 
information, check out; 
www.rebol.com, or you can try and 
find one of the small handful of 
REBOL alpha testers and pump 
them for information. 




Carl Sraennth - KbBOLvrith a Came 

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AMIGA. INFO 



Possibly another minor victory in 
the slow redemption of the Amiga 
in the eyes of the North American 
computing pies.£, Ontario's 
Monitor computer publication has 
added an "Amiga. info" section to 
its online version, The Amiga cov- 
erage is handled by Ray Binda and 
Thomas Lerou*., and provides sum- 
mary and commentary on current 
Amiga issues and products. 

Presumably, a strong perfor- 
mance online could lead to actual 
column-inches in the magazine 
proper down the line The 
Monitor's print distribution is 
36.000 Canadians, 



For more information, contact the 
Monitor at 613-596-1358. or 
www.monitor.ca/monitQr online. 




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13 




Welcome to CUCD25. This CD is 
crammed full of programs, games, 
utilities, mods and a host of other 
goodies. If you don't yet have a 
CD drive, this is your reason to 
buy one. Prices have never been 
lower and 650MB of quality soft- 
ware each month is just too good 
to miss out on. 



Making the most of CUCD 25 



All CUCDs are designed to be used whether you boot from the 
CD or your normal Workbench. If you boot from the CD, 
everything is setup and ready to go. If you want to access 
the CD from your Workbench, you should first run InitCD. This sets 
up various assigns and paths needed by programs on the CD. so if 
you don't do it. things won't work. It doesn't make any changes to 
your system, or write any files to your hard drive, all changes are 
temporary and can be reversed by running InitCD again. The error 
some people were experiencing with updatecopy hag been fixed 
now. and the fix means that you won't see the error again, even with 
older CDs. 

Your own custom CD 

In the past you had to use whatever file viewers we set up on the 
CD. since these had to work with all Amigas they were quite limited. 
From CUCD 1 2 we decided to allow you to specify how the CD 
should work on your Amiga and included CDPrefs in the CDSupport 
drawer. If you have never run this before yflu should be asked if you 
want to when you run InitCD. CDPrefs lets you specify which pro- 
gram you went to use to handle each type of file, graphics card 
users can view pictures in Full 24 brt colour. ProjectXG users can lis- 
ten to midi files through their midi card, people with sound cards 
can listen to mods with an AH I module player and PowerPC users 
can use the fast file viewers and mpgg players available for their 
machines. It also means we were able to provide different defaults 
for Workbench 2.x users. 

Once you have run CDPrefs, your setting will be saved to your 
hard drive and will be used every time you use this CD or any other 
CUCD. Some people had problems with the original use of IDer. 
partly through a lack of understanding of how it worked and partly 
through a lack gf explanation from us. All icons now use CUCDfile 
as their default tool, and the previous IDer problems should be a 
thing of the past. InitCD now copies CUCDfile and it's configuration 
to your hard drive, if it's not already there, This means that files 
copied! from the CD will now work withoui needing the CD present. 
You will almost certainly need to run CUCDprefS to set it up to use 
your own viewers, but you should do that anyway as it will result in 
faster access, If you do have any problems, make sure you have run 
InitCD, at least once. 



' >:*» IT* m rut 11 



How much of what? 



AudioSpecial 


68MB 


Magazine 


Z1MB 


CDSupport 


71MB 


Online 


3SMB 


System files 


13MB 


Programming 


15MB 


CDROM 


22MB 


Readers 


1BMB 


Demos 


23MB 


Sound 


62MB 


Games 


166MB 


Utilities 


20MB 


Graphics 


44MB 


www 


28MB 


nformation 


4MB 








CD-ROMS 



Highlights of CU Amiga Super CD 25 



I 



:he 



ith 




AmigaAMP 



CUCD/Saund AmigaAMP 
AmigaAMP is not just another 
mp&g audio player As well as Sup- 
porting PowerPC and BBOxO proces- 
sors for decoding it also has a 
compact but useful interface, look- 
ing like an audio CD player. But it 
doesn't stop there, AmigaAMP can 
use skins designed for Win AMP the 
Windows port of AMP 




These skins completely change 
the appearance of the interface and 
there are hundreds (possibly thou- 
sands) to choose from, The skins 
director/ contains well over 1 00 dif- 
ferent skins, with an icon to start 
AmigaAMP with each one. 



B--.> .- . I. ■ 




ToolManager 

CUCD Utilities TootM»nag*r 

ToolManager has to be one of the 

biggest time savers available. It 
offers several ways of starting pro- 
grams, all of them much faster 
than opening several levels of 
drawers to reaeh an icon, you can 
Start programs from a dock (a but- 
ton bank), the Tools menu Or a 
hotkey. It also supports drag and 
drop; drop a pic- 
ture's icon onto 
the PPaint button 
and PPaint will 
start up and load 
the picture for 
editing. Drop any 
file onto a 
Multiview (or ■■ 
IDer) button and 
it will be viewed 
or played. This 
drag and drop 
ease of use also 
extends to set- 
ting ToolManager 
up through its preferences editor, 

MCP 

CUCD, Utilities/ MCP 

Since MCP was featured in the 
Workbench 2000 article in the 
January CU Amiga, it has under- 
gone many 
changes and 
refinements. 
This is the 
latest beta 
version Of 
MCR which 
has proven 
very stable 
here despite 
being 
classed as 
beta. The 
advice given 
in January 



A ThEEi arc Quake Total CniiWiitns ThtV "Hi* "ilk *« fil version ol Qiiaht bit gift ffl« II CDfllBlete- 
I'r diNerent game Time are- m*Wf 1*1*1 and partial [diversions milieu tar PC filiate-. Hli mo*i ol then 
will wnit with lliB Amiga versiti. St VMOck tar m«rc on forth coming CDs. 



still applies, try the options one at 
a time, if you try to switch every- 
thing on at once you are asking for 
trouble -this is a fairly powerful 
commodity. 

ProNET 

CUCO/Gnlina/PrnNET 

Of all the various solutions for net- 
working two Amigas without 
expensive hardware, ProNET is the 
most flexible and stable. You can 
connect machines using either the 
parallel or serial ports (or even the 
floppy drive ports with a bit of DIY 
hardware). You can also find 
ProNET in the CDSupport drawer, 
complete with icons to start up 
either parallel or serial links, for 
those of you who want to link a 
CD32 or CDTV to your Amiga, 

VUebPlug 

CUCD/Online/WebPlug 

It's impossible to have a WYSI- 
WYG HTML editor, since HTML 
itself is not WYSIWYG (What You 
See Is What You Get), but 
WebPlug does a good job of creat- 
ing HTML pages though a graphi- 
cal interface. Because you see the 
actual HTML code in the window, 
it helps you to learn and under- 
stand what's happening, rather 
than hiding it from you. 

Amiga World 

CUCD/ Information/ Amiga World 

AmigaWorld is a database of infor- 
mation on just ahout every country 
in the World. Using a straightfor- 
ward graphical interface, you can 
see exactly where a country is and 
find out information about the 
country, it's currency, languages 
and much more. 



Making things 
work 

Wherever possible, we 
have tried to make soft- 
ware work straight from 
the CD, this isn't always 
possible for a number of 
reasons. Some programs 
need to be installed to your 
hard drive to work, often 
requiring specific system 
files. These files are usually 
on the CD so running 
InitCD often helps here 
Most software contains a 
list of system requirements 
in the documentation, and 
some will not run unless 
you have the required 
processor, memory operat- 
ing system version or 
chipset 

Sonne programs, partic- 
ularly demos and games 
are written in an OS illegal 
way. This can mean they 
only work on specific 
machine specifications, 
sometimes the readme 
states this, but not always. 
Many demos are intended 
to be run for a shell, the 
icons we add simply start 
them from a script. In some 
cases this will not work, 
especially demos that need 
a lot of Chip RAM. In this 
case you will need to boot 
without start up- sequence 
and run the program from 
the shell. Your Workbench 
manual should explain how 
to do this. 



CD-ROMS 



What's on this month's CU Amiga CD? 




Audi oSpecial : 

A huge collection of software and 
utilities to help you create, process 
and listen to your musical master- 
pieces. This includes special ver- 
sions of Samplitude and 
SoundProbe, plus a copy ol 
MakeCD so you can commit your 
production to CD and send them 
to us as a potential audio track for 
a future CU Amiga CD. 

CDSupport: 

This contains various support files, 
such as mod players, anim play- 
ers, GMPlay, Mill. ClassAct. Most 
importantly, this is where the 
CDPrefs program lives, With this 
you can customise your CUCD to 
launch your choice of program for 
each type of file, Two other 
notable icons in here are 
Docs. guide, with links to all the 
program documentation files on 
the- CD, and Index. Run Index, type 
in the name of a program, or part 
of it, and it will search the con- 
tents of the CD for you. Vou can 
either search the current CD or the 
index files of all CUCDs since num- 
ber 4. CDSupport also contains 
icons to start ProNET in various 
configurations, ready to use when 
linking a CDTV or CD32 to another 
Amiga. 

CUCD: 

This drawer contains most of the 




CD contents, here is a selection of 
what each drawer holds. 

CDROWI: 

We have updated 
versions of iDE-Fix 
and CDCat, a CD 
contents database, 
along with a new '■ 
audio CD player. We have also 
added to the CDID collection, 
there are now over 6300 CDs 
here. Each one has the artist and 
title in the file comment, so it's 
easy to pick out the right ones 
for your CD collection, 

Demos: 

Not quite the 

mega-collection of 
last month, but 
there's still over 
23MB of Flashing, 
swirling, scrolling, sliding, thump- 
ing demos, 

Games; 

Plenty ol games 
this month, with 
a special demo of 
Genetic Species 
and some Total 
conversion add- 
ons for Quake, There are also a 
couple of collections of game 
cheats, an update for Foundation, 
new editor and data files for 
F1GP and a huge FMV game. 






Graphics: 

The 3D renderer 
RayStorm has 
been updated and 
now features ver- 
sion for 6S020, 
68040, 68060 and 
PowerPC. There are also new file 
viewers, and updates for 
Photogenics2 and more icons 
and backdrops to customise your 
Workbench, 

Information: 

This drawer con- 

d tains updated ref- 
erence guides on 
Amiga system 
files. The 
Amiga Wo rid country database 
contains a vast amount of infor- 
mation on just about every coun- 
try in the World. 

Magazine: 

The drawer con- 
tains support files 

for the various fea- 
tures within the 
magazine, such as 
the source code for the C tutori- 
al, the programs reviewed in 
InternetPD, ail of the programs 
mentioned in Wired World and 
the latest information gn the uni- 
verse of Explorer2260. There is 
also an update to last month's 
Scalos giveaway. 

Online: 

We have a wide 
range of software 
this month. Not 
only for the 
Internet, but also 
BBS and networking software, as 
well as the latest news from 
Ami net and archives from the 
newly resurrected CU Amiga 
mailing list, 

Programming: 






Readers: 

All your own work. 
These are the 
games, utilities, 
mods, pictures 
and anims that 
you send us, If 
you think you can do better, do it. 

Sound: 

In addition to the 
AudioSpecial, 
there are utilities, 
players, mods and 
samples here, as 
well as the superb AmigaAMP 
mpeg player, with a huge col lee 
tion of skins. 

Utilities: 

As usual, this drawer 
has a wide variety of 
useful or interesting 
utilities. Updates to 
old favourites like 
MCP and Too I Manager are along- 
side new creations such as 
Smartfilesystem and icon Handler. 





WWW: 




More useful and inter- 
esting pages from the 
World Wide Web, plus 
the latest versions of 
the main Amiga 



browsers. 





AmigaAMP Skirts 
TMSp 



and 

information for 
programming in C, E, 
Blitz, with utilities for 
MUI, Triton and 
GadTools, 
We also have the 
latest ixemul libraries 
and support files. 





Owjuai *C£*5.s.'-'iSS Incrl debit cardsl *ll 3nce= 
IM ill VAT. Poslageand Packing E7.D0 * VAT 
i •ndEISOO-VAt ijjluirlsy: Hrcas and 
i may change wilhoul nuOce. Pltais* rete- 
ll pron^'spwlC^l^rL'^^ailahlily t-rilDT 
l E40€ All Irajciraika aCWKjiiledged. Q«XK 
»llml hM Al orclor & snbocl Irmur Barms 
i rflrading, araiatols ud rfrtufrit 




i r ■: v fSOl 



6 Drakes Mews, Crownhill Industry. 

Milton Keynes. MK8 OEH. UK. 

Sales ; *44 (0)1 SOB 251456 (3.Q0am-5.uOpm) 

Tech : +44 (Of 1 SOS 26 1 477 (1 0Oprri-4.O0pm) 

Fa*. i-44 (OH 906 261466 

email: sales ® blirtersolt.com 

technical ablitlersori.earn 

Wen : hhp.0www.blit1ersaft.com 



Amiga OS 3.1 



i - Official Amiga OS Upgrade 

i SCO. Amiga 500*. 
I tSOO. Amiga 2000 
I »300. Amiga SX»[I). 

|4W0lTl 



1 1 i ROM * only 



ff- 



1 500. Amicja 500*, 
1 1500. Amiga 2QC0 
12TJ0. Amiga 3000 ( Inc Tower,. 
1 4000 (Inc. Tower) 



Art Effect 



C 25.35 
E 23 .35 



uses the same concapls as industry stan- 
il packages and brings nam to 1he Amiga. 
now has Layers and Virtual Memory! Art-Effect 
turthef anprnvBd with add-on modules. 



WV1.5 
lEBect V2.0 



■l ss.as 

El 19.95 



Tornado 3D 




Tornado 3D V1 .5 boasts 
many advanced features. 
The latest rendering 
lechnology for your 
Amiga. 

Available now! £179,95 



Storm C 



ftanrnC V3 .D Base Package 

■W Corrimcrrjin.1 licefHe £1*9 95 

IwroC V3.0 Base Package 

^*fii^r\a\ unnesuncted license 

-PpwurASMV3.0 £ B9.B5 

-WIZARD VZ.D - GUI creation 
BMr Modules ^4JT regwe Storm Chase pacioage! 
•armC VJ.O - p.OS-Modute 
ffarmC V3.0 - PowerUp-Module 
fc"*C V3.0 ■ Power ASM-Module 



Genlocks 



*S2S Genlock As per MG- 10 plus RGB Monitor 
••en separate RGB colour setlirag, S-VHS. Video- 
nd Alpha-Channel bypass. £249.95 

U Genlock As per MG-25 plus Pictura-in-Picture. 
fcna by. External device control bus . £349.95 

■hwed nemole conlrol E 49.95 

b«Qad 1 100 keys I £ 79.95 



Hard Drives t CD-ROM 



• Qb IDE Hard Drive UDMA 

'. IDE Hard Drive UDMA 

IDE Hard Drive UDMA 

■ Speed CD-ROM IDE 

P Speed CO-fiOM IDE 
B Speed CD-ROM SCSI 



Memory / Storage 



SIMM 72-Pin 
SIMM 72-Pin 



►AiASONIC LS120 120Mb Drive 
** Drive IDDMb IDE Internal 



El 2*. 95 
1144 BS 
£164.95 

£ 69.95 
£ 79.35 
£ 69,95 



£ Z4.9* 

E 49.95 

E 79.95 

C 79.95 



Scandoubter/Monitor 



Amfoa Approved StirnDovMtrz 

Al203Scandoublef £54.35 

Scaridoublftr (naqynfes video slot) £ 69.9S 

ndoubter (Any Amiga! E 74.35 




fterfai Wonrfors. requrre BcamCoufifer' * fflWMO (V 

: ;1a Monitor HUM 

- Digital Monitor £25,9.95 



Picasso IV 



Wrfhout 
doubt 1h* 
most 
stunmng 
graphics 
^"~ c*fdyel 

toMhe Amiga. 
No wonder GU Amiga claimed this to be 
'The God of Affng6 Gm>H<cs Cante/" 

Integrated flicker few. 4Mb EDO RAM. 
Auicsersse Zorro II or Zorro ill 



Amiga Computers Tower Kits 




Concierto IV 



1 6-bit Sound irtCKtwIe lor Picasso IV 

> Yamaha OPUS synthesizer 
~> 16 vdiMS and digital playback 
} Records m morio and stereo 

O Two Midi ewirwtors plua • 

> AHI, MIDI.Serial driver and ARbxx suppon 
') Requires Pi&aSStXV i,rimn*art 

} EB.020 CPU or befler. OS 2 04 or I 




Conciertn IV 



I C9 K 



Pablo IV 



Videc Encoder module 'or 
Picasso IV 

3 Output f^ewso screens 

to VCRs. leieni+rOri tM 

and studn eqiBprnam 
-> S-VHS or CVBS <ComposJ 
J Displays 54Q«4B0 and BOO 

> A Tune B*se C o rfre cW •» * 

> Requires Picia»orV fftmtiv* 4 1*, 



Prt*>lV 



vxleo modas 

10 (PAL BM'I only) 

..rad for gantodung 



PatriolV 



t 6ffiT& 



Paioma IV 




TV mixMe tor Picasso W U,m^ fii 

1 T*o vidao-in c+iannBte tor the p~ 

nK*pdon ol S-VHS and 

VHF/UHF laenal) Signals 
> ("le^erales video images on 

the Amiga wmfcbench 
1 AI TV im*ja* displayed in a 24-bil window 
3 Pictures can Be saved and Killed 
) OapliHed signal can be mixed with computer 

generaled grapnes 
3 Use wflh Pablo IV to produce a digital genlock. 



Paioma IV 



£39.95 



AslmCDFS / MasterlSO V2 



AsimCOFE CD-ROM scitware rrlegriales sophislieatea 
CD-ROM technology into 1he Amiga operasng syslem. 



AsimCDFS, 



E 49.95 



MMtoriSO Varsaon J e an advanced CD-ftKW system 
wfh an BxcsUem new rterlace. Mow suppods T<se*-at- 
Once. Disk-al-Once and CD-Ffe-Wrilable Icimats. 



Master ISO VZ.D 



A Web II 



Surl 1h4 Web an your Amiga! 

AWeb is a fully tealured web 
orows*' irtttwdlngi Iramea. JavaScript elc. 



\m 



t n.M 



Get it 



AWeb II V3.D 



Prelude 



£ 29 M 



Prelude 




E1 69.95 



Innnili. kilS t\4*.*i 

5 IrBVijFv Tc**r 
3 Irv-bmA PC Keyboard Iniertae* 
) 200WPSU 
) ■Viridows 95 Keytoard ' 
(Or replace with E rtamal Al ZQQ 
Keyboard case tor IITt.tf) 
1 Ponrer-ln Adaptor £N non-Zorro) 

iBFinili^ Kit/ 2' I27»,?J 

1 inNrifth. Tower KM-S 
> 22 board 

"Im 5 3" Ir. rmond ™h '<:> il I *Jll amknmpr AM 



|.,r,l>.l,. Ki(-ZJ 
> inhnitiv Tower K4-S 
"J Z3 board 



%U<t.tf 



12 beard Zorro II x 5. PCI x 2, 




ISA r. Z. Video (option) 


£14*1.!*? 


Zi board ZorroHI i 5. PCI x2. 




ISA* J, Video (option). SCSI-1 1. 




A4000 CPU skrl 


OJ»,M 




hlfinitii I2M 'Ir.wcr Kits 

J Naw Design - Melal Sub Fiajn* 

) Amiga InlemationaJ Logo 

1 B.jiII In PC Keyboard Iniarrace 

3 300WPSU 
□ ExpandEible 

"J ZonoHand III Capabto 

) No soldering 

1 Video Stol optional 
O Full English Manuftl 

'> Easy Shde-ln Tray lining 

) AmKga Keyboard Oplion 
O Many Esrtras 

Individual Infinitiv COmpdnenl Part* 

Infmitiv Tower + Keyboard interlace 

Infinitiv upraiad PftU 

Inliniliv 3.S™ "Snap' on" bay £ 

Inlinrtiv 5.25' 'Snap-on" bay 

PCMCIA Ari^la Adaptor 

Inliniliv Video Slot Interface Z2 

InlinHiv Video Slot Interface Z3 

Windows 95 Keyboard 

CD-ROM Bezel £ 

IDE cable, 25 - 10 2.5" -i- 3.S" £ 



IaflBitiv 1300 


Infijiitiv 1400 


3 AIJOOMtsoard 


J As per 1300 phis. 


1 OS3.1 


.} SKZorroll 


O 200WPSU 


) ? ,. ISA 


i Mouse 


^ 2 x PCI 


1 Edema! Amiga 


~> Video option 


MytMaed 




5 Floppy drivfl, 




£329,95 


£419-95 



[nflnitiv 1900 

> As per 130Oplgs 

> 5xZorroHI 
O 1 k ISA 

•> ? s PCI 
O VltSeo option 
O A4O0OCPUSIO1 

") SCSI-1! interlace 



.^*-«"+ {^y 



win;' 



99.95 
49.95 

9.95 
29.95 
24.95 
39.95 
33-35 
14.95 

4.9S 
14.9S 



Tower Kill lor tin CwHrtop AMMO nnd A3D0D 

MttatCE Tom', Zo'rt ill AWS X ?. ISA iVJIE * 5 16 pn 30W,f, 
V>3lKi j.' [Iiji .lOfKiJ. PCI wcraran imi d i PC/ ara 'J r iS^ 

HM 
E3WS5 
HlliS 
t!7».» 
BH St 

E17H.SS 



Ttiwer^OMPCISyelem ftrwur wid tano^Ot 
I ciwnr 4CK10 ISA SyHern rTOioar and ZCTKVtSAI 
Zdnu IIUSA/PCWId (A«JW - hwm only, 
Znm ii .•iS*.-Vijis) ia'uuc - board :-i . v i 

Tower 3000 I5A Sytlem i;TgpMir arri Zorroj 
Zsm HV1SA.<Vidn IA3OD0 ■ beard only) 
Uprated psu Istatn sna or *x») 



Power Adaptor (Noiv2oTfO Towers) 

Externa! AiauO Keyboard casa L 

Audio Slot Bezel (2 X Phono.) 

IDE cable. 2.S" to 2x3.5' 

Fronl IjU^el (f II 3.5" devnce in S.25" bay) 



Phase 5 Accelerators 



CyberSlorm PPC 
190 MHz No CPU 
£00 MHz Mo CPU 

233 MHz No CPU 



180 MHz 
1fiD MHz 

MO MHz 
2O0MHJ 



■ 68040/25 CPU 

■ 6606a.'E0 CPU 

■ 6a04u.'2& CPU 

Baoeoi'so cpu 



233 MHz * 6S040,'2S CPU 
233 MHi * eswo/so CPU 



f!449-95 
£529 95 
£559.95 

E48».irS 

tinm 

C55».S4 

C5».»5 

E749.95 



CytwrStorm MKI II 6608050 MHz £449.95 

Wrffi buHT-ifl Crfra-rVV* SftSr. Matching SlMH rJfliri /eau'Wd 



Blizzard 12*0 50 MHi B8O60 CPU 
Blizzard SCSI lor Blizzard 1 230 v 1 2*0 



mui 

£ 59.95 



Blizzard PPC 603. 

160 MHz 68040 @2&MHz 

160MHz66060e50r.1Hi 

200 MHz 68.040 a25f.*Hz 
200MHz6B060e50MHj 

250 MHz 5B046 625MHz 
250 MHi 68060 $S0MHa 

SW1WH PPC 603+Wltll Fast SCSMI 
160MHz63O40 e25MHt 
150 MHz SSOrJU a'E.QMHz 

200 MHz 6SM0 i(J25MHz 
20OMHt 68060© 50MHz 

250 MHI 68040 e2SMHz 
250 MHz 66060 B50MHZ 



£ 5.9S 

S 39-95 

£ 14 95 

£ 14.9* 

f 14.9* 



E344.H 

mm 



ESM 5 r , 

£499.95 



£354.95 
£579.95 



£294.95 

£499.95 

£354.95 
£579 95 

£409.95 
£629.95 



o 



Fusion and PCx • Emulate a Mac or PC! 



FUSION - The ultimate Software Mac Emulation! 

Quite smply Hw uH^iale Macintosh emulator en ANY platform! f*ew Version 3.1 with System, 
8.1 suppon! Macintosh emulation is Slick on 1he Amiga, and offers a weaflh tfl SOnwarte rn pe 
used m wniunction wilh your Amiga. Fusion, takes advantage at graphics cards. SCSI. CD- 
ROM, removal^, Virtual Memory, and more. We also support lha 68060" Mac devices can be 
mounted on the Workbench and tnans- is a comprehensive file 1rans1er mechanism wim tna m-buitt ICP sys- 
tem and huge database of 1ile types. Wilh on the lly resolulion switching, full System 8.1 Support, FwS«3n r3 
the lop Mac emulator for the Amiga. (Requires GB020 Of b*tt*r, 4Mb Fast RAM, 20Mb Hard drive space 
System 7.1 .0 or latar, convafible Macintosh ROM's). 

E 29.95 



PC i Advanced software only 80x86 PC emulation for your Amiga 

PCx otters PC emulsion on your Amiga. PCx will run DOS and Windows 3. 1 in standard mode, and lakes 
advantage ol CD-ROM drives. PCx (Squires SS020 or bettBr and Fast 3Mb RAM minimum 



R> 



f. 29,95 



G 



Great New Price*! 
Buy BOTH for £49.95 N 



J 




I A1200 4-Way IDE Interface 
dudes registered IDE-Fix 97 Software 
: ' Adaptor (23-pin men. to 15-ptn gfa) 
Adaptor {23-pin Amiga to 15-pin mon.} 
C Keyboard interface lor 1200 Desktop 
C Keyboard interface lor 1200 Tower 



PC Keyboard interface for 4000 
CatWeasel MK ll 1200 



£ 34.95 
£ 49.95 



£ 29.95 
4.95 
£ 14.95 
£ 39.95 
£ 39.95 



Floppy Drives - High Density No Software PatvM 

Floppy D riv e 1 -76Mb inl. for A4GO0 1 " high £ 54.95 
Floppy Drive 1.76Mb int. tor A 1200 1" high 
Floppy Drive 1 76Mb Est. for any Amiga 



All-m-ono ghir.it' «i lool lor automatic 
picture organisation . tonsk«it conversion, 
searching, prtntng. image processing. 
PhotoCO access srvd iworal Now wtth 
PPC support and Web Wizard' 

Picture Manager PfohessioiWl V5 
CS6.95 





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Both CD and cover disks this 
month come complete with 
Samplitude CD, an excellent 
sample editor and CD audio 
preparation application. 

Features 

* Professional quality sound processing 

* Audio image preparation features 

* Multiple sound card support 

* 100% Compatible with stock AT 200 




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Installation of Samplitude CD is easy. Boot from your hard drive 
and then drag the Samplitude icon from the cover disk or Audio 
Special drawer of the CD to wherever you want it installed on 
your hard drive. Now double click the icon you've just put onto 
your hard drive to initiate the installation. Once installation has 
finished you cart run Samplitude straight away. Select Update 
from the Workbench Window menu to reveal the installed 
Samplitude software 



DISKS 

amplitude CD 




amplitude CD is a spe- 
cial version of the latest 
release of Samplitude 
Opus, reviewed in this 
issue on page 56. It 
offers everything you need for 
recording, editing and preparing 
data for audio CD ROMs', and along 
the way acts as a capable sampler 
and sample editor top. All you need 
to bum your CD is a CD writer and a 
CD writer progRAM that supports 
the new AIFF-CD' extension of the 
AIFF audio format. MakeCD is cur- 
rently the best choice for this, which 
can also be found on this month's 
CD, 

Samplitude CD allows you to 
record data from Maestro Pro sound 
cards (digital 10 cards manufactured 
by Mac roSy sterns), all Toccata com- 
patible cards (like VLab Motion) and 
all Prelude compatible cards (like the 
Prelude-U and Festiva boards). A 
range of parallel port samplers is 
also $upported. Playback via Paula 
(Amiga internal sound) is also possi- 
ble 

Samplitude uses a complex hard 
drive memory system which allows 
you to work with samples complete- 
ly residing on your hard drive. In 
order to get the best speed you 
should follow a few simple rules: 



Use a filesystem block size 
of at least 16K if you want to wort 
with long sampfes. To set your 
filesystem block size to a higher 
value follow the documentation of 
your SCSI or IDE controller software. 
2. Use a controller on your CPU 
card or on your motherboard, not on 
the Zorro bus. Controllers on the 
Zorro bus tend to block the system. 
Set Samplitude CD's internal 
buffers to a size divisable by the 
filesystem's block size. For example, 
when using a filesystem block size 
of 16K, set Samplitude's buffer size 
to 16, 32, 64or12SK. 
4. Use DOS access when work- 
ing with slow setups, and use 
DEVice access when working with 
very fast setups. Generally you 
should try this out. \n most cases a 
DOS access will be faster than 
DEVice access. DEVice access can 
only be used with filesystem block 
sizes of 512 bytes. 

To adjust your Settings start 
Samplitude CD and press 'g' or 
select Preferences/System. After 
changing everything according to 
your needs, close the window and 
select Save Setup from the 
Preferences menu. Next you should 
open a new project or load an exist- 
ing project into Samplitude CD. If 



t Samplitude CD offers s wide raige if sampling and recording possibilities. 

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COVER DISKS 



Audio image preparation 



Ranges and cursors are used in creating AIFF CD images. A range 
defines a CD track while a cursor defines an Index. 

This gives you the opportunity of sampling a complete record's 
side in one take- Select the single titles as ranges (leaving the 
space between them untouched, thus sparing editing time), store 
the ranges and eventually create cursors within the ranges (these 
will be converted to index markers on the audio CD), Creating a CD 
copy of b record can be done just seconds after having sampled 
the complete record! Of course, duplicating copyrighted material is 
against the law. Here's how it's done anyway.,. 

Simply do an AIFF-CD export to create the audio image. The 
parameter window popping up will allow you to choose some 
parameters. Usually you should leave them just the way they are. 
Index markers and Tracks are what you want, so disabling them in 
this window will result in a Standard AIFF file, which could have 
been exported by the standard AIFF exporter as well. Copyright 
and Emphasis can be set if this is desired (usually you won't have 
Preemphasized audio data), 

AIFF-CD is an extension to the standard AIFF which can be 
interpreted by MakeCD and quite probably other programs as well. 
Prelude's Graphic Tape Deck is already being expanded to support 
AIFF-CD track and index markers. If an application can not inter- 
pret the Tracklnfo Chunk it will still import the complete sample 
data. Importing AIFF-CD images will create the track ranges and 
index cursors automatically. If you do not see the ranges right 
away, open the range manager and manually select them. AIFF-CD 
Images can currently be exported by MakeCD, 

The AIFFCD extension is (C) 1998 by Patrick Only. Developer 
support is given by the author and A.C.T who participated in defin- 
ing the extension. 

Samplitude CD is a complex program. You can get used to it by 
trying out the functions and playing around. If you have any prob- 
lems you can contact A.C.T. directly at any time. There is also a 
mailing list to which you can post questions. 



you do not have a project to lcad r 
select Projects,'New/RAM. Now press 
'p' or seiect Effects/ PaRA Meter You 
should adjust the playback hardware 
setting. If your systems is equipped 
with one of the supported sound 
cards you will be able to select it with 
the mode gadget. Close the window 
and again Save Setup. 

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4 Multiple sounds cat lie worked oi simullaieoiisly. 



their file format. So if you want to 
explore the prog RAM's capabilities, 
press Right Amiga + I or select 
Projects/Import/General and try to 
import some of your sound files. 
Samplitude CD will ask you whether 
you want to create a RAM or a hard 
drive project. These project formats 
both have advantages and disadvan- 
tages. Their 
b|»|+ use depends 
— * on what you 
want to do. 
HDP: Hard 
Disk Projects 
keep their 
sampling 
data on your 
hard drive 
(usually in 
the HDP: 
assign see 
'Further 
setups'), giv- 
ing you lots 
of sampling 
space to 
work with - 



sU^eiM t| 



is considerably slower than when 
using just RAM, 

RAP: RAM Projects are based in 
your computer's RAM. Editing these 
sample projects is very fast, but you 
are limited to your system's memory. 

Generally you should use RAPs if 
you want to edit data (cutting, 
effects, etc.) hut use HDPs if you 
want to create audio images for CD 
or simply convert large amounts of 
data. HDPs are loaded much faster 
since only the optical representation 
of the sample data is actually 
loaded, not the sample data itself. 

Once you have loaded some 




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First Steps as long as your hard drive filesys- 

Samplitude CD can import most tern's space lasts, The drawback of 

major sound formats, auto-detecting these projects is that editing them 



a Select the ouiput device and rates Irem hers. 

data into Samplitude CD you can 
start editing it Click somewhere 
into the sample edit window, hold 
down the mouse button and move 
the mouse. A range will be created. 
The reason for ranges being created 
"reeiangulary" is that you can make 
offset adjustments with Samplitude 
(Voltage offset etc. I. If you prefer a 
time space oriented range only, sim- 
ply activate Preferences/Vertical Fix. 

When cutting data from your 
sample to the clip board there will 
be a delay while Sam pi i rude Opus 
transfers data to the Clip, You 
can adjust the way clips are 
created - if you want to use 
the same kind of project you 
are editing in the dip as well, 
set Create Clip to Original in 
the system parameter window 
(Preferences/System or 'g'l. If 
you always want to create 
RAps when creating a clip, set 
it to RAM - or if you want to 
have HDPs, set it to hard 
drive. This way you can easily 
convert an HDP to a RAP and 
vice versa - simply adjust the 
clip project type, select your 
complete sample and press 'C' 
(for copy). 



To pop up the current dip press 
the ESCape key. The project, clip 
can be handled just like any other 
project and can therefore* be saved 
and exported just the same. 

Converting sample 

properties 

In Samplitude CD the Pitch 
Shifter/Time Stretcher capabilities 
are disabled (like most of the high 
end functions available in 
Samplitude Opus), but you can use 
the Resampier. Imagine you 
imported a 22kHz IFF sample and 
want to burn that to CD, You need 
it in 16-bit, 44 kHz 
stereo, so you 
should resample it 
to 44kHz first... 
Choose Effects;' 
DSP/Resample. 
click on 44kHz and 
select OK. 
Remember to 
change the pro- 
ject's parameter to 
44kHz. Now press 
'p' or seiect 
Effetcs/Parameter. 
The next step is to 
change the sam 
pie's resolution (if it 
is not in 16-bit 
already). Choose 
Effects/ 
ProjectSpecial/ 
Change Resolution, 
select 16 and click on Convert. The 
last step is to create a stereo pro- 
ject out of a mono one. Select 
Effects/ Project Special/ 
ProjectStereo or press ']' on the 
numeric keypad (the key above 8). 
That's it. you now have a CD ready 
sample. 

Note that although the resam- 
pling quality of Samplitude Opus 
CD already is very good the full 
version will give you studio quality 
with nearly no windowing frag- 
ments. 



D j Byst€l"i preferences 



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*. Cinlignre Samplitude CD ti slIi your system. 



COVER DISKS 



Reverb, echo... 

Samplitude CD's lading capabilites 
are not limited to linear fade in or 
fade out like many other applica- 
tions. Audio volume has to be han- 
dled logarithmically, so LOG. LIN and 
EXP fading characteristics have been 
inn pie men ted. To do a fade out at the 
end of a long sample select the 
range where the fade should happen 
and press T or choose 
Effects/Am pi itude/Fgde. The window 
appearing allows you to adjust any- 
thing you need for amplitude manip- 
ulation. 

Reverbation is implemented in 
the common way (create lots of 
echos). The parameter window's 
options should be self explanatory. 
The same applies to Echo. Note that 
Convolution, the realistic room simu- 
lation using room-samples with filter 
characteristics, early reflection detec- 
tion etc, is available in the 'big' 
Samplitude Opus version only. 

Ranges and cursors 

Samplitude CO can handle as many 
ranges and cursors (positions) per 
project as you want. RAM permit- 
ting. There is a Range Manager avail- 
able from the Project menu (you can 
pop up the Range Manager's win- 



n | aoundKar t e rt-flufnahrt 



Upgrading 



If you like this software you 
can upgrade to Samplitude 
Opus LITE or Samplitude 
Opus (full version) at a spe- 
cial upgrade Offer price. 
Samplitude Opus LITE and 
the full Samplitude Opus 
give you everything 
Samplitude CO offers - and 
a lot more, including non 
destructive editing in virtual 
projects, play list handling, 
high quality mixing (full ver- 
sion), several tracks (Four in 
the LITE, unlimited in the ful 
version), high end FFT func- 
tions (and a studio quality 
denoiser), SMPTE support, 
MIDI TC support and other 
goodies. Please visit the 
Samplitude webpage at 
http : / /Sam p I it u d e . a m i ga- 
software.com. 
Prices are as follows, based 
on upgrading from the 
cover disk version: 
LITE: 50DM (£15, 
Full: 350DM(£110) 
Add 10DM for shipping on 
orders from outside Europe. 




dow by pressing Right Amiga + J). 
Ranges and cursors, can be named 

(Range/Store/Other or 
Range/CursorStore/Other) or put on 
hotkeys (1 to 10). To put a cursor on 
the numerical keys on your keyboard 
press Shift+key<@.g. Shift +1 to 
store the current cursor on key 1 ). To 
store range$ to the function keys 
press Shift I FKey. To select a previ- 
ously stored range or cursor press 
the corresponding key without shift, 

To remove a range, pop up the 
range in question (using the 
Manager or pressing the hotkey if it 
is a range in the first 10) and choose 
RangeVRemoyeRange. To remove a 
cursor select the marker at the top of 
the sample window and move it to 
the right or left - out of the screen. 




Iil ijb 



Contact details 

Samplitude CD is developed by 

A.C.T You can phone them 

Monday to Friday from 1Q;M to 

12:00 and 1400 to 17:00 or 

send a fax or email to them and 

they will respond as quickly as 

possible. There is also an 

English mailing list being run. H 

you want to participate in that 

list, please write an email to 

ListSerw@act-net.com and tell 

them to subscribe you. 

A.C.T. - Albrecht Computer 

Technlk 

SethZ 

21769 Lamstedt 

Germany 

Voic* + 49-4773 &91u-73 

Fax +49J773-B9 10-72 

www.act-nat.eom 

e-mail: support@act-nat.com 



WolfPac 



WolfPac is a 30, first-person perspective version of PacMan, 
If, by some strange chance, you don't already know, the idea of 
the game is to run about a maze gobbling pills and avoiding 
ghosts. There are two types of pills: normal orange ones and blue 
pills, The blue pills will make you invulnerable to the ghosts for a 
short time {the ghost will appear to be half height). You will 
advance to the next level when all the pills have been eaten 
Simple, 

WolfPac will run on any AG A Amiga with an 020 or better and 
4Mb of RAM, although a faster CPU and a graphics card are rec- 
ommended. A PPC version is also supplied which requires a 
PowerUp board and ppc. library V45.16. 

To Start the game ail you have to do is double click on the 
WolfPac icon [or WoffPacPPC for the PPC version |. You will then be 
presented with a screen mode requester, A screen site of 320x240 
is recommended. The PPC version will be playable with larger 
screens, though. If you need any more instructions, read the guide 
file provided. Have fun. 



Game Controls 

Keypad 8/Cursor up 
Keypad 4- ''Cursor left 
Keypad 6/Cursor right 
Keypad 5/Cursor down 
Keypad 7! Alt + left 
Keypad 9/ Alt + right 
s 
f 
Esc 



Move forward 
Turn left 
Turn right 
Move back 
Side step feft 
Side step right 
Toggle fps display 
Toggle floor rendering 
End game 




Sound Probe 2 demo 



We've got you an exclusive demo of HiSoft's Sound Probe as well 
this month. You can play with all of its many and varied effects for 
as long as you like. The limitations are that it won't save out files 
and only the 8-bit disk 
storage system is imple- 
mented, This is more 
than enough to give you 
a taste of what it can do 
for your sounds. See the 
review in this issue for 
more details. The full 
program is available 
from HiSoft for £24 95. 
Call them on 
01525 718 181. 






■Simon !h* Sommr" is o«w al ttie Amiga's 

most loved graphic advanfutfes. 

"A British AdvEnbre that's lakan Hie world Dy 

Storm " The One. 'The anima(ion...has to be 

seen to be believed ' CU Amiga 

"You really shouldnl miss it." AC. Ei 

The voice of simon is 

Chris Banrie (Mr fSntlUSI 

Available on: 

' Am.pt CD i CDS2 . 

'ECS Disk t AGA {ten. 

fllSfluifSS Pmo ram, (CD 

taf Speech! 

Only fM.M 




isum^L 




Call: 1793 432176 Fax: 1793 484097 

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■Viruai Kar1ing2" - Th& Ultimata 
K.ir: n<jS mulatien is linally hit (he 

Amiga. Includes six gruelling 
tracks! Same of Ihe faslest AGA 
textured mapped 3D graphics 
vou'll see. even on a standard 
A 1200. This game really moves, 
^vai'laile on: 
AGA Amjjp 
CO & Disk. 
Onty CM.99 




"Sljttn Sense Investigations" is a new 
graphes adjure lor the Amiga, based 
gqthe classic LucasArts style games. The 
base sioryooard lalls ol a crazy young 
guy who has ihe ability to Cfimmiunicate 
with the spirit ol a sarcastic man. A 
triend . who ftirks of himsell as a. delect 
live, profits trnm 1he psychic abilities erf 

his friend (!he psychic guy) . by using his 

skills to solve fre most bizarre problems 

otthench 

Available on: 

AGA Afikf» CO t COS? and Diss. 

fflerjuires 2mb ram. 4mb tor SQMeh. 

Only £29 99 



■Shadow of Ihe Jrd Moan" 

A tlight simulator like no other. 

*6 dillerenl campaigns 

"Upto 48 missions 

"Digital soundtrack 

•Realistic Fog. Firs. Smoke e1c 

'Fantastic 

landscapes 

Atfh'ADlp an 
AGA Armas. 
60030. CO 
Only £19.99 






"THE BEST AMIGA SAME EVER" 
Thraa Worlds - With 30 tinge locations, 
full spoken dialogue on the CD Version. 
Superb 266 Colour Cartoon Graphics 
50 Ir&me.'second animations throughout. 
Full animaled intra, sequence on CD 
Load and snue al any point in Ihe BUM. 
Hundreds al Herns to pickup and use 
Massively complex enigmas. 

Month's or Gamepiay 

The biggest Graphics Adventure over. 



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Lost Dwys in Ptifittitt 

Testament 2 - The follow up 

tit My tWtiJJrii? ■ Brand New Football Game 

Shadow at the 3fd Moon II • PPC Only 

Tt>\&\ Qambu?lian - Carmageddon clone 

Cfawa ot the Devil - lorn bfl aider on Ihe Amiga 

Evil* Dtiam S£ - HPG with 3D Engine 

Pulsate*, PhWittji, l/irblelou*2, |*aurand more. 



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Normal UK Delivery *2,CM>, Next Day £7.50 
All Prices INCLUDE VAT (@17.5%) >»o» 



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FEATURE 



Con fus e d 




> 



It's all a mess, isn't 

it. First there was 

PPC, then the 

BoXeR, then Inside 

Out and Pre/Box. 

Now Amiga Inc has 

a Superchip. 

Confusion reigns - 

but not for long! 




The most common question I was 
asked by visitors to the World of 
Amiga show was "Should t buv 
PPC?" The news of the 
announcement was out, and all 
the people who had turned up cash in 
hand to join the PowerUp revolution were 
thrown into a state of confusion as to what 
to do with their hard ■ earned cash. It was 
bad enough when they had to decide 

or to go for a PowerUp card or wait 
for a BoXeR, but Amiga Inc. gave a lot of 
people a real decision headache. The 

ya seems to have switched from head- 
>ng no-where to heading all over the place 
n a stanjingly short time, and pretty much 
everyone seems to have been eaughl on 
the hop. 

The players. 

rhe main players in the unfolding: drama are 
>CE. phase 5. Haage & Partners. Access 
formerly Index), Power Computing, Amiga 
Blittersofl, Siamese Systems, and 
international. The minor players are 
many, and some may yet play major roles 
s the play unfolds. Before we delve too 
sap, let's look at the basic facts one step 
as a time: 




41 Amiga Inc. are producing a future 
Amiga, due out in 2 years. 

• Future Amiga is based on a new 
"Superchip". 

• Haage & Partner and phase 5 have 
settled their differences and 
announced co-operation. 

• Amiga Inc will have a developer's 
machine out in November. 

• InsideOut. the Amiga on a PCI card, 
which plugs into a PC, is due in the 
summer. 

• phase 5 hope to expand the PPC line 
and develop PPC Ami gas (Pre/Box) 
by the end of the year. 

• BoXeR will be out in the summer. 

• DCE and Power have dropped the 
A5Q0Q, but are rumoured to have 
replaced it with an exciting new 
project. 

• Amiga Inc is behind all of these 
"Classic Amiga" projects, and want 
to see them prosper in the time 
between now and the release of the 
Future Amiga. 

• Phased want to run the future Amiga 
OB on PPC, and Amiga Inc. have 
admitted that this is possible - and 
something they would like to see. 



A Ctmpl 

d mi qua left, 
phasB Si't 
Pre/Hoi. 1np 
ihr Amiga OS 4 
Jer«lofier's 
machine. 



The contenders. 

So what do all these options offer? 

PowerUp. 

Available: Now. 

An upgrade path to modern CPU power. 
Can bring vast processing power and pow- 
erful 3D graphics lo your Amiga, phase 5 
hope to be able to license OS4/5 to run on 
PowerUP cards. 



Name that Chip! 



Amiga Inc's secrecy over the chip company who are 
making the new Superchip has given rise amongst 
Internet regulars to an enormously popular new game 
of chip company guessing. 
The rules are simple. Locate a possible candidate, 
mention them an the newsgroups. Then wait while 
five people tell you your guess is the best one yet, 
five people show you major inconsistencies in the 
argument, three people say your wrong [while hinting 
that they are in the know], end two people tell you to 
shut up before Bill Gates reads your posting. 
Amiga Inc have assured us that whoever it is, there 
isn't actually any information about this project on 
the 'net, so we won't find it. Never mind, it is fun 
anyhow! 







BoXeR 

Available: August 

Advanced modern Amiga design, 68Q60 up 

to 75MHz. EIDE, PC standard components, 

faster chip RAM. 2Gb RAM capacity, ISA 

Slots, custom slot for planned cheap PPC 

upgrade. 

Inside Out. 

Available: Summer 

PCI board with full Amiga functionality. 
Retargets to a host PC over the PCI inter- 
face, using Siamese software but many, 
marry times faster than Ethernet. 

Developer's system. 

Available November. 

Basically a PC equipped as above r but will 

run the new OS4 on the PC side instead of 

Windows. 

Pre/Box. 

Available: Early '99 



T lisife 

nut. ttiE 

Amiga on s 

PCI Eld 




Powerful PPC based Amigas with one or 
more PPC CPUs. Could eventually come in 
a version with several iGh? Altivec G4 
PPCs. a prospect that would make a Cray 
owner iealous. If deals are signed, it will 
eventually run OS5. 

BoXeR 2, 

Available: late '99? 

Early days yet, but could have PCI. A pro- 
grammable graphics chip is planned which 
would replace the AGA chips with a single 
custom unit capable of all the old AGA 
modes. Also extended graphics modes 
such as 800 by 600 24 bit. 

Future Amiga. 

Available: late '99, early J 0Q. 
A hardware/software system that will be 
made available to third party manufacturers. 
Based on the Superchip, very powerful and 
could cost as little as £300. Likely to come 
in a range of different shades including 

games console, set 
top bo* and A12QO 
style cheap home 
computer. 

An issue of 
OS. 

Currently we have 
the rather dated 
AmigaOS3-1, and 
two incompatible 
PPC kernels. 
PPC. library and 
WarpOS. All this is 
changing. Amiga Inc 
I n S i deO Ut an* worki ng o n 

# 9 AmigaOS4.0 which 



consists of an API layer sitting on top of an 
oil the shelf OS core such as BeOS or 
Linux. The API layer is the programmer's 
hardware abstraction - rather than pro- 
gramming to the processor directly, they 
program to the OS. This will include some 
industry standard elements such as proba- 
bly OpenGL for the 3D graphics API. and 
will probably include Java and extended 
AREXX. It will be fairly fundamentally differ- 
ent from OS3.1, most visibly in a tweaked 
GUI and 24bit screens as standard, but will 
follow the same design philosophy. It will 
have Amiga trademarks such as Datatypes, 
but probably in some expanded form, Most 
of the familiar file structure of the current 
Workbench such as devs, libs and so on 
will continue on in the new OS. 0S4 will be 
followed by a full Operating System. 
AmlgaOS5, It is not clear at this point 
whether the bought - in OS core will still be 
used, or whether there will be a custom 
core written. OS 5 will be fundamentally 
very similar to OS 4 at the user and the 
application programmer level, 

phase 5 and Haage h Partner are work- 
ing together on a PPC kernel, which will be 
backward ly compatible and contain many 
improvements. It will include Haage & 
Partner's now nearly complete 6Bk emula- 
tor, so it will run on PPC only machines 
such as the forthcoming Pre/Box machines. 
The two companies have also said they 
would like to do an OS3.5 themselves, but 
that is down to Amiga Inc agreeing to such 
a thing. Everyone we have spoken to at 
Amiga Inc. and Amiga International seemed 
very keen on this idea, and there might 
even be an agreement by the time that you 
read this. QS3.5 would run on current 




So let me get this straight; there are going to 
be new Amigas in November? 

Not exactly. There are going to he Amiga 
bridge systems, PCs with art Amiga Operating 
System running on them. They will probably be 
dual hardware systems, including a very high 
end 600x0, OS3.1 Amiga in the same case. The 
real new Amiga will come put in November of 
next year; the developer's bridge system merely 
emulates this, 

Then it's true that the new Amiga is going to 
have an Intel processor? I might as well give in 
and buy a PC 

No, no, no! The new Amiga is not going to 
have an Intel processor in it. The bridge system 
runs on an Intel compatible, but this is merely 
for development purposes, QS4 will run on x86 
ps an intermediary measure, as it will allow 
developers to start working on the new system 
very qukkly around a year before the full sys- 



tem is available, QS&, the real Amiga 05, runs 
on the new "superchip" which is not Intel - Intel 
processors are inferior and far more expensive. 
Nothing Intel is working on really suits the 
needs of the Amiga, and the guys at Amiga Inc 
are perfectly aware of this. 

Why are the development systems x86? Why 
not 6Sk or PPC? I don't understand the need to 
drag us into Intel territory, even tor only a year. 

Look, this really is an issue blown out of all 
proportions. Unless you are a developer, yog 
don't really need the new system, although the 
Amiga side of it should be powerful enough to 
be very tempting. In which case you can regard 
the xB* as a slave CPU good only for controlling 
the PCI interface and possibly running the odd 
PC game, The notion of cross platform develop- 
ment is hardly a new one tor the Amiga anyway 
-the Amiga originally had SUN development 
systems, and in the days of big business pro- 
gramming, many coders used Amiga/PC devel- 



opment systems taking advantage of the 
Amiga's ROMWHACK debugging feature. 

So this new Amiga - it's going to be a set top 
box, right? I mean they say otherwise, but all that 
talk of digital convergence makes it pretty clear 
that's what they mean. 

No. The whote point of the digital conver- 
gence philosophy is that the hardware and soft- 
ware will be appropriate for a wide variety of 
applications. Amiga OS5 will be developed in a 
modular fashion which will allow a number of 
different "flavours" of front end to be developed 
with the end application in mind, which may 
well include set top box. 

However the top level of the OS will be a 
sophisticated desktop computer environment 
-you have to work to the top level to cover all 
the bases for lower specification versions- 
Afthough Amiga Inc. wants to produce a system 
highly appropriate STB use, their reference 
designs will be for home computers. 



FEATURE 







fc*i|i tor onr passible hfci! d AmigiQSl. 



fa systems as well as upcoming 
designs in what is rapidly becoming known 
as the "Amiga Classic" line, and may be 
poned to PPC. 

Eventually, OS5 machines will come out 
and at the moment, at least, everyone 
seems keen on the notion of OS5 being 
ported to PPC. Due to the way the new OS 
is programmed to, there would be a very 
high level of compatibility between the PPC 
and Superchip versions. 

For my money... 

r <? are a number of models of Amiga on 
the way, and if you think it's getting conlus- 
ing r you should see what it's like buying a 
C or a Mac. CU Amiga will be bringing you 
tne low down on all the new systems as 
they arrive. The principle question people 
are asking is "should I wait?" The answer is 



no. The fact is that even 
if Amiga Inc hit all their 
targets, the new 
machine is 2 years 
away, and it will be a 
while after that before it 
picks up. If you are will- 
ing to wait up to 3 
years, then what hap- 
pens when the time 
comes? There will no 
doubt be something 
else marvellous in 
another 3 years, do you 
wait for that? 3 years is 
a long time in comput- 
ing. In 1995 the 486 was 
king of the PC hill, yet 
today they are considered ancient 
machines. If you only have to update your 
Amiga every 3 years you're doing very well! 
If you want your Amiga to get any faster 



► Bliwers»ff s 

iBiiBiltft 





A Cant*pt tor iirtlKi AmirjOS "Amur" that mi^ht it nit ipt repfm* 

tn a set 1 up boa 



in the next 2-3 years, that means PPC You'll 
need it if you want to play more advanced 
games or run more powerful applications. 

If you are happy with your current 
machine, a PbwerUP card seems the best 
plan, while if you are after a whgle new sys- 
tem, a BoXeR or Pre/Box or whatever 
DCE/Power do will be the answer. If you 
need PC/Alpha integration, get a Siamese 
PCI. In a couple of years, took for our review 
of the first of the Future Amiga systems. 
but until then Amiga Classic certainly has a 
lot of life left in it! ■ 
Andrew Korn 



superchip ■ shouldn't that be vapourchip? 
?an it sounds pretty hot, but will it really hap- 
pen? Even if it does happen, is there any reason to 
assume it will be anything more than hype 7 

Well no one wants to count their chips 
before they're silicon, but our understanding is 
that this is in a rather better position then most 
The development is apparently very well pro- 
gressed, and enough money has been pumped 

i it to be confident that the investors aren't 
going to let it fall apart now. 

As for hype? Yes, of course there is an ele- 
ment of hype involved. The superchip is not the 
Mfy piece of revolutionary silicon architecture 
that is planned for this time frame, and at the 
moment there is no reason to assume that it 
will be any better than some other things out 
there. The critical point about it is that the 
Amiga will be adopting it as a core technology 
bom the word go, and the operating system 
will be designed to take these next generation 
functions into account. 



Other people will have similar hardware, but 
no-one else will have the dedicated computer 
system that will allow the hardware to be used 
to its fullest. The other platforms retain a legacy 
of older architecture which holds them right 
back, either in terms of power or cost; there is 
every reason to be confident that Amiga Inc. are 
on to a winner 

Someone suggested that the chip was Project 
X, someone else suggested it was Transmeta.,.? 

I'm certain it is not Project X and almost cer- 
tain it is not Transmeta. For a start, both these 
are far too well known! 

This Superchip, who's actually making it? 

As far as we can figure out from the hints 
end snippets, it is a company, or a subsidiary 
unit, or an investment combined set up for the 
specific purpose of making a chip to meet the 
needs of future computing. We suspect that it is 



backed financially by a number of companies 
with a strong interest in this line of develop- 
ments, perhaps not companies not normally 
associated with CPU manufacture. 

We have been told that they have been 
working for some time on this and have a good 
number of very skilled staff on the project. As 
for any names or places, you know as much as 
we do. 

Oh go on, you can tell me, I won't say. 

No, really, we don't know. 

Will the new Amiga run old Amiga software? 

Yes, but it is not is quite clear how yet- It 
could be a software emulator along the lines of 
UAE, which should run pretty well on a future 
Amiga (the nature of the superchip makes it 
very good at emulation, or it may be transpar- 
ent, as 68k emulation is on PPC Macintoshes. 
The latter would certainly be preferable. 






25 



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3D (liuhl-SimgLator featuring 
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Foigot 1hose boring ■flat" 3D- 

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DELUXE PAINT 5 
DltUMt Paint as a product -3 
the envy 1f»e trie whole PC 
wurtd, It's features end ease of 
use are not matched by any 
Other graphics package entier 
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Paint &, tha latest release, is 

nn exception. Deluxe Peinl S is without 
a doubt l**e taslest paim package available an the 
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aH Ihe Amiga s graphics modes Deluxe Paint S 
includes tna most powerful yet simples! to use ani- 
mation learure you could imagine Direcl support lot 
all the Amiga's animation formats are included as 
well as of course 1he industry slandard IFF picture 
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EXCLUSIVE* Supplied vrltti 9 free bonus CD rMrr- 
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Qrdev: COSOO £17.99 

ELASTIC DREAMS 
Contains both PPC and Arfliga 
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Onto: C0604 £4999 <} " 

ART STUDKJ PRO 

mage cataloguer, cortveder 
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54,CloCk*i*er C2.99 

AdUvt n-incl bandiog puzzle ganv 

CD590 Fields 01 Glory L14.99 

CD501 .Cannon FO<klef £A99 

CD493.Suoer Skidmarks £12.99 

O&aw.Simon the Sorcerer £14 $9 

Ott\#r Mitts jvaA'jflki... . 

.Utafi jpf suiriiHi tor u8s on A 'SW'S 

v«lfj CD dOUdniv! 

ARCADE CLASSICS PLUS 
Arcade Classics PIUS includes 

hundreds ot varialionit Pi ul ! 

the Classic arcade games. 

such as 
PScmar? 
fnyaders. TrGA. 
GflJIaxjarTS , Frosffey. rempesf, C&t 
convfiriroris.. Q-Bert. Trail Bfazftr. 
ScramWe, Pfrl^-PuVJjj. Pengo. 
Misjyio command. Efteafcour. 
Bezerk. Donkey Kong. Tetris and 
tons more gireat games. 

Order CD7B E14.9B 

THE GAMFS ROOM 
The Games 
Room is an 
cnginal compi- 
laHrf ot 
Gambling 
games It 
covers every- 
Ihnig from Fruit 
MMhklH 1o Card GajmeS, includkng 
Ktandrke. Poker, Solitaire. Rummy, 
Blackjack, and Floutetle, Darts. 
Bingo, Pool. Checkers, Chess, 
Backgammon, Dominoes. Various 
Board Games like Monapoty and 
Clueoo. Masterniind. Pub Quo ■ 
and it wealth of other Casino relat- 
ed gamas and 1ar mere... 

Order: GD45i £12.99 

NOTHING BUT TETRIS 

Around 100 variations of the 
all-time class*; name Tetris". 
All the games are runneJQIe 
Iroflv 1he C0- 
Wakes a great dill tor anyone' 




lp'>'< 



IS 











*4r«»-- 



Order CD>48 £9-99 






15O0 WAV SOUND EFFECTS 
1 ,SD0 >jl Vit ti jjhflsl nualty sompleo all 
cal*gwiHid. IncLHBS A/wiB.l5, Nsli.nv 

HmiW, H«mn Crasti, fjpkiskini etc. MC 

Onrer. CD6l6£9.99 

MICK DAVIS' CARTOON CUPART 

Ovof iOO Eidudive mono wrlcon 
iiriaije&.irvil you can us? Eortlpl^Kly Rr-ffjibf' 
f'M Al urc alike fiOtUSt slamlaid. 

OrciFf ■ CD2.K r rare 

SOUND EFFECTS VOL:1 

Over t 5. CO" 1le* Inckjfci scund eflMlfl- 1ro<n 
.ill wnr lh« plact. kwlirfnjj AnlnnH. Nutune. 

Horrur. Hto&fl Cretin, Ei;ik»iDn5 B4D. «e 

Outer. CDtesx £9.9S 

DESKTOP VIDEO CD V0L:2 

Arinn Dsskltp Vckic CD \\iluri* 2 BrMi 
hnndrccs, cf insflaDyles Ot Vufan retalcd 
baadrops lonts, umpkH, and dip imagos 
Order CD404K £9.99 

FONTA MANIA 

Owir 2tlC0 Anik>a Bllniap. ftwuscnpl ami 
AdAbe ronts 1w u» t\ any Aniisa appl&ilicn 

Order: OmiS EB.99 



SIMON THE SDRCERER 
"Simon tha S-orCOrer" is one 
of the Amiga's most loved 
graphic adventures.-The 
animal>on Has io be seen 

14 be believed ." CU Amiga 
The yOitt at timon is CJirra 
Barrie (Sir BrilsS), 1 1 

Srrifabi 1 ! for Ainia* CD / C032 ** 
Cyder: CD563 C14.99 

SIXTH SENSE >ll llaVpilllll 

: ; i :i;;.! 'ii:-.i-! invasagations is an 
emezing new Amlgui arcade 
adventure, laaluririg 32 loca- 
tions, lull character dialog. 3 
diflerenl worlds, many interac- 
tive characters, puzzles and 
more. Trus game seta new 
Standards lor Amiga gaming 
Easert on the classic style 

of LucasArts Graphic 
Adventures. 





MINI OFFICE 

This suoerb easy to use office « 

is greet tor the home and small r>. 
ness. II includes a Word Processor 
wtlh a spell checker. Database 
Su".-:iilslK*fl and more. 
Onder. rMJfy;DFflL7E £17.99 

BLITZ 6 ASIC 2.1 

A rH'sl generalicn BASIC with lea 

tunes borrowed 1rom PASCAL, C if* 

Olhers. Program any type d SoftwaN 
with more power than ever belore 
Complete with ful manual. 
Includes Ml manuals. i ■ 

QOS&: SJJTZ £17.99 

DELUXE PAINTS 

Deluxe Paint 5 is wlhouf a deubl "« 
fastest painl package availahle on 
the Amige. Deluice Paint S include* 
the most powerful yet simplest 1o \M 
animetion feature you could iffi&can* 
Includes 1ul manuals. m 

Oide;. DPAINT5 £17.99 

info NEXUS 

Low cost tile rmnagement system 
rename.ccpy, duplicate, delete filet 
with ease recognise* dozens of file 

types, shows and plays nauSC. san 
pies. arwualKins and images. 
Order: INFONEXUS £4.99 

INTER SPREAD 

Interspreari supports over TEN MIL- 
LION cells at once. Dale can be rep 
resented graphically using pie Chart 

and bar graphs etc. 

OlAlr.- INTEFI&FflEAa £5 

AMI-PC LINKUP 

Network your Amiojs up Io a PC and 
make use of ALL it's drives, 
Including: CD-POM, Zip, Hard drive 
High-Density Floppy Btc, etc, 

enter flMt-PC LiNKOP C17M 

MOUSE-IT 

Allows connection of virtually any Pi 
mouse, Trackball c* poinding device 
to the Amiga. Plugs into your seoal 



Qrte,- MQUSEIT £4.99 

INTER BASE 

Quick and easy 10 use, Interbase is 
the perfect solution when it comes I 
Amiga databases, essily transfer 
data 'ram imerbase into olher sup- 
porirxl applications, print labels eic 
Oroef.- INTERBASE fS 

AVId PROFESSIONAL 

Tne fastest and most powerful AVI 
player lor the Amiga Includes ver- 
sions lor AS00+ i A60D / Al 2CX) ,' 
A4000 and A5CX10. 

Onto-: AVID Around £15 (Cattl 

BURN IT V2.1 

BurnlT is the Amiga's most powerk 
CD-R burning software, Can create 
audio and data CD's. Easy 10 uS» 
and supports W+ CO-R dmres. 
Or*?r: BfjffMfT Standard: £34.99 
Order. BURNIT Pr&m&artat: EE&.9S 

TURBO PRINT 9M 
The tfigentous primer driver SySlerr 
TurboPrint prints Ihe ft* colour ape 
Irum directly from your lavourile SO 
ware package. Print at 1he very b« 

quakty! fSuppuits ail fie lal«4 prinhorc. 
Onter TURSOPfTMUT ; £39.99 



t-yf ■« ,:. . ■CiJl..rcTf!i'.v 

fcnhgiliOtWOOCltDK 

2n\b lain. 4mb RenoniiT«BiiJ«lL 

OflHtff.- 00430 £29.99 



.. **r. 




! *^ 



Oi^lpr.CrX9f £19.99 



ANIME BABES SPECIAL EDITION 
Thousands of high ojuality Manga 
style GIF Images. Conlams scenes 
ol nuaty end sex. 



Bpi>\ to: tusl £25 



ANIME BABES VOLUME ONE 

Thousands of high quality Manga 

Style GIF Images. 

Order. CDf9fK £14.99 





m 



TEENS <S THEIR TOYS 

Hundreds of quality GIF Images 
Order- C0S9B £15,00 

GIRLS WHO LIKE GIRLS 

Hundreds 01 htgh quality images t 
acts of X3CX (Guess'l STRICTLY 
ADULTS ONLY! 

Ontex- CD2S4 £10 

HOT HOUSE WIVES 

Around 1 000 Adult images 01 *s- 

leetly Stvot photo's of house wiui 

(*Hh no clothes on) 

Order: COS92 £19 

ADULT SENSATION VOL: 5 

Volume 5 consists ol dozens 01 
Adull refaled games like. Strip 
Pc*er, Telris Sbjs. Adurl Fairy 
Tales, Friday Night Pool and mc 
Orlrtr. CD5S7 £)9.9Sr 



Tbrrcn -AOuT lirres- are stnttft' for purchase by Adul 
over me age of tSOrtry. We rtotd oner SO drflerrx 
Advlr rnltei in stock, So please caff for a £SfatoQirf 




% 



us* of ice Suite 

s and Small bus 
ford Processor 
Database, 
ire. 
Ff7.» 



VSIC wrth tea- I 
PASCAL C and 
type of software 
n evfir Cie1c*e. 
snual. 

L 



K 



lout a doubt the 
i available on 
airil 5 includes 
t simplest to us* 
J could imagine. 

99 



■ment system, 
itc, delete files 
i dozens ol tils 
iys rnusic, sam- 
images. 
'1.99 



over' TEN MIL- 
a1a can be rsp- 
jsing pis charts 



£S 



jp to a PC and 

Jrwes. 

3p. Hand rjrltfe 

itC, Sit. 

' £17.99 



virtually any PC 
oinlinn (toviCe 
ito your serial 



I, Interbsse i$ 
'en it Comes to 
iily transfer 
to other sup- 
ir'1 labels etc 



Kwerful AVI 
ndudes rar- 



5 (Cam 



rrost powerful 
I, Qm create 
Easy to us# 
R drives 

d: £$4.99 
ionar. fflS 99 



Irivar system: 
lit colour spec- 
favourite soft- 
me uiery best 

Qfe^l p'inbcni 



4 

IT'S 

■ if Images. 



1LB 

*tv images ot 

STRICTLY 



ifjesof dfa- 
house wives 



fOL;5 

Inzens of 

.ill Fairy 

M« and more 



FLASHROM VOLUME 2 
Tans at EmulslOfS COuanng. 
C64, Spectajm, Amslred, 
Alan ST BBC, Clrj and loads 
more 
^mtter.-CjjeMrrd.ss 

SPECCY CLASSfX 9B 

Play over 3000 Classic 
Spodrum Games en your 
Amiga Includes the latest 
Speeirurn Emu akors and 
thousands of Games 

Oir3er:COSSJ £10 

C64 GAMES ARCHIVE 

The re-compiled C64 Games 
CD includes around 15,PQQ all' 
time classic Commodore 64 
games. It's very easy 1r> use 
and the CD ha* a complete 
index of every game, 
arttot. CD)S! OS 99 

I 3* * 85 *!•*„ Available C £1 r>.S» c> V 





BEWC COLLECTION 3 
The Epic Collecoon Volumes 
features well Over 6O0mb ol 
the vary latest and on y h-ssl 
Amiga gsmes, tools, images 
and music. II also contains 
over m disks ot educationaf 
sofftrar*. J 

Order: CfXCHjr ft* 99 som &, jij* GW 

176IT LEVEL 6 f 
The very latest 17BIT disks 
specialty compiled by Quartz 
All the best titles are hens, 
Through an easy to use inter- 
lace you nave access to 
aratind 1OQ0 brand mm 
Amiga disks all categorised 
into various themes. 
v C0495 £14.99 

CONVERTER SUITE GOLD 
Hundreds of the very best tools and 
applications for acmuflrtinrj picture 

inim;iiiuji files, sound and text 
I files from one format to another, 
Tools tncluited tor Amiga & PC 
' CD624 £3.99 




'fa 




£*£ 



Sftlt? * SAE far j ramri'dP usi ci . 



AMIGA Survivor fanzine 

nets, PtBifiewB & novhma i 
Around 20 pages *i|h all the lalast 
software and hardware reviewed 
along with news from around the 
World' Regular colums include: 
Weosrte of (he Month, Aminet 
Ramble, The Trashcan (Software 
avoid) Magnetic Fiction, Joe fl Ami Comic 
■>d leads more. Jsf fesus avtaflabfe let June 
r- Monthly. .. Order. Sumirtr issus 1.2 etc 



ES5EHTWL SOFTWARE 



*12DG HARD DRIVE PREP 4 INSTALLER E7 

fAPPG/ARCHOS CD-ROM SOFTWARE t? 

tog HISC PRINTER DRIVERS E3 

CANON PRINT STUDIO E3 

SQUIRREL CD-ROM SOFTWARE Eli 

ATA-PI SOFTWARE £f 






ANY MOUSE Of} JOYSTICK: 
ANY SINGLE ITEM JUST £10 OR 
ANY TWO FOB JUST a$ 



^ 



OFFICIAL AMIGA MOUSE 
High quality 400dpi 'official' 
Amiga mouse with Amiga 
mouse- mat. 
Order. AMfJf jr 




ZIP-STICK 

Stylish and very strong steel-shaft. 
mmimlcro-SwilEhed joystick. 
OnOar: ZIPSTICX 



u 




SCIENCE PACK 

Cove's Astronomy, Biology, 
Chemistry, Physics, Fractals, 
Geography Mathematics end 
toads more. 
Order CDSSO £t$99 



UFO ENCOUNTERS 

Thousands Of documents and 
Images mat you should not 
see. Covers Rosswell. 
Ai&ductions. UFO Sightinojs 
and much mora, 




CRUISER JOYSTICKS 
Crinsur Black' (Slandardf 
'Cruiser TgrtW' (Auto Fire) 
■Critter Mufti Coloured 1 
Oridej- CRUISER 1. 2 or 3 



Qmer.-CDITQ £14.99 




C032/ AMIGA JOY PAD 
The official! Am>gaCD32 Joypad. 
OWE PERORDEPt' Oiffiftr 32JOY 



EPH 




EPIC ENCVCLOPECMA 19« 

The firsi edition of the Amiga's 
answer to Encarta, The t89B 
version is tar more advanced, 

but ins. version will work on 

AMY 2mb Amiga. 



gx SP 

^^^ Ore 



SPEEOKING ANALOGUE STrCK 
Moro cornfortabte handling, shorter, 
tester end more fw'eciSC joyalick 
than any Other. The SpeedKing is 
also vinually mdestructifjlft with 
its steel shall 

On*x- SPEEDMM5 AtiALOd 



OF 



COMPETITION PRO JOYSTICKS 
'Competition Pro. SO00 

'Comp. Pro. 5000 MINI 
"Comp Pro. Clear 1 
*Oomp. Pro. Clear MINI' 
Cater COMP t. 2. 3 or 4 






QUICKJOY FOOT PEDALS 

A great rywelty lor arry 
racing game addict. You 

simply plug the perms 
into your joystick port, and 

plug your joystick Into the back Ol the 

pedals, Order: PEDALS 



AM ATTACK JOYSTK 

Ergononmc hand grip- designed for 

better conlrol, 1 tire buHOPS. High 

SpCCO aulo-fire. Extra long lead. 

OVr/cr AFRlCk' 



'■<0*E GREA T PEHWHEI 



VGA MONITOR ADAPTOR 
Plugs m1o your Monitor and allows 
use of any SVGA PC monitor on 
the Amiga, WB3 recommended. 
r>def: VGA £14.99 



SPEEDMQU5E MINI ^^ 

Up 1o 8000dpi. Fully mcroswllched, 
Supplied Mith MowselT 
Oder; MOUSEMIHt Only £14,99 



ROSOSHIFT MACH2 
Aulo swilcfiing (oystick'mouse 
I "V aotaptorfswrlcriBT. 

^ Otter ROBOSHIFT £9.99 

SPRINT PAD $G 
i Stylish Sliwi-line transparent 
' joypad for the Amiga, 

Ortto- SPRINTPAD £!4.99 ^A 

3D SOUND BOX 
Gives your Amiga real 3D 
stereo sound Complete with 

input cables, power-supply 
and damn disk. Works with any 
program. OrtS$r SGuttdboi £19.99 
to MOUSE IT 

^[l Plug virtually any PC Serial 
i[ mouse, trackball or Pen into 
"" your Amiga. 

Onfcr Mmis&iT £4.99 

AMIGA TOUCH PAO 

ERrKnates the use ol a mouse... 
simply move your linger oyer the 

touch sensitive pad. 
Comas supplied with MouselT. 
rj«d&. touchpao £3S #9 






Or*r CDSSSx £5 

~~^^ EPIC ENCYCLOPEDIA 

J THE PARANORMAL 
^j^_^^»l An eicilin^) new rnullimedia 
■ I Arnigy based CD-ROM featur- 

I ing high-res AQA graphics 
I throuphout. COvenng subjects 
WfcJjM hkri i.lFCs A Aliens. 
wk^k^A^^^^^ Slrangeiiie fBfgtoat, 

Locnneas monsr*r eic). Mysticism. 
Mint ovtr rptller. Uylhs snd Legends ano more, 
1h«s CD promises to give you an "experience' . Also 
tor the first lime- On an Amiga multimedia GO. Ihere 
are true "AVI'' files (Audio 8 
Video!. Hundreds r>l colour 
images, masses of AVl's, 
and animations, hundreds of I 
voice-Ov«rS, over AH min- 
utes cf preservations around | 
■300 Subject synopsis", and 
hundreds ot "cross refer- 
enced' arttates. ' 
Order. CU223*. £14.99 Bout h.' ji^f £?5 
T 

EPIC ENCYCLOPEDIA 

The Epic Interactive 
Encyclopedia is a completely 
updated product to the extent 
that d now indudss around 
20,000 subjects 1 ' . It features 
a superh new updated multi- 
media interlace with new 
colour scheme, online help, hundreds of 

film clips, images, SOwnd sample* and subject infor- 

mafion text. It supports a multitude at nevi features 

including: Colour images. Fulhscraan filmdips in 

anim and AVI lannats*. National anthems and a 

unique Inter-ACT' 'n.iin.-c- 

which alkjrt's you 10 irXerad 

wiffi cArfain subjects like: 

Draughts, etc. A superb 

reference and educational 

wle tor the wiboie family, 

1996 EdrDan: CD2S2 £5.00 

1937 Edition: COS0PC f W 99 I 

'■1998 Edrtwn- CD*62 Et9.66 

1996 E(*lfcn - ASQQt.<A6QO/A riOOHO, JWie- ""^ 

IS9? EtMrcn ■ AGA Amiga vrtit\ HO *nfrnwn 

fSW EOWon - AOA Aflfya mH\ HO. 4rnt>trmm. 030 c 

TeewrvTTGnded. £.■***** £^n 



KIDS RULE OKI 

Includes three children's games : 

Postman Pal. Pcpeye and Sooty & 

Sweep. 

Owisv: OS09 E9 f 

KIDS RULE OK 2 

Includes three more children's 
games : Bully's Sporting: Dan's, 
Popeye'S Wrestling artd Dinosaur 
Detective Agency. flaf*cf90% 

Oraer. QStSx £9 

PLAYDAYB 

The Ofttcial Playtfeys as seen on 
BBC is available now and includes 
T3 dirferenl children's actrvrlies^ h 
covers : Mumbers. Letters, CotdurS, 
Shepes, Sounds and mora. 
Order- OS 15 L9 

PLAYDAY5 PAINT 

Craale your own Birthday cards, 
Banners and Calendars. Draw your 
Own pictures and colour them or sim- 
ply colour in the pictures Supplied. 

Order OSOfifS 

THOMAS' COLLECTION 

Three great little children's games, 
each featuring Themes ma Tank 
Engine. Ages .! i 






Order: QS20* £9 




SOOTYS PAINT BOX 
Create yfjur Own Brrthdey cards, 
Banners and Calendars. Draw your 
own pduros and colour them or sim- 
ply colour in the pictures Supplied. 



Cvoer. OS J a* E9 



^■^I^^MI 

€ f 



DEnj 



nninn 



4MB AfaOORAUSOARD 

Duratjle 4 megabyle ram card 
wilh clock lor the AtajfJ, gives 
you e total ot fVil- ram. 

Orchr- 4MBEXP £39. 99 * £7 P&P 




CABLES ETC rs*ki tor 



AMlfiA - AMIGA PARNET CU.BB 

AMIGA - PHILIPS 8833 mk2 t1S,99 

AMIGA -WW 7 E12.99 

AMIGA PRINTER CABLE O.SB 

IS" A 1 ktiO HARDORl VE CA 9L E £1 9,9* 

2.5" A60a,'A12Qg HARD DRIVE CABLE £9.99 

AMIGA - AMIGA OR PC (TWIN CABLE} £14.99 



'Spend (25 on CD's 

arm t«»o<!se on* of 

i he fall-owing tree. 

Spmni tsrj and 

choose any two elc, 







WORKBENCH 3,0 
Vh3uOm WorUmr&i, 

■tanp ?■"■■■' i 

LocavB.Fonts and 
U M BJ A bargain 

Jf;i::i ! !" -I 1 ? 
HwUnfl ! 1 /or 1MB C Vf ■ HMrUfnc'A 104 In AS3ff^*S« O. W 



COMPATIBLE INKJET CARTRIDGES 



EDAM 

m/4m.Cnkxn W— TW DM L»m»!«» E1S.D9 

lH** CtHwr U ttVH tm \tm*Y. Epun«2C(N2 ESM 

Canon 

OJCJDin iBlnr" I Cmv BCt}l BK. f*M 

■JC4a» (CokuiL e»» 

Cam UJIM BKCH-V. £3 K(U 
ttiii fa ju*r i M m *M*rnpir & ■ 



r 



j 



J 



W.J 



"j Open Mgn - Sat 

B> ii.-f.-ficm-.il Lt, Vou'r* Supporting the Amiga. Visitors jgl 

Sortwunj - H*rtiw*f* ■ PvlprieralM - Comumabie* Welcome 1 



ic»pm.K 










CANNON FODDER 

OR 

1000 C£4 GAMEZ! 

Over 1000 classic 

C64 Games A 

Emulairjr 

Oifler: FCDS0? or FCDS29 

SOFTWAHE EXPLOSION 
GOOnb of Ion qjualily data. 
Images, over 30O lexlures. 
Objects, Samples. Modules, 
Games. SCO Letters., Demos 
plus, a great deal more. 



OflS&r. FCD449 

SOFTWARE EXPLOSION 2 
Brand Ne* release includes 
torn ol Mid) Files, Images. 
Colour Fonts. Tutorials, Virtual 
Computer Pels, and a whole 
host of other slutf. 

Order: FCD5BD 



»«? Epic ■ BSS House. AreaSO, Cheney Manor Trading Est. 

Swindon, Wilts, SN2 2PJ. UK JJL 

+44 1793 514187 '^'/ 
Fan 

+44 1793 514188 .l£/ 



■ epicmarketing®clia(in,net 



www. eptctrtarKeti ng . ltd . net 
,1? FREEfoOf? 0500 131 486 or +44 1793 4909B8 



iwlir AeW£ 
r 50 .tf/itereni 
a fiataiooue. 



J 



■: ilpMfranui*iiiuiM OwiMt ft lor bm Urn an [2 f* iHUd Iwn . jkutl M u imnnj Uj » hj f 

" *COun- ! rtjo«Tn>j.x,Srti»in-rua>iMi UM>iMnlwl«Maiii*l»l [U\.-uir v .K<i,.:'i;i>:-i- 
W*i wftmo U««» mn sralin mH, a» ana (fi» «5M . Omrtt* w* <iK«.MjiX],*1HiHi: 
s*-a a LaE ki j to .(, t *t hUUiuc or rem jnd iai»«.r»-« *™j™ mu ChKUKSlKuMMnjaipJuUi uePIC 
jm mi [ij LiU (.Tum) f run « (1m,. hh BU VHdy duma i>«i om mtn j« ^ms«s Sojudml iMlw, U Hut. 



^ 



Heed Office (UKJ 

BSS Hrjiisfl - Uf1lt22, 
Art'LisO. Cheney Manor 
Trading EsL Swlndcn. f 
Tel: +44(0)1793 514185 S 



Australian Office 
3* Forest Road, 
Healheote. NSW, 2233 
Tel: +61 {r>) J9520 9606 

German Office 
Hlr&chiUBT SlreSse 9 
72070 Tutoirgett 

Tal; +49 7071 400492 

Fax: 1-49 7071 400493 



cicbit CM&a^f^f UHioomi 




Pi EASE 



AH 



THE TOTAL VALUE OF THE GOODS ARE £^_ 

PLUS POSTAGE OF E 

SO THE TOTAL OF MY ORDER IS E_ 

MY NAME AND DELIVERY ADDRESS IS... 



IEL 



AMIGA MODEI 



I WISH TO PAY BY.... 

CHEQUE n POSTAL ORDER n 
CARD NUMBER 



;reditcafioq 

•*T EXP 



ISS_ 



FEATURE 



Video Toaster 

Pops Up Agair 



It sparked a desktop 
video revolution in 
America but never 
made an impact east 
of Boston- However, 
with prices lower 
than ever, NewTek's 
Video Toaster now 
looks a very attrac- 
tive prospect for all 
of us. 



It's the card that started the 'desktop 
video' movement- It's the card thai 
made en lire rooms full of TV equip- 
ment look overblown, overpriced, and 
out of date. It's the card that put the 
Amiga on the map in the US. However, while 
in the States, the Video Toaster has been 
the Amiga's lifelong bussom buddy, to most 
non-American Ami gas it's a complete 
stranger, NewTek's recent price cuts could 
mean that it's soon to find a lot more friends 
across the globe. 

If you've never seen or used a Toaster 
you've probably been fobbed oft with a 
vague description of it along the lines of "it 
does video". OK. but you'll probably want to 
know exactly what it "does" to video. In a 
nutshell, it's a video card that acts as a real- 
time multiple input switcher, wiper, effects 
generator, genlock, keyer. mixer and titler, 
and it does all of this at broadcast TV 
quality. 

The trouble is that it has the rather 
marked flaw of being designed to work only 
with Ihe North American/Japanese NTSC 
video standard, which explains why the rest 
of the world hasn't got in on the act. The 
explanations for why there has never been a 
PAL Toaster vary wildly, but the story seems 
to revolve around two critical details. For 
Starters, the Toaster relies rather heavily on a 
video processing chip which is unavailable 
in PAL format. But even more importantly, 
the Toaster works its magic with a lot of 
trickery and guile which relies on the charac- 




teristics ot NTSC which do not exist in PAL. 
While there certainty may be PAL tricks 
which don't exist for NTSC, nobody has 
exploited these in the same way NewTek 
has with their Toaster. So r the bottom line 
remains, if you want to Toast, you have to 
do it in NTSC. 

Of course, NTSC and PAL are not insur- 
mountable barriers - in evidence because 
PAL countries can watch Friends and 
Americans can watch Doctor Who. But 
because of the hassle and expense, relative- 
ly few people have dared to wonder about 
using a Toaster in Europe, Today, however, 
with video equipment in general and the 
Toaster in particular dropping rapidly in 
price, it may be time to take a close look at 
the crowded little wonder card from Kansas. 



The Toaster revealed 

So, other than generating a market for thii 
party add-ons with unfortunate names 
(Marmalade, The Toaster Oven et all what 
the fuss all about? What does a Toaster d 
that might be remotely interesting to a se 
ous video producer, let alone the average 
dabbler? 

The Toaster itself is a monstrous card 
that fits in the video slot of any suitably 
equipped Amiga. It has a few 'sandwich' 
boards, mating it a very large and heavy 
thing indeed. In most Amigas{such as 
3000s, 4000s, 400QTs. and most tower c< 
versions) the sheer size of the board bloc 



FEATURE 



r 



Box of tricks 



The core of the Video Toaster is the 'switcher', which 
essentially replicates a television switching board. 
The incoming video from the four inputs can be rout- 
ed directly through, switched instantaneously from 
one to another, or 'A/B rolled' using one of hundreds 
of effects. The applications are as simple as using the 
quick-switch abilities to run a talk show or newscast- 
style production with two of three cameras set up 
•cross a studio, to using the Toaster to switch live 
between a camera and an AV device (like a VQR, a 
laserdisc, or a computer) for presentations and 
instructional videos. All of the functions can be 
mouse or keyboard driven - at one point, stickers 
were available to paste over every single key to show 
each function at a glance, giving serious Toaster users 
easily identifiable rainbow keyboards. 

When the taJk show or news ends, the Toaster has 
a built in character generator which can be used to 
roll the credits. If this sounds like a minor point, many 
Toasters were sold exclusively to replace dedicated 
character generators which themselves cost thou* 
sands of dollars. 

The applications for using a Toaster live are enor- 
mous. Many small TV stations and public access 
cable centres base their entire studios around 
Toasters, to do everything from the news to transi- 
tions between programs and commercials and back 
again. They are also used in the production of the 
commercials themselves But you don't have to be on 
television or videotape to appreciate the capabilities. 
Stage performances with visual aids have put the 
Toaster to work - a recent 'bioplay' on the first 
American film star (and sex scandal participant] Fatty 
Arbuckle made extensive use of the Toaster to show 
film clips and headlines on a projected screen while 
the performers told the story. 



Due Dl Hie 
Toaster's trBiuh 
tianal Effects in 
acini. A simple 
animation 
becDjn** J rsttwr 
Elaborate W*y Hi 
switching Ireitt 
one fife* clait- 

fltl It Hither. 




c 



a second slot. From the outside, you'd 
hardly notice anything unusual - six BNC- 
style connectors poke out from the back- 
plate. Four are for video inputs, another 
is the main (out} display, and the last is 
used as the preview monitor. Since visual 
effects typically involve some sort of 
transition from one image to another, 
preview holds the image you will be 
moving to. 

The Video Toaster comes in two 
flavours - the original, and the Video 
Toaster 4000. The significant difference 
is that the 4000 version takes advaniage 
of AGA, allowing for more colourful 
effects and animations. It also is the best 
way to use the Flyer editing board. And 
since it was designed after the release of 
the A3000 and A4000, unlike the original, 
it is better suited for fitting in more types 
of machines - stories are legendary of 
the hassles of fitting an original Toaster 
in any machine other than a 2000, simply 
because they don't have the generous 
amount of internal space available to 
2000 users. Speed and memory require- 
ments vary depending on your patience 
level and how much work you need the 
Toaster to do - an 040 and J6MB of 
memory, along with a good-sized hard 
drive to store lots of animated effects, is 
considered a very well equipped Toaster 
workstation. 

As seen on TV 

Ihe Toaster is well equipped for live 
broadcast, closed circuit, or live-to- tape 
productions (with little or no editing after 
the fact}. But it can also be used: to ere 
ate standalone special effects - one of 
the classic demonstrations involves 
using the Toaster's 'static fuzz' transition 
to beam objects in and out from a live 
video image. The trick takes just a few 
seconds to prepare, and while it won't be 
mistaken for the effects being produced 
at Industrial Light and Magic these ^^™ 
days, it's just one example of 
the power that has been 
placed inside a humble desk- 
top computer. For those 
results, firing up Lightwave is 
the answer. Wow that 
Lightwave has been sold in 
standalone versions (and for 
other platforms) for so many 
years, some have lost track of 
the fact that for years 
LightWave required a Toaster. 
Other switcher effects are 
perhaps not so practical, such 
as the cows which fall from 
the sky and pile up, obscuring 
the image until they fly off. 
revealing the new one. With 
special software, new transi- 
tions can be created, and the 
results are so impressive that 
it's been used, quite often, on 



broadcast TV The long-running Home 
Improvement u$ed ne Toaster for its cus- 
tom transitions i. usually at least two or three 
per episode). 

'o round uU the package, the software 
includes a paint program, and a mode called 
ChromaFX. typically used to generate wacky 
colour-cycling effects, good for anything 
from DJs to budget sci-fi producers. The 
paint program, Toasterpgint, is essentially 
just a HAM paint program and Is not very 




'ADBTNITE'NilfST-RAXrZtKiRADE 
R)R EVERY SERIOUS TOASTER USER? 

Find Out Why! 

Ibe hesl arherl igr Toaster - Wrut its users have achieved. 

well respected - fortunately, you can also 
incorporate graphics created in other pro- 
grams as long as they have been converted 
to the Toaster's Framestore format, which 
many image processors will do for you. 

Like a real studio, the Toaster also pro- 
vides an entry point for other video technol 
ogy. For example, out of the box the Toaster 
provides 'luminance keying' which is a more 
primitive version of the 'blue screen' (or 
chrominance keying) used for so many spe- 
cial effects. With a relatively inexpensive 
add-on box. the Toaster gains quite 
respectable blue screen capability. Third- 
party manufacturers who have designed 



NTSC vs. PAL 



Video is a very technical medium. There is so much 
going on beyond what you see on the telly that it 
gets to be mind-boggling if you really start to break 
down the science of it. But because the Amiga was 
built so intimately in tuna with video, many of us 
have at (east a basic grasp of the differences- 

The most important differences between NTSC 
and PAL are a question of resolution vs. refresh rate. 
In NTSC countries (primarily the Americas and 
Japan), video refreshes at 60 Hz (cycles per second) 
versus 50 Hz in PAL countries. The trade off is resolu- 
tion - PAL's is somewhat finer. Of course, in their 
home countries these formats look perfectly natural 
to the natives, but overseas travellers sometimes 
claim they can see a difference. The difference is more 
pronounced when using a PAL monitor to display 
NTSC or vice-versa: for example, in the US, display- 
ing PAL results in a rather pronounced flicker. 



20 







complementary video products can add their 

controls directly to thr;- Toaster's own inter- 
face screen. And Jher there's the Video 
Toaster Flyer. 

Price drops 

Recently, Toaster systems have begun to 
sell for vastly reduced prices. The original 
Video Toaster card was introduced at over 
USS25O0 (roughly £1500). The original Flyer 
price was US$4000 (roughly £2500). and 
that of course excluded the actual Amiga, 
plus video-grade hard drives for the Flyer. 
Now. NewTek offers packages based on an 
A40O0T, plus Toaster and Flyer cards for 
USS5QQQ (£3100) all told. Video drives for 
the Flyer are still your own lookout, but the 
savings are still tremendous, and of course, 
hard drive prices tend to continue steadily 



The Flyer 



The Flyer was NewTek's attempt to do for video edit- 
ing what they had already done for live broadcast - 
make it cheap, good, and on a single 1 card you can 
plunk into an Amiga. As much as the Toaster can do, 
if you want to create a complete production, involv- 
ing lots of footage shot over many days in many loca- 
tions, it can't help you put it all together, even though 
its switching and effects probably came in handy 
while you recorded all that tape. 

Putting it together in a seamless, attractive man- 
ner is another story. Traditional editing consists of 
multiple video tape machines, which are run through 
dedicated editing and effects consoles. The consoles 
can stop or roll your various tapes of footage on com- 
mand and on the fly while the 'program' (final prod- 
uct) tape records. Baca use videotape is a linear 
medium, this can be a tedious process. The Flyer, like 
other nonlinear editors, allows you to digitise all of 
your recordings onto the computer and then chop it 
all up and reassemble it in whatever style you choose 
before o inputting your final product. In the computer, 
videographers gain the same luxury film editors have 
always had - they can literally tear their work apart 
frame by frame and reassemble it, but until comput- 
ers and products like the Flyer came along, there was 
no way to break video out of the streams of tape, 
And just like that, the desktop TV station turned into 
the desktop TV station plus editing facility All you do 
is put some high-grade high-storage hard drives on 
the Flyer bus, and you're ready to make serious stuff. 




downward in price- 
per-megabyte {or in 
this case, gigabyte). 
This has also cre- 
ated a lot of pres- 
sure on the rather 
active used market 
for Toasters and 
related gear. An orig- 
inal Video Toaster 
has been known to 
sell for just over 
£200. This has 
allowed all sorts of 
people who could 
only dream of one 
day owning a 
Toaster to take the 
plunge and have one 

in their home. At that sort of price, if you're 
interested in experimenting with video, it 
suddenly becomes very tempting. 

Technical considerations 

There are other considerations to make. 
Video, like most creative media, is the sort 
of pursuit where you can spend as much 
money as you have and still not have 
"enough stuff". Without a video source and 
a place to record your video, you have very 
little to work with, unless you plan to use it 
solely with computer graphics to some sort 
of live video output, like an LCD projector or 
monitor. This is fine, but an underuse of the 
Toaster's abilities. 

When you start feeding multiple video 
signals to the Toaster, it's necessary to 
make sure they all arrive 'at the same time'. 
The precise technical explanation -for this 
issue {known as video sync) is beyond this 
article, but it's suffice to say that devices 
known as time-base correctors (TBCs) take 
care of this problem for you. The quality of 
these units varies wildly as does the price - 
you could spend £100 or less, or well over 
£1000 for professional-grade units. For 
most purposes, though, tower end TBCs 
serve just fine. 

The quality of your input and output does 
matter, Using regular VHB tape to go in and 
out is not going to be pleasing to the eye. 
With each component your video moves 
through, the signal depletes, so it's best to 
try to at least begin with good quality video. 
For early experimentation, VHS is as good 
as anything, but you won't get gorgeous 
results. 

What you'll need 

None of this matters unless you get around 
the problem of the Toaster not being a PAL 
device. But it's well known thai Toasters are 
in use all over Europe and beyond - one 
American dealer distinctly remembers 
putting together a Toaster/Flyer package for 
a member of the royal family of Oman. 
Because it is something of an underground 
affair and not without certain disadvantages 
and extra expense, using a Toaster in 
Europe is not an exact science, but with the 




help of Chuck Baker and John Fletcher of 
NewTek and Dan Sorenson of Clackamas 
Computers, here is a thumbnail sketch of 
what you need if you want to get started. 

* A video-slot equipped Amiga system. 
This means a 2000, 3000, 4000, 4000T, or an 
A 1200 with tower bus board that includes a 
full video slot implementation. The BoXeR 
motherboard should also suffice, as it is 
being earmarked for Toaster sales in the US. 

* A 1 15/120 volt, 60Hr power supply for 
the Amiga system. Most modern PC power 
supplies come with a little slider switch 
which toggles between European and 
American power standards. If your system 
does not have one, you will need to replace 
yours. 







i 




FEATURE 



neavy-duty ( 1 0OO watt or better is 
Eommendedf power converter, to power 
pour now-1 15V Amiga. To give you an idea 
*»at sort of expense you can expect. Mr 
- who used his Toaster while iiving in 
Germany, bought a 2000 watt model from a 
»i*fi shop for around C50. 

* Either of these items: an NTSC 1084 
mitor, or a device known as a Syne 

r. The Video Toaster relies on a cer- 
n signai to be provided through the RGB 
t of your Amiga in order to properly ini- 
That signal can be found on a 1084 
utor, or can be provided by the afore- 
ed Sync Strainer which is 3 special 
Je box that will set you back about £30. 
« Strainer was originally intended for 
nericans who did not use 1084 monitors 



may need multiple units - one (or more) for 
incoming video, one for outgoing video. 
Once again, the expense will largely be dic- 
tated by your willingness to pay and your 
concern for quality, MrSorenson recom- 
mends serious PAL Toaster users consider 
the Passport 4000, a high quality transcoder 
from Prime Image. Prime Image can be con- 
tacted on: + 1 408-867-6519- 

■ A Y/C Plus or similar board (optional). 
The Toaster's inputs and outputs are com- 
posite video, which is not nearly the best 
quality in the world. The Toaster can be 
upgraded to support superior S-Video with 
the Y/C Plus card. Because each additional 
component in a video chain degrades the 
signal, and transcoders are so important, 
that signal quality will get worse even faster. 
Using Y/C Plus and S-Video sources means 





*l j| Filial 



A Tuutif ml <» actii*. 



ter. become involved in a local film or video 
community - like many professional and ere- 









Put had multi syncs instead (which do not 
■ ; , ide the required signal) but they will 
erve just as well overseas, and will certainly 
f much cheaper to have shipped. A regular 

WL 1084 will not suffice, because the tim- 
2 signal would be wrong Of course, if you 
o with the NTSC 10B4. you will need to 

»wer it through the power converter as 

• A PAL/NTS C transcoding device 
HonaL but highly recommended}. This 
■ probably be the single greatest expense 
Wull have to make that a North American 
Bsn't. The transcoder will have to convert 
)f your incoming PAL signals {from video 
nieras, source tape, etc.) into NTSC, and 

back into PAL for recording. Depending 
what model you choose to invest in, you 



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there's more room to give in the video sig- 
nal, Unfortunately, this is an additional 
expense, and S-Video transcoders are simi- 
larly likely to be more expensive, but if quali- 
ty is the goal, this should be a serious 
consideration. 

Alternatively... 

You can still do some work to tape without 
any transcoders at all, or at least with one 
fewer. The alternative would be to purchase 
an NTSC VCR from overseas, plug it into the 
power converter, and use it as the record 
deck. That doesn't solve the problem of 
inputs - you can always use the compuler 
graphic outputs, of course, but any camera 
pr tape inputs still need to be converted to 
NTSC by a transcoder. But by recording to 
an NTSC VCR, you can 
use that for viewing on a 
suitable monitor, or per- 
haps even easier, play it 
on one of the growing 
number of consumer 
PAL VCRs which sup- 
port NTSC playback. 
Professionals tend to 
upgrade their video 
equipment at a fairly 
rapid rate. If you're really 
interested in the field 
but have a tight budget 
to work with, it would 
be worth your while to 
enquire of several video 
production firms or 
broadcast facilities how 
they dispose of their 
disused gear. Even bet- 




PAINT CG 



1 i 1 « CT¥' W! 8V1 



ative endeavors, one video person tends to 
know someone who knows even/one else, 
and by making a few contacts in key places 
you might be let in on an equipment fire-sale 
before anyone else. A good many Toaster 
studios have been built from castoM pieces 
of larger video firms. 

Getting into video is a serious investment 
no matter how you do it, Using a Toaster 
outside its native land does create some 
additional headaches and expense. There's 
no way around that. On the other hand, 
there's simply no substitute. You can buy 
standalone switchers and effects machines, 
or try to replicate some of the functionality 
of the Toaster with software like Sea la, 
Monument Designer, or X-DVE. 

All of these programs are very capable 
(and each does a few tasks better than the 
Toaster would), but none of them offers the 
unique combination of power at your finger- 
tips as the Video Toaster, Headaches and all, 
if you're a frustrated genius with a story 
you're just dying to tell on the small screen, 
investigating the Video Toaster would be a 
smart move • 
Jason Compton 



Contact NewTek 



To flnrJ Qtrt more contact NewTek on the numbers 
below Or visit their web site at www.newtek.com 
Tel: + f 2t0 370 8000 
(from US) 8M 862 7837 
Fax: +1 210 370 €002 
email: customer service@newtek.com 



31 




Magic 



You'll be amazed at 
what your Amiga can 
do when it comes to 
sound. It's true! There's 
virtually no computer- 
controlled audio 
process that's beyond 
your Amiga, and it 
needn't cost the Earth. 
Allow Tony Horgan and 
Dhomas Trenn to 
convince you... 








Think of Amiga audio and what 
springs to mind? An underpowered 
8-bit sound chip? A Techno 
Tragedy' case that lost out to the Atari ST 
because it didn't have MIDI ports built in? A 
nice idea but hopelessly out of touch and 
out of date? A joke compared to 'profes- 
sional' PC and Mac audio systems? If so. 
you need a serious update on the situation! 
Things have changed a lot in recent years, 
and 1996 has seen things progressing at a 
faster rate than ever before. See the panel 
for a selection of amazing audio feats that 
can be performed. 

Of course you can still do everything 
you could before, including a limitless array 
of slightly more obscure and specialised 
applications {sou rid effects for theatrical 
productions, on-me-fly sampling for DJs, 
standalone realtime effects processing, 
editing suite for outboard samplers, multi- 
media CD audio production...} 

Evert if you don't have a Zorro equipped 
Amiga yet, in the very near future 
you'll be able to do all of this 
from a bog standard AV2Q0! 
Add a fast SCSI controller, 
preferably via an accelera- 
tor, plus the forthcoming 
Melody 1200 sound 
card (which plugs into 
the clock connector on 
the motherboard} and 
you're away Better 
still, go for Zorro and 
the all the wonders of 
professional digital audio 
will be yours. 
Over the following pages 
you'll find a round-up 
of all the most exciting 
new audio developments alonside 
a few bits and pieces that have 
been, lurking in the shadows for a 
while. To get you up to speed, 
let's take a look at what's been 
happening over the last couple of 
years. 

Overcoming old 
limits 

Four mono (or two stereo) chan- 
nels of 8-bit audio can produce 
good results, but these days those 
specifications are laughably low. 



They are imposed by the Amiga's standard 
sound chip known as Paula. One way or 
another, the Amiga's inventive community 
of hardware and software developers have 
banished these limits to the pages of histo- 
ry. Thanks to some clever trickery, you can 
get 14-bit output from Paula with most 
audio software, while 16-bit audio is. avail- 
able via a range of sound card expansions 
The four channel limit is now obsolete 
due to a new approach to replaying audio. 
These days any decent bit of audio soft- 
ware either has direct support for sound 
cards or uses AH I (Audio Hardware 
Interface} which is a bit of software that 
redirects the program's sound to your cho- 
sen sound card. To take OctaMED 
SoundStudio as an example, 
instead of using Paula and the standard 
Amiga hardware Junctions for replaying 
sound samples, it does all of the sound 
processing itself, which includes the mixing 
of a theoretically unlimited number of 
tracks, and finally passes a single stereo 
audio stream to the sound card or the 
Amiga's internal Paul^ sound chip. 

Most Amiga sound cards are quite sim- 
ple. For example. Toccata does nothing 
more than play and record 16-bit stereo or 
mono audio at one of a number of rates up 
lo and above that of CD audio. Some have 
their own unique features, such as Delfina 
which can add echo and distortion effects 
while it plays and records. However, 
because the only thing they all have in 
common is the ability to record and play- 
back 16-bit audio, in order to use the addi- 
tional functions you need software written 
specifically for the card, which tends to be 



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quite scarce. An AHI driver is available for 
most sound cards, which is enough to 
mate them available as a 16-bit input and 
output for any software with AHI support. 

One of the most powerful upshots of 
this new method of replaying audio is that 
the final digital audio stream can be direct- 
ed to a hard drive as well as a sound card. 
That means you can record direct to a hand 
drive {or other media such as Jaz car- 
tridges), negating the need for a DAT or any 
other type of conventional recorder. You 
can then write an audio CD from the result- 
ing hard drive file. This kind of hard drive 
recording is available via AHI. OctaWED 
SoundStudio and a few other SoundStudio- 
lype trackers. 

Introducing CD-R 

Another of the- most 
exciting advances con- 
cerns CD-R: recordable 
CDs. Just a couple of 
years ago 
the 

thought 
of set- 
ting up a 
CD writ- 
ing system 
would have 
your wallet 
running for 
cover. The drives 
were expensive 
and so were the 

k discs. Not only 
that, but the software 
was at a 




required 

you to shell 
out for a major 



amount of 
SCSI hard 
drive capacity 
too. Things 
have changed 
in. a few 
ways: most 
obviously and 
predictably, 
the price of 
CD-R drives 
has fallen dra- 
matically, and 
so has the 
cost of the 
discs them- 
selves (now 
available for 
between £1 
and £2 depending on the size of your 
order). In addition, there's no need to have 
a second SCSI hard drive onto which to 
build your CD image before burning it to 
the actual CD. The software has advanced 
to allow CDs to be burned direct from the 
Original files. 

At the same time, hard drive recording 
and editing software has come on tremen- 
dously. Take a look at Samplitude and 
Sound Probe on this month's cover disks 
and CD and you'll be very pleasantly sur- 
prised. For example. Samplitude can now 
save out an entire CD's worth of audio as 
an AIFF file which includes embedded track 
markers, You could, for example, record a 
70 minute continuous DJ mix to hard drive 
with Samplitude, add track markers, save it 
and copy it direct to an audio CD, even fix- 
ing up your mistakes along the way. 

Multitasking 
master 

Never forget that 
your Amiga is an 
expert when it 
comes to smooth 
multitasking. For 
example, with a 
decent CPU 
(preferably an 
'060.1 you can 
comfortably have 
one program 
sequencing a 
bunch of MIDI 
devices while 
another pro- 
gram acts 
as a real- 
time 
effects 
proces- 
sor, 
adding 
all kinds 
of 



Try this for size 



Thanks to recent developments you can now 
do all of the following and more: 

* Compose, record and master a complete 
record to CD with no outboard mixers, effects 
units, keyboards or recorders at all 

* Digitally edit a completly seamless CD album 
and hum it in one go complete with track 



markers 






* Use you Amiga as a MIDI sequencer and 16- 
bit hard disk recorder or realtime effects 
unit at the same time 

* Emulate thousands of pounds worth of clas- 
sic discontinued analogue synths and drum 
machines 

* Pro-cess any sound with just about any 
audio special effect ever devised, including 
all the latest fads and favourites 

* Convert and use virtually every type of 
sound file in existence and copy sounds 
direct from normal audio CDs 




effects to any one or all of your external 
MIDI instruments. Alternatively you could 
set yourself up with a MIDI sequencer con- 
trolling your MIDI instruments, pass them 
all through a mixer and into a sound card, 
and have Samplitude record it all to hard 
drive in CD quality stereo. 

If you have a sound card, you actually 
have two independant audio outputs (the 
sound card and Paula), each of which can 
be controlled by different programs at the 
same time. The use of your internal Paula 
sound chip puts virtually no strain on the 
computer's CPU (so long as you don't use 
'mixing' techniques}, so using it in conjunc- 
tion with a sound card won't slow things 
down, Put your mind to it, experiment and 
you'll come up with schemes and ideas you 
never thought possible. 

Save money 

Your Amiga can a«so save you a lot of cash. 
For instance, classic analogue synths can 
fetch silly prices on the second hand mar- 
ket, and often won't integrate smoothly into 
your MIDI setup. With 'softsynths' like the 
forthcoming 303Tracker, you can have a vir- 
tual analogue Synth On your Amiga that out- 
pyts totally clean samples ready for you to 
use in your prefered sequencer or tracker, 

Basically, when it comes to audio, if 
there's something you've seen done on any 
other computer, it's almost certain you can 
do it with your Amiga, normally for a frac- 
tion of the cost and always in a far superior 
environment. 



FEATURE 



Samplers & 
Sequencers 

The core of your music making set-up is going to be either a sampler 
and a tracker or a MIDI sequencer. Here are some of the best... 



When it comes to making 
music from scratch 
you've got two choices. 
You can either use a sam- 
ple-based tracker-type 
program in conjunction with a sample edi- 
tor or take the MIDI sequencing route. Both 



OctaMED SoundStudio 



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OctaMED transcended the tracker genre from 
which it emerged many moons ago. Now it's 
out there in a league of its own, although it's 
been in a state o( hibernation for a couple of 
years now. It does have a few rivals snapping 
pt its heels, but still its direct support for most 
common Zorro sound cards and its multi-track 
mixing abilities make it the first choice for 
anyone who wants to stick with tracker-style 
editing but wants more power, flexibility and 
the chance to be rid of 8-bit samples. 
Unfortunately its disappointing sales have 
lead its original development team to move 
on to the PC, but in the true sprint of the 
Amiga, it has been picked up by a new devel- 
oper that is currently working on a version 2 
release This will include direct support for the 
Melody and Melody 1200 sound cards, which 
also happen to be developed by the same 
people. Version 1 is available for next to noth- 
ing on CD from Wierd Science and was includ- 
ed on the March 97 issue of CU Amiga 




have their advantages and limitations. With 
MIDI of course you'll need to splash out on 
50 me external MIDI sound modules and 
preferably a keyboard. This allows you to 
expand your system as far as your budget 
will take you but isn't the cheapest way of 
making music. We've not gone into detail on 
the subject of MIDI and outboard MIDI equip- 
ment as that's really a whole separate issue 
in itself and it would be impossible to cover 
even a small percentage of the avail- 
able MIDI instruments you could use. 
However, take a look at the MIDI 
sequencers panel for a list of what's 
available on the software front. 
Generally MjDI and Amiga sampling 
don't go together too well. This isn't 
for any particular technical reason 
(any Amiga can play samples and 
send MIDI information at the same 
time) but merely due to the focus of 
the developers. Tracker developers 
tend to disregard MIDI functions 
and MIDI sequencer developers 
' treat 8-bit Amiga samples with con- 
tempt. Most MIDI sequencers were devel- 
oped well before advances were made in 
16-bit Amiga audio, so there's nothing 
much going on with that combination 
either. There are exceptions to the rule 
however, such as OctaMED SoundStudio 
which incorporates MIDI sequencing seem- 
lessly into its sample tracking. 

Other trackers ol note include variants 
on the original SoundTracker. such as 
ProTracker. This is now looking very flaking 
and dated, limited to four channel B-bit out- 
put in most cases. These are remnants of 
the old school of Amiga audio - the day's 
we're trying to move away from now. More 
interesting is Syrnphonie. which takes the 
tracker idea but advances it in a similar 
manner to SoundStudio. It offers a window- 
based interface that desparate.lv needs 
\ some order, b-ul anything has to be better 
j than the system-hostile control panels of 
? the old ProTrackers. It also offers mixed out 



put featuring realtime effects processing, 

Sequencers 

MIDI sequencers haven't exactly come on 
in leaps and bounds in recent years, 
although that doesn't really matter all that 
much. At heart a MIDI sequencer is a very 
simple thing. It "listens" to the MIDI inter- 
face plugged into vow serial port and 



SoundFX 



SoundFX is probably the best share- 
ware digital audio processor for the 
Amiga. It includes over 50 effects 
(everything from echo to sunround 






m II i:i>ft* 




sound encoding). All functions have 
extensive parameter and modulation 
options and the capability to save/ load 
effetf configurations. 

An extensive ARexx command set 
gives you almost complete control over 
tnis application, with the ability to 
automate functions or even create cus- 
torn effects- Support is included for all 
common audio file formats and many 
unusual ones, too. Audio output is pos 
tibia through the Amiga's built-in audio 
hardware (with S and 14 bit implemen- 
tations) or using the AH1 system. 



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Studio 16 



Studio 16 was the first serious audio hard 
disk recording system to appear for the 
Amiga. It features a powerful timp line edi- 
tor which not only triggers audio samples 
but can also control external programs 
through ARexx, making it a full multimedia 
system. Its frame accurate timing and abil- 
ity to sync to SMPTE time code make it 
perfect for video/film projects, ft is capable 
of playing up to 8 tracks (AD516) or 4 
tracks (AD 101 2} at 44.1 kHz, with simulta- 
neous record and playback. The software 
has not been officially updated since 1944, 
However, due to the recent surfacing of 
some tong lost developer documentation, 
the program has been getting some new 
attention and the hope of some new 
enhanced modules in the future. Related: 
UMaster (tuelist file manager), 
StudiolGadd (developer documentation 
and add-on tools), Studio 16-Dev jv2.05 
developer mdOCumentation). SuperModel 
(GUI patch) and the Studio 16 support 
website (FAQ, email list, files), 




record notes, volumes and other perfor- 
mance data transmitted by your keyboard 
onto a timeline. You can then move this 
data around the timeline, add new tracks 
over the top, and then get the sequencer to 
send all the information back to your MIDI 
instruments. There, that wasn't difficult was 
it? There have been a few developments 
(see Dominator and Camouflage) but aside 
from that you're looking at software that 
stopped in its tracks some years ago. One 
of the less impressive examples that was 
doing the rounds a while ago has since 
reappeared lor free download via the web. 
Sequencer One is now available for Free by 
way of a promotion for Sequencer One 
Plus, If you've got web access you've got 
nothing to lose by taking a look, 

Bars & Pipes Pro 

Bars and Pipes Professional is the most 
powerful MIDI sequencer available tor the 



ProStation 



The soon to be released ProStation 
promises to usher in a new era for digi- 
tal audio processing on the Amiga 
Directed at high-end Amiga audio pro- 
fessionals, this digital recording/ pro- 
cessing system witl combine all the 
bast features of existing Amiga soft- 
ware [multi-track graphic time-line edit- 
mg, graphic mixing, high quality effects 
processing, ARexx, B&P synchroniza- 
tion, greater than CD quality) with that 
of more advanced Mac/PC audio appli- 
cations. This program is sure to create 
some excitement in the Amiga music 
community and we'll be first with the 
news, so watch here (or a full preview 
of this great new Amiga offering. 



Amiga. Its interface is a bit different, but 
once you get used to it, it presents many 
creative possibilities that are unavailable 
with similar programs. Although B&P Pro 
was abandoned during the Microsoft 
takeover, the availability of developer docu- 
mentation leaves it open for further expan- 
sion. With it now being Freely distributable 
it is an application that every Amiga musi- 
cian should have. Related: websites 
(Modern Plumbing and Richard Hagen's 
Bo Pi, an email List and the Triple Play Plus 
(48 channel MIDI interface). 

Music-X 

Before B&P Pro came along, Music-X was 
the best MIDI sequencer available, The 
addition of an ARexx module opened up 
lots of new possibilities for creative MIDI 
message processing. Music-X provides for 
additional MiDl channels 1 > 16) though cus- 
tom drivers; however, most of the support- 



ed hardware is difficult if not impossible to 
find. Related: Music-XJvlacros. 
MusicXMagic and MusicXRexxMacs. 

Camouflage 

Camouflage is a promising looking alterna- 
tive for MIDI sequencing, which seems to 
be on the right track. But, it appears that 
with no updates for over 2 years and 
unreachable web and email addresses, that 
this project may have been abandoned. 

Dominator 

The author of Dominator, Luc De pauw. has 
moved on from the Amiga, but will be 
releasing one final update that adds AHI 
Support and event editing. It will appear on 
his website in early July, and will also 
include a free key-file, He is looking for 
someone to take over the development, so 
if you are interested get in touch with him. 





email: craftbro@midicraft.demon.co.uk. 


Where to get them 


■ aminet: mus/midi/Music-X Macros. lha 


Bars & Pipes Professional - Blue Ribbon 


ProStation - AudioLabs - $ TBA 


SoundwOrks - 5 Free http: 


http: wvifw.audiolabs.it 


members.theglobe.com/geoarn/ 


email: info@audiolabs.it 


http: www.in2net com/bws/hluc- 


SoundFX - Stefan Kost - £20 US$30 


Bars & Pipes Professional Support Site 


http: www.imn.htwk- 


http: www.execulink.com/— jtech/b&p/ 


leip7ig.de/-k0st/S0undFX html 


Camouflage- I.S.M. - DM 139 


email: kost@imn.htwk-leipzig.de 


a m i net ; m u s/midi/ca mouf lage 1 49E . 1 ha 


Studio 16- SunRize Industries -S Discontinued 


Dominator - Luc De pauw - $ Freeware 


StudiolGadd - Kenneth Nilsen - S FreeWare 


http: www.ping.be/raversgarden/ 


email: kenny@bgnett.no 


email: Luc.DePeuw@ping.be 


aminet: dev/misc/Studio16add.lha 


aminet: mus/midi/dominatorVI 51 .lha 


SoundStudiO - Weird Science 


Music-X - Hollyware/Microlllusions - $ 


Tel: 0116 246 3800 


Discontinued 


Sequencer One 


Music-X Macros - Gareth R. Craft - S Freeware 


Software Technology Ltd 


http:www.midicraft.demon.co.uk/-craftbro 


http: /./www. s of t ware-tec hnology.com 



4 



FEATURE 




Tbds&Other 

Bits 



You won't get by with just one major music 
application. Sometimes you just have to 
reach into your tool bag... 



No one piece of software is 
going to do all the jobs you 
always want it to, Sometimes 
you might find you've got an 
alien file format that won't 
load directly into your prefered workstation 
application. Whatever it is you do, it's likely 
that at least at one time or another you'll be 
glad you got some of this stuff at your dis- 
posal. 

Sound file convenors 

Ami SOX is the "Swiss Army Knife" of sound 
file conversion. It supports most of the 
common formats as well as some more 
unusual ones, If you have a sound file to 
convert this i 5 Ihe first program to look at 
It can also perform some simple digital pro- 
cessing functions. 

IF you want to convert audio files for 
writing to CD or for use on the Flyer, Audio 
Thunder is the answer. In addition to con- 
version, it also provides basic cut/ paste/ 
effect and auditioning functions. A time 
sequencing editor, for merging multiple 
audio dips into a single clip, is also 
included. 

MPEG audio is becoming a very popular 
music format because of its high compres- 
sion; though unfortunately, it is mostly 
being used for music piracy. The encoding 
process can take a long time, so a fast 
machine is recommended. However, either 
mp3enc or the newer 8hz-mp3 should do 
the job nicely regardless of your system 
speed. No known Amiga applications will 
load RealAudio sound files, but most can 
load something in raw format. The tool to 
make this conversion is RA, 

Sample players 

At the top of the list is Play16. providing 
support for most popular sound formats up 
to 16 bit al 56 kHz in stereo. It supports 
playback through the Amiga's built-in hard- 
ware (Paula). AHI and the MaestroPro and 
Prelude sound cards. For low memory con- 
ditions or large sound files, PlaylGcan even 
perform real-time play from hard disk. It 
also works well in conjunction with RA to 
play RealAudio files. 

If you want to play the popular MPEG-3 
song files that proliferate the internet, 
Amiga AMP (.formerly MPEG AH I) is the pro- 
gram to use. If you do not like the Amiga 



gadgets, it will load WinAMP compatible 
"skins" for a nice, but slow loading, 256 
color interface. AmigaAMP is capable of 
doing real-time decoding on an 060 at 50 
MHz or at half the sampling rate on an 040 
at 40 MHz. PPC users will enjoy additional 
functions. 

i HO SVJten CXplore' 




The problem with MIDI song files is that 
the only people who can listen to them is 
other MIDI musicians. Even those people 
will not hear the song properly if they do 
not own similar sound modules. GfvlPlay is 
a virtual GM module that substitutes MIDI 
channel notes for hard disk sample trigger- 
ing, The distribution includes many GM 
standard sounds, but if they are not to your 
liking, there are several alternative archives 
available. You can also use your own cus- 
tom sounds, so non-GM compositions can 
also be played or arranged. 

MIDI Tools 

With many MIDI setups, it becomes more 
and more difficult to organiie the ever- 
growing accumulation of MIDI data files, 
One possible solution is a MIDI librarian like 
Patchmeister. Designed to be used as a 
stand-alone program or a B&P Pro add-on, it 
covers many of the basic needs of a librari- 
an, However, with no available documenta- 
tion and some dead-end limitations it is not 
the final solution. But, being one of the 
Blue Ribbon freebies, it is worth having a 

look. 

Another option is an upcoming program 
called MSE-Snapshot. With it, you simply 
define a project (song) and assign MIDI 



devices to it. Then, with a click of a button, 
MSE-Snapshot will retrieve all MIDI data 
from the associated devices, To recreate tti 
song setup, select an existing project and 
let the program do all the work for you, 
With so many different user inter- 
faces on musical devices it can 
become very confusing to edit 
sounds. What would help is a con 
men interface for all devices- The 
solution is the "Universal Paten 
Editor" (UPE); a greet idea, but 1 
reality is that with so many differed 
and changing MIDI implementations 
the UPE is a myth. 
.re A more realistic solution is MIDI 
-j SYStem EXplorer (MSE). It does not 
claim to be a UPE, but does strive to 
solve many of the problems- It 
comes with everything you neec 
create your own fully customized 
MIDI control systems. To create 
device specific modules, MSE used 
special definition language that even non- 
programmers should find easy to use. Wii 
it, you can customize almost everything, 
including: screens, windows, fonts, colors 
graphics and gadgets. MSE can control al 
kinds of MIDI data, so it can be used for 
almost any MIDI control applications, inctt 
ing: patch editing, mixing, lighting and 
laser displays. 



CD-R software 




There are a number of capable CD writing 
packages available these days Take a look ir 
on this month's cover CD for a very capable 
version of MakeCD. MasterlSO and Bum It ar 
also names to look out for. 






FEATURE 






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Updating your audio hardware is now a 
realistic and practical option thanks to 
widespread software support for the growing 
range of sound cards. 




Whether through AHI or 
direct software support, 
there are now many ways 
you can make use of a 
sound card expansion 
your favourite audio software. The days 
>f sound cards being tied to their own 
ittware are gone, leaving you free Lo 
■ d match pretty much as you see 
t Here's a round-up of the major 
_ ;n Tenders, 

Tocatta 

It you can find one, a Toccata 
card will give you a good qual 

■:■ hit input and output 
that's well served by AHI, 
Samplitude and OctaMED 
SoundSludio. Availability 
;e cards seems to 
lave dried up recently 
so your best bet is 
probably to keep an 
eye on second 

j ads. It was 
originally on sale 
for £299 which was a 
5t of money to ask for a 
basic 16-bit DA-AD card, but if 
fou can get a good price you'll not 
have any complaints. 

Maestro Pro 

ihe Maestro Pro is a fully digital audio card. 
* ndudes one digital input (selectable; opti- 
cal or coaxial) and one digital output (opti- 
cal. Do not let the coaxial input fool you, 
although it is an RCA connector it will not 
*ork with analog device outputs (synth, cas- 

iette player, etc.). It is capable of operating 
it 48 kHz {internal sync ) and at 32/44 J kHz 
♦external sync) 

Why would you want one? One of the 
problems with sampler cards is that they 
ire subjected to all kinds of computer inter- 
■mnce, which can add noise to your 

wordings, A better alternative is to use an 
external digital recorder (such as DAT) to 
••cord analog signals and then transfer 
them digitally to the Amiga using this card, 

> vou could directly transfer sounds/songs 

"om a CD/laserdisc pSayer or other device 
tat has a digital output without any loss of 



quality. It can also be used to remove SCMS 
copy protection from DAT recordings. As an 
audio output card (AHI) it is capable of bet- 
ter than CD quality output. 



Melody 




There are a few variants of the Melody 
sound card due for release later this 
year The most interesting is the 
A1 200 version which 
attached to the clock 
connector on the 
motherboard (didn't 
know you had one of 
those did you?}. Details 
are sketchy at the 
moment but it could be 
the one worthwhile alter- 
native to converting your 
A 1200 into a Zorro tower. 

AD1012/AD516 

The AD5I6 is an analog 
sound card/sampler with duat 
16 bit A/D converters, 64 times 
oversampting and preset anti- 
aliasing filters. It is capable of 
recording and playing back in 
stereo at rates up to 48 kHz. 
Its predecessor, the AD1012, 
has a single 12 bit linear A/D 
converter and is capable of 
record/playback in mono at rates up to 48 
kHz, Unlike the AD516, its anti-alias filters 



MIDI interfaces 



There are dozens of MIDI interfaces available 
for the Amiga- They can be easily found, new 
and used, In most cases, they provide' one 
MIDI IN, one THRU and one OUT. It is impor- 
tant to note that most devices that have 
additional OUT connectors do not allow for 
mare MIDI channels. One exception is the 
Triple Play Plus, which was designed specifi- 
cally for BfrP Pro. This device provides three 
independent OUTs, allowing an additional 48 
channels of MIDI transmission. 

Most interfaces connect to the serial port 
and are compatible with the majority of MIDI 
applications without a custom driver. 



\ 



Most oi the other options for non-Zorro 
Amigas are limited in various ways but 
recent software developments have made 
them more practical. For example. Aura and 
Clarity 16 both offer A 1200 and all other 
Amiga users respectively the chance to get 
into 16-bit sampling - Aura is actually 12-bit 
Sound Probe has drivers to support both of 



these. 



w 



are variable (which can be used for some 
often interesting effects). Both cards are 
equipped with an LTC SMPTE time code 
reader and an ADSP2105 sound coproces- 
sor rated at 10 MIPS. The AD51G was 
rumoured to have a digital audio add-on, but 
this never made it past the prototype stage. 
An AHI driver does not exist for either of 
these cards at this time. 

Delfina DSP 

The Delfina DSP sound card is interesting 
for ltd extra digital signal processing abilities 
granted by the DSP chip that forms its 
brain. Unlike most other cards which simple 
input and ouiput 16-bit sound. Delfina can 
add reverbs and other effects the audio 
stream along the way. The card comes with 
its own effects control software which dou- 
bles up as a sampler although sadly third 
party support for its DSP features has so far 
not materialised. 



Where to get them 

AD in 12 AD516 - S unitize Industries - $ 

Discontinued 

Amiga AMP * Thomas Wenzel - $ 
FreeWare 

http : amigaamp amiga-5oftware.com/ 
email: wenzel@uniKserv.rz.fh-han- 
nover.de 
aminet: mus/play/AmigaAMPIha 

AmiSox - David Champion - £ 

FreeWare 

email: dgc3@midway.uchicago.edu 

aminet: mus/edit/AmiSOJC33.lha 

Triple Play Plus (clone) ■ OCTAVE 2 

media - US$166 

http: 

www.octave2.ch/amiga.' amiga_e.htm 
email: info@octave2,th 
tel; 41-32 325 33 71 



FEATURE 



SoftSynthsQ 
Stiff 



Why add synths outside your Amiga when 
you can have a load of them gurgling away 
on the inside? 



Wave Beast 

WaveBeast emulates a two oscillator ana- 
log synthesizer, including: multiple wave- 
form selection, filters, envelopes, 
modulation, and basic effects. It can be 
programmed using its 64 step sequencer, 
which provides control of tempo, transposi- 
tion, slide and portamento. Sound genera- 




tion requires an intensive calculation 
process, 50 the more CPU power it has the 
better. The length of created sounds is 
dependent on the amount of memory 
available. 

FMsynth 

FMsynth emulates a sis operator frequency 
modulation synthesizer (such as the 
Yamgha DX7), It includes parameters for 
pitch and amplitude envelopes, modulation, 
key scaling, phase, level, detune, feedback, 
transposition and more. Sounds are created 
in 8 bit and saved as 8SVX format. The cal- 






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culation process is very fast. Almost 300 
patches are included as examples. 

303Tracker 

Son of 303Emu, 303Tracker aims to bring 
us the incredibly realistic TB303 emulation 
of its forerunner in a new improved, easy to 
use format. The rather hacky initial incarna- 
tion allowed 
you to gen- 
erate sam- 
ples that 
were exact- 
ly like ihe 
sound of 
the 303 acid 
box, but if 
you wanted 
to make 
sequences 
you had to 
use an awkward scripting system. 
3Q3Tracker will offer a familiar tracker-style 
front end allowing notes, filter settings and 
slides to be programmed with ease, then 
rendered as 8 or 1 6-bit samples. 
Synchronisation with OctaMED 
SoundStudio is also promised. We'll let 
you know as soon as it's ready! 



Speech 

The Amiga's built-in speech system (narra- 
tor.devicertranslator. library) is quite power- 
ful, Though, using the Say command, you " 
would never know it. SpeechToy adds four- 
teen more variable parameters to that of, 
&ay, giving control of everything 
from articulation to enthusiasm of 
the computer speech. It also adds 
direct phonetics entry and transla- 
tion, There is also a replacement 
translator, library which adds the 
capability of multi-lingual speech. 
It includes a system of pronuncia- 
tion rules, called accents which 
extend the speech beyond the 
American English bias of the origi- 
nal. Many accent files are avail- 
able, including: Polish, Italian and 
even Klingon. This new translator 
is backward compatible with the 
old and also faster at phonetic 
translation. 
Wish you could capture the 



AHI 



With so many different sound cards avail- 
able, the Amiga needed some kind of stan- 
dard to access them consistently So, Martin 
Blom created the Audio Hardware Interface 
(AHI) AHI makes it easy for audio applica- 
tion developers to add support for most 
sound hardware without having to create 
custom drivers for each. 
It allows programs to share audio resources 
so that several programs can process sound 
simultaneously. AHI drivers already exist for 
the Amiga's internal audio hardware, as 
well as most popular sound cards, Most 
major audio applications, and many games, 
include support for AHI. 



Amiga speech as a sound file? There is a 
rare and little known utility, called Say To 
Raw, that will let you do just that, It re-route^ 
output from the Say command to a raw 
audio file, allowing you to use speech in 
whatever situation you choose. ■ 



- m Swueftflg- ■■. :<-. _ 



<J.*F*ltJl I TWE LI. ' IB EHUPOr- ftHJH AKIKT ' NTT[«« 

■ 09 $H 



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IAEK 

ILL 



Availability 

AHI Man in Btom ■ $ FreeWare/Donation 
http: wvwv.lysatorliu se'-lcs/ahi.html 

email: Ic5@lysa10r.liu.se 
g.minat: rnus/rNsc^riiusr.lria 

FMsynth - Christian Stiens - USS20 
aminel: mu&/misc/fnr»5ynth37.lha 

Say To Raw Ften£ Eberhard - S Freeware 
http: www.icbl.hw.ac.yk/-cj3/am1ga.html 

SpeechToy - Chris Demiris - S Freeware 
amine!: utiifwbispeecrttoy2.lha 

WaveBeast - Marco Thrusti/Jan Krutisch 

S Freeware 

http: www.rzbd.fti- 

hamburg.de/~s14690u^smigafi*avebeast.ritrni 

email: Jan.Krutisch^rzbd.fti-harnburg 6<i 



EYELINE 



- Bringing you the latest Amiga News from Eyeteeh 




'sources 
ss sound 
exist for 
i, as 
/lost 
games, 



ere is a 

Say To 
It re-routes 
a raw 
»ech in 



EZPC spec boosted 

(0-bit A4 flatbed scanner & 64MB 
now included as standard 
The EZPC is now the cheapest way to get a 
highly spec'd Amiga 1200 - over 40% 
cheaper than a Zorro3 solution - and you 
get a free PC thrawn in! 

b has enhanced the specification of the EZPC-Tower 

ersion for the AI20Q giving purchasers the use ofpcriph- 

iOW accepted as standard accessories by PC users, but 

berto very expensive - if available at all - m their dedicated 

orm, 

ctechs new EZPC-Tower configuration now includes: 

1 Z rower-Plus with k/b. k/b adapter & 250W PSU 
Jfrbit, single-pass A4 flatbed scanner & OCR s/w 

2 additional high speed serial and one bidirectional 
printer port 

32-speed CDROM (with the option to upgrade lo a 
CDReaderAVriier tor jusi £199.95 > 
24-bit frame grabber i composite or SVHS source), in- 
cluding motion video & sound recording, 
3,2GB of additional hard disk space. 
16-bit, 32 v dice w nvetabfc sound card with midi interface 
an J direct-to-disk recording software 
Amiga-accessible high density floppy drive 
High resolution graphics card with fall screen MPEG 
playback. 

Al 200 and PC ethemel connectivity for use in a network 
environment, if appropriate. 

2 x buffered IDE. channels supporting 4 device* m luml 
and ... 64MB of memory tx the PC side 



■B 



J U, 



EZPC-Tpwer 
Hardware item 


Nearest Amiga 
equivalent 


Amiga 
price 


7-Tawer-Pius 
\4 flatbed scanner 


Tower syxtCOl + i/I> 

fiytlechk MAXpkg 


aao 

£IM 


9 if rial + / jr parallel 
2- f peed CDROM 


PvrtPlus 7.1 

32xmtc h +■ ELIDE 


£70 
£60 


Mjpan\itm $lol& 

Ugh rex graphitx card 


Micronik ~£.J+video 
Picasso IV 


£360 
£250 


'ill milium frame grabber 
"I tuner w/ teletext 


Protirab PCMCIA 
Paloma IV 


1136 
£100 


MS xtrund card 
211R hard drive 


Prelude 
33GB TawerDrivt 


£170 
£140 


fgh density floppy 
J^deriee buffered IDE Uf 


Micronik 
EZCD-Mk4 


£55 

£40 


Vturttet networking 
tPEUfall screen pfback 


Eyeteeh PCMCIA 

tv'a 


m 


UPC-Tower - £999.95 


Amiga equivalent - 


£1795 



ugh it is impossible lo give a lOtKf Like-for-like com- 
largely due to lack of choice of equivalent Amiga 
the table above shows thai implementing the nearest 
lent functionality to the EZPC system using the Zorro3 
lion runic costs nearly SCHf more. And of course you 
i gain a fully Functional, high performance PC system to 
in less serious computing activities - sucrj as taoiei 

devices are available to the Amiga - either directly 
. Siamese RTG2.5 system - or via direct access of their 
led dala files by Amiga programs. 

as ■ofT-thr-shi'lf' TV PC systems w r run silsti build 

I tii order if vim require special functionality - such 
linear editing of video tapes. Just ring and ask! 



EZVGA PC monitor adapters now available in 
6 models to suit all Amigas & pockets 

Internal AA chipset and external universal models available with or without flickerfixer* 
Why so many models? How do you choose which one 1 is best for you? 



Choke 1: Internal or External? 

II' you have ;m Amiga Willi :ni AA fAt.l Vl i liipsel then you have lite uplinn In List :.u inlemal 
EZVGA adapter. This is an adapter board that plugs over one of the Amiga chips and joins lo a 
second board which is plugged into the 23-pin video port. The main benefit of this adapter is that 
it takes the digital signals direel from the "Lisa" chip {rather than by using the analogue output from 
the extern u I 23 pin connector;. I'lus makes the design less complex electronically and results hi 
a lower cost for the finished product. On the other hand fitting (any J internal unit does require a 
level of manual dexterity and electrical common sense which is not required by me 'plug and play' 
design of externa] units. Von should also note thai the fitting of an internal nail requires the meial 
shield of the A 1200 to he completely removed, itself a far from trivial ope rat io n unless you nave 
a 'towering up' operation. If you have an Amiga other than an A 1 2W or A+Q00 then you should 






already dune so as pan of 
use an external model, 



V 



\ 



Choke 2: Satndoubler #r flickerfixer? 

A scandoublcr simply allows normal PAL (or NTSQ non-interlaced 15KH^ (TV display ablci 
sereenmodes lo be displayed on a standard PC monitor. If you use software chat puts the display into 
these modes automatically - as mosl games do - then a scandoublcr is probably ah you need. (This 
is also all you need if you are using a retargetable graphics system - such as an Amiga graphics card 
or the Siamese system - for most of your Amiga work, but need to be able to display native 1 SKI 1/ 
screen modes occasionally on a PC oonrpatibk: screen). A flickerfixer on the other hand allows you 
to display interlaced 1 5 KHz screens - which are normally unusable on a 1 5KHz moniiororTV. This 
gives you twice the vertical resolution and a rock- steady picture for serious applications as well as games. The EZVGA-Mk2 
scandoublcr can be upgraded lo the EZVGA-Plus flickerfixer by adding extra memory chips. 

Choice i; EZVGA- $E or EZVGA-Mk2 ? 

The 'heart' of any Amiga computer - the thing lhat 
makes it tick ■ is a 28MHj: oscillator. This is used to 
gov ern all aspects of the Amigas operation - including 
its video output. (In fact the PAL and NTSC versions 
nf the Amiga require slightly different oscillator fre- 
quencies (o meet the correct TV standards). I owei 
cost external VGA adapters - like the EZVGA-SE and 
mosl competitive products ■ use their own oscillator to 
'replace' that in ihe Amiga By using the Amigas genlock 
circuitry. As well as precluding the use of a genlock 
itself this method can introduce some incompatibilities 
with some timing-critical expansion units sucfe ai 
accelerators, It also needs to be manufactured with 
difl'erenl oscillators for NTSC and PAL Amigas so is 

not universally interchangeable. The EZVGA-Mk2 and EZVGA-Pluson the other hand QSe some advanced electronics to 
derive an oscillator signal from ihc Amigas video output This means thai both these unils w, ill work with all Amigas and will 
not interfere with ihc operation of any other peripherals. 

CDPIus-SE comes out tops in latest review 

"Eyeteeh have come up with a real winner with this new CDROM drive" - Ben Vost 7 AF 

Eyeteeh 'satl-new CDPtus-SE has come out top in a comparative review in the July I99ft issue 
ufAotigo Format, winning a 949 riiiing and an Amiga Format tit>td Award. 
The unit in available with either 20- or 32- speed, whisper-quiet CDROM mechanisms and 
comes complete wiih ihe Eyelcch EZCD-SE J -device buffered interface, cables and CDROM 
software written specially for Eyelcch by ihe author of IDEfix. As with all Eyclcch-dc^igrsed 
products, the CDPIus-SE comes with ^lep-hy-step captioned pictorial instructions, including 
detailed instructions for fitting the EZCD interface with different internal hard drive configurations. 

The CDPIus-SE is also available wiih an optional audio mixer module for jus 
tl'J.'JS extra. This module Ills inside the CDPlas-SE case and mixes ihe ettdk 
output from the Amiga with lhat from the CDROM mechanism at the correct lev els. 
The composite audio is available on gold-plated phono sockets on the hack pane 
of the CDPhts-SE ease. 

In addition the same mechanism, cables, interface and software are also available 
as special bundles with the Eyeteeh MiniTower. Desktop and full EZ-Tower cases 





EZVGA 
Internal 


EZVGA ezvGa 

External Mk2/PI us 


Pass-through vf>I6KIIz modes 


Its 


Yes 


Yen 


Europe/US Amiga compatible 


Yes 


Europe 


Yes. 


Upgradable to flickerfixer 


Vrt 


So 


Yes 


'1'tug & Play ' installation 


\„ 


Yes 


Y'es 


f.W.t Amiga oscillator 
(for compatibility) 


)CV 


,\'o 


Yes 


ScandiWttter ■ rode: ADFT-VGV 
■ price; 


-INT 
£59.95 


-SIRE 

£59.95 


-fiMLi 
£74.95 


Flickerfixer - code : ADPT-VGA- 
- prici:: 


-IFF 

£89.95 


-SIISKF 

£99, 95 


■stwv 
£119.95 




CDPIus-SE 20-speed 


£99. 95 


CDPIus-SE 32-speed 


£119.95 


CDPIus-SE audio mixer 


£19.95 


CD/'lus Mi mi u/grade 


+£2tl 


CDPtits-SE Foil 
EZ-rTower upgrade 


+£90 



html 



Do you like ihc soand of the EZPC -Tower System - but would like to try out the Siamese RTG system first? Well for jus) 

fly functional £24.95 you can now experience the full functionality of the Siamese software - supplied on CDROM - for yourself. 

1SSB 2. 1 f Windows 95 PC and null modem cable required). What's more you can irade in the software against the full 2.5 (ethemet) 

3 Software vz rsion of the Siamese software w ilh fu 1 1 credit ( less carriage ) wi th in 30 days of purchase, The offer also applies i f you wish 

t*r\j nr tth upjr^'k' i" the Siamese ethernet pack or a full EZPC-Tower system - sec the prices on the rielu. 

tSt £24.95 Th^. Siamese RTG2, 1 software allows you to copy files back and form between PC and Amiga as well as retargeting Amiga 

screens on the PCs monitor. V2. 1 is a bit too slow for graphics - that needs the 100* speed-upof the RTG 2.5 ethemel system, 



Siamese RTG 2,1 s/w 



Siamese RTG 2.5 x/w 



RTG 2.5 & PC/Am ethernet £1*9.9$ 



..'m null modem eiih (far .*, t _> 



Trade-in value of Siamese 
2. 1 v/h.- witkin -W da\x 



£24.95 



£99 95 



£9.95 



£24.95 







«-*! 


' '4^\sw 


£ « 




3-5: 









Fuji DS-7 Digital < ameru with maim adapter /nic oil rechargee 

MoT«« , 2<W p.koI mot** - M lor wab OW"" ■ ^™^^l£l!*Sii card 

BUM uD W 30*0 rwlalD* «• *Wi»« in Jpeg taimal an eKrhangaab* SMB. STnairMady. card 

5*n lunar artowfc* batanc*. ipwluie-pnorny aaH>eiipo«irt *rm manual Ev adjustment. 
Eqiwsrent w 3Bnirn lennlEO 1 M saniflr.it* In 35mm eaiwa taimft 

taif /etc of jus* •£**, 5>5 w/ffrdMf adt&at & CamCvntrol s/w 



Plu&Scep* *ejhw* -jwti a W-« «UW «oc*j fcuf-' 

WOk 300 dpi optical raiioiutun. *»glB-i»M- »"■ ** 1"""»* «»™ r 
Comas with P^otosrapa (*™ij*i ana Mac salt*.™. Company *■> ell morlwri 
SCSI niertssas - prckrfng Classic 5w»"H (Dm no1&i*Squlrr*J. 
PCWSastScadiw rfieSB' Awaro- JuhrlWS 

PnraJld pon banian Uf E|PC-T™*r jl» aWutsIX* *\ lo™ cost - imfl IW (MUK 
Amj'ga M1MX Bcaantt * PnotOSeape bundle 




The Eyetech EZ-Tower System - from just £79.95 



Thinking of towering up your A 1200'.' Then you 

should certainly be considering ihe unique Eyewcti 

EZ-Tower system; 

V The easiest way to re-house your A 1200 by far 

v Expand yew system with EZPC oi Zorm slots (see pi t 

250 W PSU *ith PC" Bid Amig» power connectors, 
\ Available in 4 models <o suit different ski IK and budgets 

The nnk tower allowing boili PC &. AUOO in one cw», 

DIV 



'TO* definitely one of the 
easiest solutions ta build- 
ing your own tower. " 
Amiga Format 
"The Fyetech tower offers 
clever solutions with a 
Vetera easyfit mentality" 
Cu Amiga 



DF0: face plate, cable 

Custom backpauel wfS(Sl,a«dio KO's 

A12WI power and LEO adapters 



CE-approvcd metal Ft ' cast' 
No ofbays/PSC capacity 
Accessible PCMCIA slut 



Backplate 
Kit 



Full 
EZ-To weri EZ-Tower 



DIY assembly instructions 

Installation instructions 

PC hoard/Siamese cintiBatibilitjL 



Assembled & Alim-ready 
EZ-Key adapter & Wim93 kfb 
Eyetech installation option _ 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
n/a 
nfa 
Yes 
~¥es" 
Yes 
Yes 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

TeT 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



L 



Cost with options as specified 



\o 

Option 

No 



tfflSBW 

Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



So 

Option 

No 



£39.95 

■ WiimiM HIT ^■Jniii'ryimli-n:l"MUi»r r .lM b 1 ^ ■""■-•' f'-^l-^IK ■""' 



\ £79,95 



" Yes" 

I6/25QW 

Yes 



EZ-Tower 
Plus 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 

Option 

Yes 



ies 

Yes 

Yes 

~YeT 



ll)/25fW 
Yet 



n/a 
Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



iW35 



£14&9$ 

'iiTVI in [■I-I--I?' _ 




Join the Digital lmagin« 
Revolution with Eyetecl 

Amiga digital imaging software from Artdeas GuntheA 
"An excellent piece of software ' ' (.iold Award - Amiga Form 

ScanCluisi & PholoScup* Software 

H bit scanning wilh full range Of editing options 
. 'Scan-to-disk' option in J|»g or IFF .„=«, 

Stand-alone yse or integrates «'h your Ar1 pHckag* (AdPro. «&>•« 

RPaint PtMStogenics. ImageFX. XiPaint, Pagestraam 3. DPaintS) via A 
. SQ3 - lor Epson, HP SCSI & Epsor parallel scanners PhotoScope rM 

UMAX 610S. & 1 2tQS scanno« 

CamCantrol AmJg* Digital Carticra SoHware - km* 

Serial connsction vftraons availabte 1or most popular medals or Kodak 
Minolta Olympus. Casio 4 Fuji digital cameras. 
Picture transfer, camara control A slifteShow options CMWB *P«I 
StajXJ-alona use or integrals with your Art package lAdPro, Art trad 
t>Pair-1 Phnfogenici. ImagaFX. XiPaim. Pageslream 3. DPaml&l ^laft 
Sele^abte Sfrftai davirt h» use with high-speed irHeclaces like the ^ 



rktAllOBUl-Tetrrr 



TurboPrint 6 ■ the essential partner for yt 
digital imaging work - £38.95 

The most eompeehansive-. fastast renlacartlafvl 
printing system 1o» all WB2.:«+ Amtgas 
Supports Ih8 latest Epson, Canon. HP pnnters - 
including the AwarOVwinning Epson Stylus Photo 
. Integrates seemlaaaly with ScanOui^PhotoSMpe- 
scanning software and Can*C?mtrol digleam s.m 
Poster priming, imaga lltlmg. colour oomeclion, print 
spooling, photo optimisation «tc etc aH as standaid 
SelscWhle parallel device for use win high-sp**d 
interfaces such a* the F crtFlui jsee, below). 



«NHthll NN l» 



EZ-Key 



^HlKmiBi,1fl Einn rBmapS Amiga amd PC myboarlJs 
Choiee ci two k«iAo«iii'5Hi«£iaWs PC krr mappng: 

"The nicest keyboard adapter we've came across..." Cu Amiga 



EZ-Kev alone 



just 



EZ-Key and Win95 k/b bundle 
EZ-Key and A4000 k/b bundle 



£39.95 
£49.95 
£69.95 



PariPlw. - 2 1 460KM seriai + / Jr SOOKS/s parallel 

£ Fartjnr - I X 4M>Kb(l Serial ports for the A120S 

PortPlu* - £79.^5 - arfatt £70 HbtruQtit with TurttoPrlnt 6 

PorUnr - C39 95 - or ju*t E30 tt bought -with CfmCotttrOl 

BcUl llH r'iiill'lus 1 hull .ruLhiu Ihr pi«'"' 



^il A I aju tli' 




Amiga 1200 Magic Packs 

- Direct to Eyetech from Amiga International Inc. 

Full UK speeltication wrrji KicksLart %.\l 

Worktjerich 3.1 disks and manuals.. UK psu 

mouse, moueomal and TV lead and 2MB 

graphics memory l.m addMlon to any memory 

expansion includadl in the pack* t»lnw). 

Fantastic sofhwuB bundle indudino 

War*wortmSE.Turti(Kate3.5 DalaStere 1.1, 

Ptictogenics 1.25E. Personal Pamt6.4. 

Oraaniser l.t. Pinball Mama ant) Whizz 

Hard drive versions come wrlh Scala MM3O0 preirvstalled 

btne, ^tiona 4 EZ-TD*e f Msgic Puck hundlss from £34*95- nngtordalaHs 




Eyetech Starter Pack & Starter Pack Plus 

Diskette based system as above - Juii£ W.M 

1 70MB HD-based system as above - Jus' "** *- 

Add an -oatlfi 3EC acceptor with SUB torjust i i '-' 5 '•" " ■ * lime ofpu,*"* en^ 

Eyetech Productivity Pack 3 

1 70MB HD. '030/33MHzMtMU/FPU/8MB • Just £$2B.9i 

Upgrade to anM^5UH^HUOrTPU^T«¥a AND tn u^t^PSUt^Jymt£^_ 



^mM 



Eyetech MimTower Pack 3 

1.7GB HD, '040/25MHZ/MMU/FPU/16MB, 20-speed 
CDROM EZCD~Mk4 4-device buffered i/f & cables, 
EZIDE sAv, MiniTower case with 2$0W PSU ■ Just 

Upgrade lean' ; M AHzmtUrTPU w/3 StttB for fMt£69. 95' 

Eyetech Professional Pack 3 

4.3GB HD, '040/33MHZMIMU/FPU/32MB, 24-speed 

CDROM EZCD-Mk4 4-device buffered iff & cables, 

EZtDE sAv EZTower-Pius case with 250W PSU - Just £798.9$ 

Upgrade to a 1 6LWN* PfC « ■G4*?5tl*Hz>M WFPU w/64MB for jut 1 r t JftjS^J 

UteiMW Pl.t tl-SE economy 4-derkt 
bmfftred interface /mm Eyttsch -Art Q4SS 

■- SiiUOl»lnri™sirBB<»imparfO'm9ncBA^amtiy«lBins. 

Wines wrrn E¥«liKh AT API l/w hy *e ai*w 0< IDEJiif 
. Trade IP tn EZCD-Mrt Id al M hnying price (»== 

eimagt) rt#im 30 days M KWLwedl 

£2CD-se CDffOW *w wji/i 3K-M »"y wt-* '■»"» **i*»y «n«" l J«.»a 
EZUD-nVJ vJIfl *uif £I-nPe-«*r «rf W- • 44-w*ye«ar«i 



New/ Amiga SVGA Monitors 

. for use with Am in* 
Zorru &. the new PPC 

graphic* cards 
scandoiiblcrs and the 
EZPC-Tower system. 

All ronilara Offli »«i i a-yr 
warranty with at tonal Hfr ai-sta 
mairHen*!!"'. 
, Spodal pKlng en scantkiublDn; 
tlickieiaaara. bauaht "ai mantle* from /i«r r*s km. 
Honum specs *ra rp*rt asHinr.ifflfw=t™nw*r*t™tfirateBtiha 
niaaiiPiim raSSlalWn. Higher rarlram ra»B (..ISrU) M H«ir 
nonkilione am availatsla and ajv«« morffwBualyralaaing *H»y- 
IJU'lUlMimwimtl'llnnri n*™ msdi/oas oaveTWl by tha 
Am^ns AAiAGfl ctupHil anoare mslncW^Wi moKHriiyn VBrtcai 
rnltcah DT 73Hl amfla maminuni USStto rasduional T24HK56CV. 

14' SVGA0.E8DP.1024H)t76BV#60Hz C129.D6 

1S" SVGA 0.2&DP,l024Hx7eaV@60Hz E1 69.^5 
17" SVGA O.2BDP.128i0Hx1 024VO 60 Hi £299.95 
1 ■' SVGA 0.26DP,1600H)(12aOV«"75HiE399.9S 



bun*q 




Apollo Accelerators 

- from jaxt £44,95! 

Turbo I230LC "OBOE CSSUHz. 

f'S iHJPSJ - max BUS Jutt E44.S5 

Oprtlone: !5V33Mhz FPU +E10.IW 

MHU (non-EC) irersion ♦ttO.OQ 

33MHz version (7 HIPSJ +C5-0u 

A6O0 ■03tW33MM* , MMU/FPU (7 Hips) to 32MB ■ TS9.95 

flt2uQ. , 040ra5MhtfMMUtPPU' 11 3 MIPS) - 

Al 2QO 'C4 0r33HhzfflnMUrF PU ■ (26 MIPS) - 

A12O0 •04a/40Mhir-MMU, , FPU- (M MIPS) - 

AiaiO 'OSC/SOMrizffllMUJFPU* tJ9 MIPS) ■ 

Aiaeo twataOiinimiiUrTPy (51 mipb>- 

"Sh teWiMKir. HBM rtoiv*r r^-J Mt^ SJ"S I™"' 

w .«*» *«* -*»** ?^.S=Tp^ 

16MB -£29-95 32MB-(-t9.9> s,«*.nmiHi^»ni*it. 



Hew from Eyetech! The EZWriter Amiga 
CD Writer system - fr<itn £249.95 ^ 

MakeCD-parsortal sotrware with SCSI S 

AT API TAG CD-Writer -support. 

CD-writer systems availahle for A12fl0 S 

A10O0 Amiga sifStems - internal or eidernsl. 

Eirtenswe CO audio and data writing support. 

Backup 650MB in multiple sessions 1f> El .W! 
M*heCD (ATAPI/SCSI> totlware - CSa.S'S 
lOt&lsnk CD disks w^2W'lter ■ £10.00 

CDPIus EZWHIertowof ivstem 2/Bk + MafceCD e/m 
CDPIuS-Oold EZWriler system zJfi* + MstaCD srW 
CttPlus-WrroT EZWrlter system 2tS* * MakeCO srw 
With i:zt:&3Ei/f. *f-*uy * W aw ga e Mw & CDROV i/w 
Wiik EZOUHH fcft J*-»*v * J«.ku.t™N« * EZ-iW-. «n» 

&9«xd J»w CDJ^ - send far details.' 
SX32MK2 - IMftW 

SXJ2Pro50 - MUi 

ssaaProwEC- rami 
A 1200 Hard drives , LS12 0,Zips l 

Thir*ir« ol buy*^ a BkS (Jive? Donl waste yoi*r mriney on ANt'bM 
ov€ft 4 KB as the Aniga CS doean't suppon It! (2*82- 1 bytes g^rj 
Thay appear ig ^ory but w/amnte thff PDfl alter 4.3QB into lha dn»M 




ftMLH 

r tss.iS 

f 268. 95 

etaf ■» 




Amiga IDE, ATAPI. 
CDROM and removable 
media enhancement s/w 
Onb avaiLible from Ej etech. Probably the unH hard drive/ 
CDROMrXSl2WZIP/SyQuest software you'll *v«t need, 

EZ-n>Esrw CM?5 



EZ-IDE 



111 



TV (WW EZC»-MM frr^A Fhn fa m ui l W 4-devke hujferrd 
interlace with AlPCfram E/rtffC* -/a* jtJ*W 

Hitfi poitamiancB Jdwa iiHemfli cunlHH cucuHiy *a*flntni 1or ppflfiiy 

mpamjeosmifof aecelaralBd AiarjOa. 

Oomrn wfltl EjeUch ATAPUGDflQM BOH«aii« by *e ai*»r t* IDE&* 

t2fiin.«*i*r«'01>HQ«f«flii™ "/wf .„._ 5*!! 

eK&^^CJMaHf^iirfW^^Mvri^TJcmW-ilMlfcaiirD. M 

Ktfi-VMIi'* »!«> Ml CZJBE iAv and «- * *4-w«y »Ulm 



Supports LS1M Dp. J". SyUuart and (JIH*r UK/AX API 
iBn^.arjIS^nndgffilnwa: A.UTOWA1CALLY. Ineajtta 
E v enrh's IDE Z)pP"ap Teals. 
. Qpiniia«io£ ivand4nwip=*'n™* n, ;aai*irnal"sliy. 
Elmralaa Va*franSt6<'nqt*iia«« 
CkIb.16H.is CDflOWl supped mtfytang m.jlndttictiBno«B 

dheoi diynat *isd transfer. COK emUaitKii' . nign 

partonaancBHesyiMin suciMHl Mr Ainga. UK and PC 

Hoaij-io-iMi**n*p«i NeMndM B «wBv to tonugd parts IDElJTtjJw* U9.95 

lor ra^atcn cr.d^ar, ««, ■» 'a^ir-rd* u9fE «™d JJW , - ^ t „.^ ui ™ ) 

IDE-ft"SI7 and Atap Pn1>. "^ 



If hCHifthl with any 
EZtl> Iff, Zip ™- 
LSUfltlrivL' (MM 

I pKruClr fnirn 
Evettch CI>P1W 



All Hi»w ™w rwrty-m-uM wit. WB3.0 prfllnslaltad 4. wea.» ir«aF s* 

All drrrta ever 2MMBw™ with u«' *a IW r^alay ^""a O" 1 ' ha « h <*< 

MMb .mjlhniadB aulhoang srftirare pnanslallad. ccnlrgurad Eind ***** 

TvwerDrives (X5" 2$mm high; all sited in G0>: 
1 7- E99 96- 2 1GB - £109.95, 3-2K1B ■ S1 29.95; 4-3GB - £H 
LS JS£J S Ztp cfnves (ATAPl iff - BZiDE needed): 
LSI 20 (HD floppyrl 20MB cart) ■ £79.95; 3x1 20MB carts 
Zip dri™ (.Mae emurn eompal) - £79.85; 3jc100M& can 
2.5" instantDrives for the A600i 'A 120WSX& 

20Me An Bnliy-la^w dmre t(Xtt>n £X3£/A&00 

lTttHB An»nlrylprtHlnwilnrir*SK3aPri» , A1zOr> 

7JDMB AdriirtMrsomuaA12ai«XKPrauson! 

14GB A t«gti paftonrjiKB *h« lor power ui«i* 

1JGB T-iip.ciaia. drive tor Bill A120*Si3SPra 



'•2! 31 

ri4*.M 

tints 

£176*5 




pAd3f5 IVw«rir> PPC + 'Q46/'06O Accelerate* 

Without SCSI (not upgradeable) 

A130O 160 MHi BOSe PPC with ■0AarSSrtlMl**PU Only Q 
A12W ISO MHz Was PPC With ■06W5WWMU/FPU -o^'y 
AliDQ 240 MHz 603* PPC with ■□4u/25/MMUrFPU - On^y i -■ 
A1ZD0 £40 MHi eQ3e PPC with ■Oftu/sOrHMU/FPU - Only | .- 
With taetoiy-fititf onboard fasl-SCSI H mferfeee 

- add just i-i' to the above prices 



STOP PRESS! filiZZutdVisitifi Permedin 2 FCC 
graphics card available mid-July! VttbeUevahti 

quality and speed - So Zarro shits needed.' 
4MB card ■ £168.95 ■ or just £I3i.95 with a Pli 
8MB card - £219.95 - orjust U9H.95 witkit Pft 



Th 



I 



lagm 
yetecl 

teas Guntht 
- Amigu Foi 
■Just £5 



IPru, ArtEnacr, 
DPalrnS) vis ARE 
notoScapie Jor 

•just £3% 

Ddets of Koda*. 



■Msra dependant 
rPra, ArtEflect. 
OPalni5) via AR 
es like If* Po.ru 



ier for yo 



I Eyetecb Amiga Parts and Price Index 
August iyyj( issues 

ten and adapters - El-Key & DlY rower cootponerrrs 

€ZKY Amiga'PC k<b -> A1 200 kbd ribbon cable 33.95 

(K A12QOE2Key.Sp-;.5oadptf.A40ao isbd bun*? B9.95 

MM Amiga/PC *b- *A1 200 nb cai-~Win95 laid 49.94 

**-2/3 2 5"j'44way -:■ 3.5'r40w*4w 4 nilg l*Mk« 1 1 ,95 

■HD-3/5 3 5" ZirVSyQuesAfD&r-lD brkl'pt -?5 - bay 5.9S 

P6P AmigavTPC k/b adapter 5p din-F -*«p m/d-M 5.95 

* BD-6P5.P Amig*FC kbd adapter Sp mindin-F ->5ptJ-M 5.96 

BD-MF 5p DIN. M - 5p DIN F k,Ti ex cable 1 7 S5 

Tower faceplate adapter tor A12D0 mt f- U B.95 

0^0-TWR 34-34 way cable and faceplate for DFO 12.9* 

tees *nd adaptors ■ A 1200 mttiornet 

BNQJ BNC T-piaca 2>W + 1)fF 4.96 

Elhamaf BNC coax 1errmna1or 50H 4.95 

PCMCIA atrterrrel card with Amtga'PC drvrs 89.95 

Hydra PCMCIA Mhsrnet an! with Amiga drvrs 129 95 

Elhornrjl OMWflNC-F KXW ft* BU r Wf MB 

CfO*ssdf«sl«lp«if , 'HJ45tofSiav4Wcfri S95 




n-*5A 







and adapters - Fllcleerllxers, VGA adapters, monitor leads 
'GA-SDSL2 EZ-VGA-MK2 si'douWer 23F-1 5F PLL uigsradabl* 74.95 
EZ VGA-Plus ffclwrii^r 23F 1SF PLL H3 BS 

5DBL2 1r> SD-fiCkerillier u!Q 5(1 M 

EZ-VGA internal A 1 200 s-'doubler iwn-upgrad'la 59.45 



VQA-SDFF 

'JA-5DUG 

GA-INT 
VGA-INTFF 
•,'GASDSE 
VGA-SPSEF 
VGA-UHBF 



EZ-VGA- internal At20Q ftakerlixer 89 95 

EZ-VGA.SE 4/*H*t*r J3F- 1 5M XH not U/g 59 95 

EZ-VQA-SE flickertuer 23F-1 5M Xtfll 33 95 

Amiga 23 pin(f|-15 pin HCHlJ VGA adapler 12.95 

VGA-15MZ3MVGA 15pHD-M -.> 23pD-M Amiga RGB adapter 14.95 

VG.A-15M9F A/ii.rjlcHrnm15pHD-MVGAto9pO-F 9.95 

VGA-BM15F Monitor adapter Bp D-F to ISpHCMui B.95 

VGA-A.MOM Aula Amigai"CV643D nV&ync mewtor switch 39.95 

VGA-BUF Amiga 23pm. F lo 1 5pn*D-F buttered adapter 19.95 

and avlaplerf ■ IDeVATAPI, Uriel, parallel 4 floppy drive 



2C-D$KPL 

2C04 

actwc 

D*CE 
'l-EZCI : 
W-EZCDS&C 



DiskPluS FDD Q'H/S oeris l'I AlZDOirlkpod 69.95 

Mk4 4-91 U v..'A?20O CD S/w 39 95 

Mk4 4-dev txif IDE lit w.-3j<40,Zx44 13c<ti cabs ^9.95 

MM 4 dflv turf IDE ill wn**0, ZK*Jcafcs. EZIDE S9 95 

Econ&ny 4-dav bul IDE u'l *;*-KB CD i.'« 34 95 

Ecofl i-dev but IDE i.t *.'3rfa a« 12cm cabs 34.95 



Cables - HO, COROM, floppy power splitters for lower systems 

CABPW-IW-»F Power convafler cab HD-M -> FD-F 4.95 

CABPW'SW^IHIF MD.'FDpwrsplitWrMD.M^InWLVFniFD-F 6 95 

CABPW-3W-2F FDOpc*er spliher 4pM->Z!iFD-F B.95 

CABPW-SW-2M HDrCC pwr apUHBr 4p-M ->2x 4p-F 15cm B.95 

CABPW-3W-2H1F HD.'FOpwr splitter HD-M-»3irfHD-F' - lxP0-F B.95 

CABPW 3W-3H NO pow«r spmt«r MD M * MDf 9,95 

CAB-HD-FW^TN <p-M -j- *p-F HtwCD portef cab axt r>.gm B.95 

CAB-HD-FH^ S3p-M-floppy -> 4p-F H&CD pwf 0.9m 9.9S 

CDftOM f¥*1rtrrt rnttutflno EZ. Tower i VT^PT *(*n«*T#* 

■ CD^CP-ZOK-SE CDHuI-SE SySl*fH 20 S(*fid wilh CDRQM iHt SS.95 

* CD-CP-32X-SE CIWToa-SE ayatem 32 gpeed wilh CDROM ana 1 19.95 
CD-OT-20X CDPfcjH OeBklcp 20 speed wilh CDROM &"* 1 19.95 
CD-OT-32X CDflu* DeskSop 32 spaed with CDROM S.V 1 3S95 

■ CD-fT-SSK C0«w EZ-T(«er 20 sp«d wtttl CDPOM s^v 1BS.95 
CD-FT-32X C&Phe EZ-Towar 32 speed with CCROfcl a/w ED9.95 
C&*IT-2)0M CDPlua MiniTowar 20 Epee<J with CDROM sAy 1 19.65 
CD-MT-32X CDPH*s MiniTower 32 spaed with COROMs/w 139.95 
CP.PL-20K CDP*JS GOW SVSlenri ED spa»g w 1 EZIDC y* 1*995 
DD-PL-32X CDRus QcH syslerr 32 speed wV E7JDE 3/w 1 S9.95 

* ADPT-AUD-CDSE CDPIua-SE AISOftCD audio mixr/adapter 19.95 
ADPT'CDPL'PWR CDPIus-GoW external power ski * HD pwcab 9.95 
CDWrritf tyttttrtt ^rttftwKrt* SZ-lt>*tr t VT/OT buntHti 

"COR-UG-2K8 fUfflWal Ml *iWtaajCQIj| AW. Turn S*995 

CDH-PL-Zne E2W frier-Gold ejitemar a** WiMakeCD 1 299. 35 

C&R-DT-Sxft EZWrier Desitoo 2* spe«t w.'MakieCD S99.95 

* CDR-ft#r-2*B F?'A>iBr MiniTower 2.'9 speed w'MakaCP 29995 
CDP-FT-ZiE EZHMn Full EJMower 2'B speed w.'MakaCO 379.90 
CDR-CDSE-UG EZCD-SE-t^&t+^ajr cabs*CDROM&'w w.'CDR SO.OO 
Cr?R CDM4-UG EZCDMfc4+40+44way cabs +EZIDE s- 1 ™ wrCDR 30 03 
CDfl-DSK-10 Hecordable CD media iWORM) 74 nuts 19.95 
DVK-mC D-T.AO-P MakeCD TAO (Pj Amiga CD rac s,'w w,' ATAPi 3B. 95 
FF rnmu systems. MiniTamrmrsklap cases S, accessories 
CASe-FT Foil PC 10w*f, 250W P5U, ffl«l«W» to* A1 2D0 

* CASE-FT-lZoa Full A12O0 Tower 250WPSU.LED adpt.FD cab 
CAS6-FT.EXKT EZ-Tower conversion kit - No PC lower 
CASE'FT*KfT EZT >:piil lor self tx^vorsi^A 

■ CASE-FT-PLyS Full Af2«3 EZfWR, EZKEV LI. Wim» kW 
CASE-DT DeBJttop caaa with 200W+ p&u for HDrCDROM 
CASE-MO" MiniTower case wlh2«lW*psu lor CD.-MD 
ADPT-AUO-E7TW EZTwr #v*0 r**rViuJa(5(er Irjr A12CKWQDH0M 
ADPT-SCSl-EZTW EZTwr SCSI adpl 3DOT1 2xCefi(5DF . 1 xlDCSOf 
CAB-SER-SSQ 9pDM-=-9pDF SurfSq EZTwr ser axln cab 50cn» 
SVGA monitors ■ reouire xcwnovublcr */cr 1/1 to use *t> AmiQ* moO*t 

* MOW- 14- 28 14- SVGA 29DP 1024x7668 60Hi ■ 3yO S. 129 95 
MON-15-.Z8 15"SVGArj.2eOP 10(2<li7B6«6rjHj- 3y«O.S. 1B3 95 
MCrN-17-.ZB 17 - SVQA D.2SOP 1Z80)(1024eBDHl - SyirO.S. Z99.95 

* UON-1 7-.2S 1 V mon 1 3SMH2, 0.2SDP 1 SOOx I260S 76Hz 3S9.9S 
ADPT MONSDSE E«t wdoubler 23F-15M non-u/'ga*/* «v -nonit'T 4500 
ADPT-MQN-5DBL2 Ek[ ^dmiblfir 23F-15F upgradable wr my 
ADPT-MON-SDFF Est i'dcujbler with f.-rtiner 23F-15F w.' monirof 
ADPT-MOM-INT lot EZ-VGA s.''doublar ron-upgrarlle ml monitor 



4995 
99.95 
39.95 
79 95 
14S95 
39.95 
39.95 
19-95 
19.95 
9.95 



ZCDSE'CEEcc" 4-dev but IDE i.f ft.'3«4Q- 2>:44cabs, EZIDE 44 95 Di&W cameras intf Amiga digital camera totiware 



rtt(t>tl 




0± 4-dewB EiD-E VI 'or A4000 w.'COROM & 'w 19 9E 

. I'-U r r? Interface tar sld Sony FDD 1or DFO BBD.KB 14.95 

SER-PPL Porlflua 2x 460kb s*r + high speed par port 79.95 

SER-PTJR PortJunior- 460KB SBnaUf far AlZOO 39.95 

1/3 boards amf ttiAptet* 

Z2-A12,'1 A12DD 2II adapter with 1 211 stol 39 95 

22-A12/7 A1200ZII adapter w' ?kZII + SitlSA slots 149.95 

Z2-A1Z7/UG A1200 Zll adapter 1 -=-7 sM ur'g (frit) 79-95 

: A 4-C&43D bundle i 249.95 

Auto Amiga.'CVf543D nvsync monilor swiloh 39 95 



* CAM-FIJJ-DS7 Fuju D39 f.am, psu LCD disp niwrn crd w.' sAv 239.95 

DVfi-CAM-CAS CamControl£i''wlorCaaioOVlfl''im. , .5Xi 39 95 

DVR-CAM-FUJ CamConlrol s/w lor Fuji DS&.'DS? 39 95 

DVR-CAJM-KOD C^rnCpfUnjI l/w tar K«l3k DCaO'DC25 39 95 

DVFI-CAJM-MIN CamControl sto tar Mirotla Dimage V 39 95 

DV K-C AM-OLV CamConlrol s/w tar Olympus 420LA620L 33.95 

INT-121-PTJR-SP PortJnr hi-speed ser M pur wrlh CamConr.ro! s-'w 3OO0 



'■VQA-AMC*J 
VGA-10H15M 
-22-BB 
iSA-ETH 
SA-MIO 



lDp IDC-F hBBder->\/GA 15pHD-M lor CV64-3D 9.95 



HJ^Zips 

lyon AHY£rmve 

2-1 byias actual 
•B- info :tia driw. 

U iiiorjU icr C r 
inrf *>i(SrtA«nrB) 
and r»*ty-»-ru<l 

GB): 

I.3GB-EH9, 

id): 

KB carls £34 

*B cans FJ39 




GG2 Zorro2 brigBboard loi- PC ISA perijhs 119 95 

NC2C03 l?A alhemer card BNg 1pr &G2- BB 19 95 

Mul1l-I,'0 ISA card ZxIDE,2)c£ER.1j(P 14.95 

PortPlua* - Zorno ixSetiai - expanse bus W.95 

2x5 -lxP expansion for INT-Z2-PPL3V4 59.95 
i cable adapters - audio 1 JlUftl* 

JD-CD COROM mvt*dT audio cab .6m 1- ZxRCA pig 9.95 
KHMDi RCA(phono)-M -> RCA-M-RCA-F mm lead 1 ,8m 6 95 

JD-MJ.'PH a.fwnni ii riiiiiijarti->2!iph£<v>-M pfcigs 1 2m 5.95 

iUD-RCA RCA(phono)-M -> 2sRCA-F adaplsr 2.5ti 

iUD-RCA-G RCA(phono)-M ->2xRCA-F gokl plated adapt 3.50 

C-I.5M AC power OlWelJA plug -slECskt 15m 2.95 

19.95 

EC Ftewlrabla IEC monitor pig for PSUs/MT/DT 4.95 
i cable adapters - Sofia), mooem. phone. SCSI, printer 

LTe£5'W.>DB25'FRS232*i<mc4fc2rti 7.95 

DB25-M -:. DB25-F H3232 extn CfltJ D.5m 6.95 

Hull modern tatilfi w 1 D9F a D25F al e«ch end 3.95 

3pQM-:-9pDF £urt3g EZT m ser e*m cab 50cm 9.3S 

25p-F to 9pM senal P £232 adapter 4.95 

2Sp-M to 9pF serial R5232 adaptor 4.9S 

1Qm BT ax1n cable t 2 rtay phone adapler 9.95 

FCC&B4S lo BT4 modem phone lead 1 m 5.95 

SCSI cable DB25-M -? Cen(50-M im 9.95 

SCS-25M/25M SCSI cable DB25M-DB25M mac lyte 9.96 

l-SCS-SOM^WM SCSI cable Cer-iriSOM-sCenli-SOM 1m 9.9S 

PAR-FULL Bidirectional prT.ier cable an pins Dormected S.y; 

A atb/e adapter* • VGA/Mr swlfchbcimt A cabtet, Scart cable* 





Amiga COAOM. CDWrilar, lOtVATAfl. primer, scanner t video s/w 

DVR-EZiDE EID&ATAPI H&'iCDROM,7IP.1.S120. , SvQ*1 <*vr 34 95 

DVR F7IPE CU P.'* upgrSrt*- If EZIDE Fnxn ctimpei prcducl 19.95 

DVH-EZIDE-S? ElDEVAT API enbancef.'CDROM a/w bundle pn 16.95 

UvR-r<KCr>P MakBCD(P.TAO) Amiga CD writing s/w 3S.95 

DVR-SQ3 .: Jix3 w/ 1 Aifliga tcanner driver 

DVR-PH5 PholcSeope UMAX-SCSI Amiga scanner driver 59.95 

DVfi-ENPfi EnPrinL Amiga printer dvr tar pra 03l'l97 Epsons 9.95 

i DVR-TB-PR6 TurboPhnl 6 s Amiga printer driver English 38 95 

ADPT-SQ3'PAR SQ3 *rj*p*er Epton sraririer->pw pit oaHe 9.95 

r scNFR'a BDL2 UMAX award-wnig SD3I A4FB scanner wr s.'w 179.95 



KBD-WIM95 

MOD-ExT-14 

MOU-WHI 
*TKB-AM 
■PSU- 100 

P5U-230 

PSU- Al ZOO 
tSPK-16VM 
•SPK-60'A-.NT 

VID-CAM-CCH. 

tflD-CAM-PSU 

D SK-btiD 

NET-REF 
■VIDCXT 



85.00 
45.00 



rviJilJffl*i 

ucelerafon 

■Only £244, 
-Only £449. 

-Omy£3e8. 

t Only rstf*. 



dia 2 ri'( 
heiievabte 
teededl 
vith a PPC 
vith a PPC 



K 
-MM 
■MF 

,-MM 

AR-CMP 

AR-RGB 



Pu^l rniiriik:f A kTi *;wilr:htiOK 19.95 

5p UN M -5p DIN M k,'D cable 1.2m 7.95 

lip DM-HD - r&p DF-MD VGA exl cable 2m 1 98 

15p DM-HD - '.5|j DM-HD VGA t:nb* 2m 9.95 

Amrga comp video |RCA|+2)(Audio lo SCART 12.95 

Amiga 23p+2xRC A toRGBTVSCART+audio 12.95 




■ HD. COflOV. floppy, dock pout dab *nd A 1209 MP power 

2.5" I44F) 10 3.5" (40F) d«1« cab **ipl 1rjr A1 200 9.95 

i'cwei splitter floppy drive Ic hard drive 4 floppy 9.95 

44->40way 3.5 J HD data. A pwr caba -A1200 14.95 

A1 200 hj* 3.5" hard dkive lining xit 24,96 

22waj-Fs2 A'P&Tj r':lotk pfirt CAblfi 9trw w'a 5.00 

34way-F x2 FDD ribbon cable tor lower 9.95 

40 way IDE cabla 2 connector 20cm 5.00 

40Way ID&HD/CD Cable 3 conlr 1m o/A l*ri 9.96 

4Crw-F »3 HD'CD.'IDE CflDle Z0*4O-«Jcrin rVa 9.95 

Custom cabla 3«40way IDEupIo i.5m 19.95 

AIJOOIDEst ='iM wilhmtgs 16cm 9 95 

44way (2.5" HD) cable 2 enir, 1 3cm aJa 9.95 

44way (2.5' HD) cable 2cntr. 60cm rv'a 19.95 

44way (2.5' HD) cable 3 crur. 1 2cm o'a 1 2.96 

44way (Z.5" HD) 7+1 | 7cin.3<;n(r,24orTi <i'a 14.96 

44w»y (2.5 - HD) cable said wilh CD'HD 13cm B.00 



Windows 95 keyboard with 5-pin AT DIN ptug 19. 
MprJeiiri AT14.4oW14 41ai4-EU psmleUab 19 

Atnga -riouse- - whife-'ceam -wltfi mousemai 8- 
Amiga 1rac<ball 3-:.r : - replaces sic mouse 14. 
lOOwPSLHi: rr»m)a 



23OJ250W replaMfnenI PSU for MT.iDT7FT 29 

A12CO 33W PSU (original) 90 days warranty 19 
f6W PMPO speakers wr PSU 3.5*nm.|act 10 

Internal moonling COW PMPO .speakers/amp 24. 
Crjlrjyr vid»rj««1 flimm «anpC4#t vk(« 129, 

PSU tor colour video camera 9 

EBOKB blank disketlas duplication quaMbf. Pk 50 14 
Internel relgrgnce book 4 

CocMbI Amga vxJecconferenc'g s.rw by ProOad 39 
Aecelermtora ■ PovrwrPC with fjtfrjjrrj co-processor 
.ACC'PPC-16-4025 Bliz , dPPC603f , 160MHz*tW)ffi5vFPUfnDSCSI 244 

.Acc-ppc-iefifi5n BW4 woeoart somhx*o<w5( r;i 44g 

ACC-PPC-16S-4025 Bliz'd PPCEDaieOMHz^MQ.BS/FPUi'&CSl^ 29B. 

ACC-PPC- 1 6S-6050 Bliz'd PPCSOa'l 6uMHz»060r5a/FPUf SCSI -2 528. 

ACC-PPC-24.4025 Bliz'd PPC60a'240MHz-040.'25.'FPU »o SCSI 368 
ACC-PPg-24-6050 BliJ'd PPCS03'24WIH i -080i , 5O.'FP1J no SC« 

ACC-PPC-24S-40Z5 Bliz'd PPCB0a24OMHZru4n.'25'f FUr'SGSf-^ 418. 

ACC-PPC-24S-6050 Bliz'rd PPC60a^4rjMHz*lWfl.'5&FPU..'SCSt-2 648. 

Aec#f#**tor* ■ Apoiio satfiK 

ACC-uBD-5n A|inllfiO«C MMU.'FPU5OMHrA120Oacc*l 2«8 

■ACi;-060-66 Apollo C€C MMU.'FPU 66IWIH2 A1ZQ0 accel 319 

ACC-040-25 Apollo C4C MMU'FPU 25MHz Al 200 acoel 128 

•ACC-040-H Apfjllp 04C MMU 'FPU 33MHz A 1200 iiccol 158 

ACC-D4D-4D Apollo C4C MMU.'FPU 40MHZ A1ZO0 accel 155 

. ACC-30EC-2S Apollo 03025MHz no MMU/FPU (8MBma!() 44. 

AOC-Jt*KMH Apollo C30.-25MHi.'MMU na FPU iBMBman) 54 

ADC-30LC-25 Apollo 03C.25f.1HZ.MMU.'FPU .;afv»B:rm.i 64. 

*ACC-30EC-33 Apollo 03fl€C'^3MHz no MMU.'FPU (BMBmax) 49. 

ACC-30EM H Apollo 030v33MHi,'MMU na FPU i6MBma«) 59, 

ACC-aOLC-W Apollo 03ai,-33MHj.MMU'FPU /aivlB' *9 

FPU-EC'M-33 33Mfra PLCC FPU purd wifl) Apollo 3OEC/30EM 10. 

ACC-630-33 Apollo 03C MMU.'FPU 33MHz ASM ace to 32M 69. 

ACC-630-33-4 A600 accel 03ft'33MHcMM^Fpu.'4MB 79, 

ACC-630-33*S ABW«j«H)»3gMH/-Wir.1J-rpu'6MP 89 

AOC-S30-33»1S ABDO accel D30.''33MHz>MMU*PU.'fEMB 99. 

■ ACC-630-33-32 A600 accel 03o.'33MHz'MMLVFPU.'32MB imax) I It 

Mrjrrio*? - $imm*. zip r*n) A FPV* 



MEM-16rVB-72P 
MEM-32W&-72P 
WEM-1MB-72P 
MEM-9M&-72P 
■MFMZIP20P 
FPU-PGA-4D 
FPU-PLCC-33 
PT^EXT-PLCC 
ACC-4il60-SSKT 



7Zpn 15MB 3Z biislmnn lor Amiga 39. 

72 pin 3Z MB 32 bit simrn tor Amga 49. 

72 pat 4MB 32 tal simm 70 ns 9. 

72 pm 8MB 32 bil simm lor Amiga 19. 
1M6{2ehip)6Qns Zip RAM HMS51440O.6 Pg md 14 
MCBBBB2 PGA FPU 40MHZ 0« lOf 50MHZ 
MCBBBBZ PLCC FPU 33MHZ 

PLCC exlusclrjf 1ool ter 33Mhz FPU 9, 

Apollo 1 24000 2nd simm socket & titling 20. 



Wff disks, k/s flOUS. menuar's etc 

SYS-WB3-DSK Amiga WB3 diskssS 4- Eyetech HD install 14, 

S¥S- WB3-S€T Afivrjs WB3 disks i5 -t W<jrt».-,-h -nani nil 18, 

SYS-W&S.I-DSK Amiga Wc-kbennhS 1 disks x6 .;.w HD msti 14, 

*SVS-KS3.1-ROM A12D0 fOcrtstad 3. 1 ROMcf^ss (2a»pa) 2B. 

•SVS-KS3 1-SET A1200K''s3.l POM&SWB3.1 oskxS (no b«*s> 36. 
EZPC-Tavrer & Siamese systems 1 components 
CDR-BAHE-a'8-SP Imemal ATAPI CD-R 2iw 8* viq wilh EZPC p*g1BB. 

•EZPC-SIA-CF3 ■ EZPC SiSyri , Enar13.2,'B4 1 r32KAi2v.'mpaQyA4acnr 969. 
EZPC-SIA-CF3-UG EZTower.'EZKeyAbd tf g 1o EZPC-SIA-CF2 B79. 
PSW-W95j'SS97 Wmdowi 95 8 LOlu* S<Vi»rl4uite 97 burirjl* 99. 

3CAN-3CEX-6KSP Mmate* ScanE»p»eas BOOOSP w/PC SCSI card 99. 
SYS-SiA-ETH Siamese sys2.5 w.'PC.Arrpga eBwmel IBB. 

SYS-SIA-R26 Siamese system software RTG v2.5 M 

• 3Y3-1CP-SIA Mkarnl TCP/IP sJack (or Amiga {Siamese only) 19. 

SYS-TCP-MIA Hhami TC P,'IP slack lor Amiga (feg'n 1aa pad) 54 

CD32, SX32 t accessories 

ADPT-KBD-5X32P SX3Z Pro PC k/6 (Ujapler cable 10cm, 9, 

CD32-JOT CD32j'SX32Joypad 9, 

CD32-PAL CD32 console wnh 18Wpsu f joypajd , RF toad 149, 

SX32-MK2 SX32 Mk2 Ram«lock)'FPU sxpantfer for CD32 1 49 

SX32-P40EC SX32Proa30EC iDMnz Slmirl 10 E4MB. FFU Sk1 1 99 



SX32-PSC SX3Z Pro SOMHz 'BSa.M^U Hmm, FPU srt 

A 1200 Magic PetH* & naicisarits. 



■Ml 



Hani A floppy drive. COHOM, LSI10 A Zip mechanisms t) cases 

CD20-BARE Bare 20 speed CDROM mscha/itam 44.96 

CD32-BARE Bare 32 speed ATAPI CDflOM mechanism 59.95 

FDD-ITL-12O0 Rrjrjlacerrsem A12TO600 rtl FDD SSf*B 24.95 

FDD-ITL-BARE Bare 1 .44.'SBO FDD for tower {needs iff) 19.95 

FDD-ITL-D.'C.'I Twrtm*B0Kl3FDD(Sony.rEZDFtVcabb«Kie) 34.95 

FDD-ITL-D.'I Twr uMi 88OK0 FDD (Sony.'EZDFOl No cable 29.95 

HDS-n ?1MB2 5"h*rddriv* 90 d*ys warranty 29.95 

HDZ- 1 7D 17DMfl2.5'harddnva 69.9S 

HD2-S40 S40MB 2.5* Hard Orive HM 

MD2-720 720MB 2 5" hard drive I » H 

HD?-14 1 4fiB 2 5 - rtaif$. drive tof Amiga *i*B.95 

ND2- 1.8 1 .8GB 2.5' Hard Onve 1 79,95 

MD3-1 7 1 7GBrx3 5*HDnon|ns1antDn.ForTowr 99 95 

HD3-2 1 2.11QB rx3.5-non-lnstanlDrfi*e1ortwr 1DB.95 

HD3-2 5 2 56GB I k x3.5- IDE HD TowarDmve - Arm^a 119.95 

MD3-2 56 2 564GB 3 5" InsianiPn.. 199 95 

■ f'D3-3 ? 3 2tiB 1*13.5- IDE drive for tower 129.95 

HD3-4.3 4.3GB 1-K3.5" IDE drive 1or lower 149.95 

HD3-LS1ZO Panaioni: LSI 20 lloppy 'optical 1 4/1 20MB 79.96 

HD3-LS120'CT1 Single 120 MB Hulrirjgo for LS120 drisr* 14.95 

HD3-LS1 20-CT3, 3-piick of 1 20MB (nominal) LS120 carts 34.95 

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Net: s-ales. info ©eyelech. co.uk 



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III.. 






GAME REVIEW 






afe 



This month sees, 
the release of 
two major 
releases, 
Foundation and 
Genetic Species 
How long is it 
since two 
games of this 
quality appeared 
during the same 
month? 



* 
s. 




Genetic 
Species 




■ Price: £29.99 ■ Developers: Vulcan Software/ Marble Eyes 

■ Available from: Weird Science © +44 (0)1 1 G 2463800 

Swap bodies like there's no tommorrow 
and kill stuff... what more could you want? 



I'm running down that damn corridor 
again. Every time I hear a clank - and 
that's all the time - I grip the rifle 
tighter. If one of those scouts is around 
the corner, I don't know what I'll do - 
the last three I ran into nearly killed me until I 
was able to lob 
that grenade 
and take off 
back to relative 
safety. I've 
gotta find some 
first aid fast- 
There aren't 
any good can- 
didates left for 
a takeover - all 
those petty 
guards were 
bothering me 
and I had to 
waste them. I 
sure wish I still 
had the ammo I 
blew on them, 
not to mention 
their flesh 
around for a 
convenient body swap. 

But as long as I.., what was that? Whirling 
around a second too late, I catch sight of the 
security officer I forgot was lurking in that 
section of hallway. And as the blood pours 
down the screen, all 1 can think of is - damn, 
it's been a long time since I was able to save 
the Game. 

Genus and Species 

Comparing Genetic Species to Doom, 
Quake, or your garden-variety clone thereof 
does it a disservice. Rather than try to rein 
vent the "running around shooting things" 
wheel, the Marble Eyes team have sought to 
use the concept of a first-person, realistically 
rendered terrain engine as the core of a 
Game of investigation, strategy, suspense. 
and shooting things. 



That's not to say that you can't have a 
good time just running around blowing awayj 
the bad guys in grand fashion, The weapons 
fire impressively and the bad guys die pretti- 
ly. But there's a whole lot more in here to 
discover. 




A lost! The Einh is lilt! 

Be afraid... 

Since "bright future" science fiction settin ; 
don't make for very good shooting action, 
this Game, like so many others, is set in a 
"dark future." In the early 2200s, humani. 
in virtual enslavement at the hands of a f 
select megacorporations. Nearly everyone 
has been fitted with mind-control devices, 
except for a select few who have evad&: 
system to form the Counter Force Alliance 
(CFA) who work to break the stranglehold of 
the corporations. The CFA has been dev- 
ing a technology called the "Bioshifter" to 
take advantage of those mind-control 
devices by using the shifter to take completd 
control of corporate employees. Some very 
strange things have been happening on a 
large asteroid, including huge military 



GAME REVIEW 






Eyes 



/V 

ant? 

have a 
'viny away 
weapons 
die pretti- 
nere to 



1 settings 
action, 
set in a 
imanity is 
of a few 
■en/one 
evices. 
vaded the 
M Id nee 
ileholri of 
i develop- 
er" to 
ol 

complete 
■me very 
g on a 
iry 






iups and the unexplained apparent self- 
destruction of strategic bases. So the CFA 

decided to activate one of the 
B»oshnfters in the remaining base, 

n t ally, your mission is simply to explore 
md try to gather clues as to what might be 
going on, and unsurprisingly the base's secu- 

.vill do everything in their power to elimi- 

■ ihe intruder (you). But, through cunning 
and superior firepower, you have to fight 
VOiir way through levels too numerous to 

•it, gathering keys, dues, arid even more 
weaponry to expose what eventually turns 

to be an elaborate conspiracy and stop it 
before it can do any more damage, 

Saving humanity the 
hard way 

e's no way to dither around this issue - 
the 3D engine is just awesome. Once you 
(pen the first door and are greeted by the 
row of flashing running 
i, something I've never 
seen done nearly as well in 
any Game of this type, peri- 
od. You very quickly get the 
feel that you are there, ru tr- 
ying through the subter- 

■an corridors of some 

l distant atmosphere, 
The baddies swarm around 
you so fast you hardly notice 
they have a tendency to 

■,:■" in a manner vaguely 
reminiscent of Breathless, 
and the weaponry fire is so 
crisp and, well, satisfying 
-ou only care how they 
not how they walk. A 
I :e touch is that weapons 
do not always fire straight 

vard into the center of 
■.creen (because most 
human beings have trouble carrying guns 

a rely in the middle of their bodies), but a 

: oint gun sight helps you call your shot. 

Genetic Species is full of unique little 

ikies. The artists really avoided "blocky 
computer graphics syndrome" in spades - 

re are a few things you can get "too close 
lo". usually very skinny objects like rotting 

:;ses from mishap experiments, but it's 

setter than most Games, where merely 



approaching a wall turns it into a big visual 
pizza. The element of surprise is used to 
great effect - there will be times when you 
wonder where all those guards could have 
poured out from, only to realize that you 
should have reacted to the warning signs 
much earlier. Doors open and close around 
you - somewhere in the distance, but still 
audible - and will keep you guessing as to 
who might be coming, and when. And then 





I wail a ki||er fin, I wmii blow things up ! 



Tools of the trade 



All good things must come to an end, 
and here are the tools Genetic 
Species gives you to get them there 
faster. A game like this needs a nice 
range of decent weaponry, and genet- 
ic Species scores a definite A+ in that 
area. There are weapons by the buck- 
etload r and they're complete with 
some spectacular lighting effects that 
give a real sense of just how powerful 
your latest discovery is. Get hacking, 
shooting and zapping! 



.44 Pistol 

Silenced 
Pistol 

Industrial 
Dril 

Fire Axe 







there's the "Portable Probe Device", or 
"Paradroid Meets Quake." 

The PPD serves two purposes- For 
starters, you can launch it {presumably out of 
the head of the creature you're currently 
inhabiting, which would certainly look inter- 
esting) to shoot into the corridors ahead to 
investigate. It travels forward extremely fast 
and with a wild color scheme (very cinemat- 
ic), and will travel for a few seconds or until 
it hits a wall. The second 
use of the PPD is to take 
over an enemy, in theory, 
any enemy you meet can be 
shanghaied into your cause, 
but some are more vulnera- 
ble to takeover than others, 
and stunning them first 
{either with a stun-specific 
weapon, or sometimes you 
get lucky by whacking them 
with a few probesf helps 
as well, 

When you successfully take 
over a creature, the one you 
had been inhabiting dies 
sometimes, it seemed, tak- 
ing all of his weaponry and 



Mad scientists it 
fair nil ntik 









Tazer 

Flechette 

Flame- 
thrower 

Laser mine 

Hand 
grenade 

Minigun 

Assault 
Rifle 

Rocket 
launcher 

Mine 

Plasma 

gun 







"Don [ laugh, Us 
paid lor." 



GAME RE, 



ammo into the abyss as well, which is rather 
unfortunate, and difficult to justify from a 
design point of view. But the takeovers are 
sometimes necessary or at least extremely 
helpful - certain types of characters I. particu- 
larly engineers and security officers) have 




A Racket laimchers m nut always goad in tlM* alerters. 

access to rooms others simply cannot reach. 
and the physical stature ol still other foes 
makes them attractive to get into small, 
cramped places. Because of this feature, it's 



Know your enemies 



sometimes in your best interest not to sim- 
ply blow away everyone you meet. 

The exploration of the four bases in 
Genetic Species is probably unlike you've 
ever experienced before in a 3D shooter, 
This is nothing like a level of Alien Breed 3D 
or Doom or Quake - kill a dozen enemies, 
find a key, kill another dozen enemies, 
search for secret rooms, exit the level, do it 
all over again in another setting, You will 
have to visit and re- vis it rooms, backtrack to 
pick up weapons you had to drop in order to 
carry other needed items, go back to make 
sure there wasn't a hidden switch you 
missed, take countless elevators up and 
down, all while minding a rather frugal 
ammo supply and. of course, your sanity. 
Add to that the very refreshing rudimentary 
Al of the enemies - they run away from you 
when they're dying, call for help, and even 
try to track you down if you get away from 
them or vice versa. 

To get past all this mad- 
ness, the key you need 
might be two or three full 
floors away, and many eleva- 
tors in the Game have only 
one destination. Fortunately, 
in another interesting wrin- 
kle, you always have access 
to a generally complete 




As a Face Hng«,er, f» tin spit Drains if icil Ipr firrii 

floorplan in every level, which you can owd 
lay on the screen at any time. Certain thine 
like disused corridors or secret hallways a 
chambers don't appear on the map, thou; 
so it is by no means exhaustive. The map 
available even when you first enter a level 
so you can check out the entire floorplan 

t Ti* nippT prahe-crtm. 



9*1 



Genetic Species boasts one of the most expansive and 
varied collection of opponents ever assembled for your 
destroying pleasure. 





No real phy 
reat, but be carr 
to take them o 
f're so frail that 
on't stun them 
'rly, the probe it 



Pencil-nec' 
s with peashoot 
a problem. 




Space Pilot: 



ove like a 



sting like a bee 
this one. They're 
moving but still dan- 



/Wj 




opt 



Action Art- 
ie is a well- 
ed kilting machine, 
jh trying to take over 
,u're in a tough 



Security Soldier: 



id am' 
im, just some 
ds will suffice. 




The Danish pr< 
i materials refer 
in the amusing, if not 
ipletaly intentional, 
is of M an abdominal 
ture/' But he's ugly, 
that which is ugly 
erves to die. 




Face Hugger 



ooks like a 
- cyborg spider but 
is like it takes 
r to kill all of them 

A good strafe of 
e rounds will do the 



or "-like opponent 
ghtning speed and 
t it u ties The invisi- 
tffect is impress 
's even more so 
a gang of three of 
buzz around ynu 
■Doting you to death, 

Almost 
resent in the later 
ages of the Game, thes 
■u£ can make crispy 
gut of you in very 
order. 



ill 



■■■ 



■■■■■■ 



mm 



wummm 



GAME REVIEW 




before you make a single step. It's a little 
(fcappoinling that the secrets you do man- 
age to find still don't appear on the map, 
however. 

Genetic Species makes very good use of 
» range of Amiga hardware. There is a small 
set of preprogrammed resolutions a-nd the 
ibiiity to use most graphics cards, and 
sound is provided through AHI. On a high 
»nd machine, 32Qx2&Q {the top resolution} 
looks just wonderful, far better than you 

j Id expect given the fact that is consid- 
ered "low res" these days, even with double 

■ ring and full 1 audio enabled. Even if 
you're without RTG capabilities, the Game 
moves along at a very good clip for AG A 

irs. And the sound is absolutely fantastic 
- the CO tracks of mood music are very 

ropriate, the constant spooky clanks and 
grinds keep you on edge, and the sound 
affects get gradually more sinister and "icky" 
35 the Game wears on. 

V Dg«l tnufcimi borne. Ms! 



up the menu is all that was required, 
but they really missed this one. 
Finally, I have a iproblem with the 
Bioshifter/probe/taking people over 
premise. If, as the Game alleges, 
we're taking over the bad guys, who 
presumably are friends with the other 




Evolution of the species 

Nobody's perfect. Genetic 
Species has some design 
flaws - some niggling; some 
notable. I had a serious prob- 
lem with the Game's saved 
Game and options screen abi 
ties. Yog can only save your 



shooting 1uel 

dirts. 





GS's tribute 
bo tech and 
icop. Brutally lethal. 
■V grenades and run. 



Disgusting and 
hard to kill. Put 
out of their misery 
t a flamethrower or 
lergy rifle. 



Game when you discover the exceedingly 
rare "save Game powerup" - you can leave it 
there or lug it around, occupying one of your 
three precious inventory slots until you're 
ready to use it, but once used, it's gone until 
you find the next one. In a Game as huge 
and expansive as this one, where killing the 
wrong guy can suddenly make your mission 
much more difficult, maybe even impossible, 
frequent saves would certainly have been 
welcome. 

So would an easily accessible options 
screen, to change screen size, brightness, or 
to reload a saved game. But to do these 
things, you have to locate a computer termi- 
nal. Sometimes, they're in great supply, 
other times you can literally be locked away 
from one and have to use a special keyboard 
combination to quit there's nothing else to 
be dene! Just hitting the escape key to pull 



A 

ll CISC Ikflt 4tK3- 

■'t |tt their iHxi- 

tiQKI. Split SlmllS 



bad guys, why do the other bad guys 
instantly recognize us as "good guys" and 
begin shooting? I would certainly understand 
if they saw or heard us shooting at people or 
things, or saw us meddling with 
doors we shouldn't be near, but no, 
despite taking over the body of an 
enemy commander we apparently 
still have a sign tatooed on our fore- 
heads reading "I am an intruder." I 
really wanted to get into the story- 
line of the Game but I found this a 
very glaring flaw, That and I'm really 
sick of plotlines which rely so heavi- 
ly on Alien. 

The online documentation alludes to 
an upcoming level-building CD. but 
no word on the Vulcan site for a 
release date. Without that product a 
reality. Genetic Speeds remains a 
very impressive standalone Game. 
And, despite the difficulty in compar- 
ing Quake to GS, the comparison 
will ultimately have to be made, and 
it is for this reason that GS scores a 
scant point less than Quake. Quake proper is 
the less engaging Game, but by buying into 
it. you buy into literally hundreds of other 
Games. GS is a thrill ride and a half but when 
it's over, until that level creator comes out 
and people learn its tricks, it's over. ■ 
Jason Compton 



GENETIC SPECIES 



CPU 020 mi* 

Hunker ol disks Crjonlj 

MM _ IMI| 

Hirf int inslillstife „ N:A 



Graphics 
Smifiii . . . 
LtsUkilili 

PUnb.Mr 



OVERALL 



h tremendous effort - a great 
synthesis of adventure, 
suspense, and 3D blasting 



94 



45 



.ame revie: 



Foundation 

■ Price: £29.99 ■ Developer: Paul Burkey/Sadeness Software ■ Available from: Weird Science 
©+44(0)116 246 3800 • www.sarieness.demonxo.uk 

Second in this months pairing of big releases is the long awaited 
Foundation. A game of impressive depth,., but is it engrossing 
enough to pull you in? 





t last Paul Burkey's Magnum 
Opus is with us. Much cited as 
proof that the "bedroom pro- 
grammer" is not an extinct 
species yet. Foundation started 
a couple of years ago as an ambitious pro- 
ject by a shareware author. Drawing inspira- 
tion from God games of all types, with a 
spicy dash of real time war game. 
Foundation has grown into a game of awe- 
some proportions and rich detail. Amazingly 
enough, it has come out at last and thumbed 
Its nose heartily at those fools who believed 
the lad Burkey would never finish his epic. 

Foundation is a "God" game, a genre 
inspired by the seminal Populous by Bullfrog. 
The player controls the development of a 
community from a position of divine power, 
staring down on the isometric world below 
and bestowing destruction or development 
with a few clicks of the mousebutton. The 
genre has developed a lot since the early 
days, greater depth being the current trend 
Foundation certainly follows this trend with 
an enormous range of features: the scope of 
this game developed continuously as the 
game itself was developed, a vicious circle 
which might have lead the game- to grow in 
ever increasing cycles of complexity until it 
became more realistic than the real world 
and took up dozens of CDs, if someone had- 
n't finally yelled "stop!". 

Playing God 

The design of the in-game graphics uses the 
traditional isometric view to display the main 
playing area. This occupies the largest part 
of the screen, It is flanked by the main con 
trol panel and the overview map of the 



island, and a list of all available resources in 
your Headquarters runs along the bottom of 
the screen. You move about the playing area 
by dragging the mouse to the edge of the 
screen in the direction you want or by click- 
ing to a new location on the mini-map. When 
you start, all but the immediate area is in 
darkness. Your surroundings are only 
revealed by exploration. You control a popu- 
lation of peasant workers, magicians, sol- 
diers and scientists, and there is also a 
healthy supply of maidens to er... aid in lever- 
aging the expansion of your population base. 
Building projects require resources to be 
collected. The resources on the surface are 
finite, but can be replenished with a bit of 
magic when you discover the secret. The 
range of buildings is huge, arid grows 
throughout the game as your scientists dis- 
cover more and bring the "tech level" of your 
society up. Of course that is dependent on 
them surviving to a ripe old age and keeping 




A 

It sisrti SO 

?inplf ani 

sereiely... 




them sufficiently comfortable that they can 
spend time in their workshops, tinkering with 
their tools. There are natural resources such 
as ore, gold, coal and wood to manage, 
there's food to gather, and of course ene- 
mies to barney with. 

Game play is continuous and does not 
stop for you to check your statistics or give 
your orders. The men scuttle about the land- 
scape and between the buildings, working 
and carrying, much as they do in The 
Settlers. However individuals and whole 
groups can be selected with the left mouse 
button, and ordered to a different location or 
to occupy a different building with a simple 
click of the right mouse button. The building 
a peasant inhabits indicates the type of role 
he is expected to fulfil in the society you are 
guiding. Typically for Foundation, there's a lit- 
tle more to it than that. 

A big advantage of Foundation over all of 
its predecessors is the added complexity of 



Architects anonymous 




Here's just a small selection of the buildings you can construct 



Foresters Hut: This is 
where your lumberjacks 
go to chop down trees. 






tie: This building pre 
- stone, ore, coal 



ur most widely used 
and steel, 

ewery: You gotta 
ve some kind of 
cial lubricant, right? 



wear high-heels etc. 



toury: Here your 
I can be converted 
i plate-mail cad- 
pieces and all of the 
. ipment necessary to 
make a man into a soldier. 



corpses into magic ai 
saves the neighbour- 
hood from smeling had 

Pump house: I thought 
my men came here to 
engage in the old five- 
knuckle shuffle until I 

destroyed it in a fit of spite and we 

ran out of water. 



46 



IsAMt KlVltW 







J 



^v 





the resource management. As well as priori- 
tising the production and transport of the 
resources, the supply of resources to. and 
output of resources Irorm. each building can 
be adjusted to meet your needs. For exam- 
p!e r if you are short of gold, you can set your 
mine to produce ore only and tell your refin- 
ery to stop producing steel. There is also a 
stock market where goods can be traded in 
cimes gf lack or surplus. Sid Meier's master- 
piece Colonization attempted a similar 
degree of complexity in resource manage- 



1 * ] 












Lm 




: f: 






^P* 














■MP, 













ment. but Foundation manages to be both 
less cumbersome and more detailed. 

Lookin' for trouble? 

The combat system in Foundation is pretty 
straightforward. Fights can easily be started 



by soldier and peasant alike 
by right clicking on your cho- 
sen target. As well as getting 
your soldiers to attack enemy 
buildings, you can even pet 
your peasants to carry out 
sneak raids to steal the fruits 
of your opponent's labour, a 
tactic much favoured by your 
computer foes, 
However the soldiers could 
really do with some tuition on 
intercepting advancing ene- 
mies. You can set a few 
guards around your territory 
ready to intercept invading 
forces, but without a bit of 
steady guidance it can all go 
horribly wrong, and the enemy forces can 
nip off with your gold while your guards 
clumsily chase them in a kind of slow motion 
arthritic keystone cops sequence, 

A nice little bonus concept in Foundation 
is magic, You have wizards who use a 
resource called mana, which you develop by 
burning the corpses of your dead in a 
cemetary. They can use this mana to cast a 
range of spells, which like the tech levels. 
improve and expand with development, 
Mostly, you will use your wizard to build 

buildings - who needs a JCB 
when you've got a bloke in a 
pointy hat and a dresa ; 
By constructing the correct 
combination of buildings, 
keeping a dose eye on your 
resources and ensuring your 
minions are well fed. well 
watered and- happy, you 
should be able to build up 
enough strength to complete 
your mission. You can quickly 
learn to order your mostly 
loyal populace about. 
However it is easy to get the 
balance of buildings wrong, at 
which point your population 
can start to go into a dramatic 
spiral of decline from which it 
is frustrating^ difficult to 
escape. Another thing to watch out for is 
when your people are getting bored and 
depressed ; they start to tamper with the pro- 
duction levels in the buildings. In such 
instances I find that destroying the building 
and all those within it is the most satisfying 



V, 



Rovers, the farm is actually 
ill of your wheat, root vegeta- 
fruits. 

Peasant hut; Build one of these 
and you see why your proud 
populace don't need to resoi 
to the old five-knuckle shuffle 
as all of your maidens rush from 





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Apoittiis 
buck 



< IucMtmI 

property In 1st - 
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ab oratory: Build a laboratory 
our boffins will think up 
.lious labour saving 
vices and new buildings. 

tks: In exchange for a 
,ece of gold, you can train your 
easants to become wizards, 

nteilectuals and soldiers. 



solution, but not to be recommended if you 
are running low on people or resources. 

Control freak! 

The control panel gives you access to a host 
of statistics with which you can monitor the 
progress in the minutest detail. However you 
have to keep an eye on the main playing area 
as potentially important messages can 
appear at the top of the screen at any time. 

A tiny icon by the side of the mini-map 
allows you to zoom to the subject of the 
message in an instant, so you shouldn't miss 
too much, Alas your cause is not helped by 
crammed design, with all the statistical in too 
small a space, With a nice large monitor, the 
icons are quite clear, but a smaller monitor or 
worse a TV can leave them rather fuzzy. The 
inevitable consequence of having so many 
things to control is that you need a lot of but- 
tons, and it would be nice if you could, for 
instance, leave pop up control windows 
scattered around the screen, or have some 
icon submenus that kept the overall icon 
count down. 

Other than that, the presentation of the 
game is very professional and very polished. 
The game can be installed onto your hard 
drive in totality or in pieces, depending on 
the amount of memory you have available. 
Obviously the more you install, the less disk 
accessing will be required during game play, 
and the faster it will run. There are also a 
number of options to select when you acti- 
vate the Found ationPrefs icon before loading 



Feature list 



We started to compile a list of features 
but ran out of room for the review. The 
wealth of clever little features in 
Foundation is amazing: distant sound 
effects, AHI support, mugshots of real 
Amiga users, complete lifecycles for 
peasants, the of alchohol and nice fire 
effects.-, you could go on forever. It is a 
testament to the imagination not only of 
Mr. Burkey himself, but of the hundreds 
of Amiga users on the Internet who 






came up with ideas and suggestions for 
the game Pat yourselves on the hack! 



47 



■ 



GAME REVIEW 




the game, such as screen and graphics 
sizes, and what screen modes to use. 
Foundation runs in AGA or on graphics 
cards, although the hefty chip RAM 
demands really does limit AGA screens to 
the smaller screen modes. It's not that 
there i$ arty problem with the smaller 
screen modes., it's just that playing in 800 
by 600 pixels is nicer. Never mind, you'll 
just have to get yourself a graphics card! 




When you load up the game and sit 
through the opening sequence (nice, but 
too oddly and uncomfortably slow on AGA} 
you get to the main menu screen, which 
sets out the options clearly over an impres- 
sively red sun-set. The lovely rendered 
images of landscapes and seascapes which 
appear on all the menu screens and 
between levels are an attractive feature. 

There are two types of game to choose 
from, the conquest game and the custom 




game. If you choose the conquest game, you 
are faced with the first of the 40 missions 
included on the CD. You start the game with 
a Headquarters, a foresters hut and a pump 
house. From these humble beginnings you 
must build up enough resources to progress 
to the next level, each mission introducing 
more complex targets to achieve and more 
aspects of the game. 

In a custom game you get to create a 
game to suit your mood. You can pit your 
wits with between one and three computer 
opponents, and there are a selection of dif- 
ferent objectives to choose from, such as 
controlling 80% of the island, destroying all 
enemies and torching all enemy buildings. 
Different terrain types can be selected which 
change not just the colour of the graphics, 
but also impact on the game play. For exam- 
ple if you chose to play on a lava island, not 
only are you $urrounded by a fiery sea, but 
the harsh conditions see-m to cause your 
people to suffer serious health problems, 

Animation? 

The lovely polish of the front end is not 
entirely carried through to the game. The 
landscape is excellent, but some of the unit 
detail needs work, The graphics representing 
the buildings look nice, but lack animation to 
illustrate the work going on in the building. 
Not only would this bring more vitality to the 
game but it would most importantly indicate 
when a building has reached the end of its 
useful life, or has become 
unoccupied in times ol labour 
shortage. As it stands, you 
have to be careful to check 
the status of your structures 
regularly to catch problems. 
The characters look good in a 
Sensible S of t ware/Meg a-lo- 
mania sort of way but the ani- 
mation is a little stiff and 
could do with work. Overall, 
however, it is a step above 
what we are used to on the 
Amiga for this genre, and it's 
really only the high expecta- 
tions that it trips up on. There 
are some nice touches to the 
game, like the unique identi- 



A 

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neit cDnlcil 
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tstalJl will be 
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Chech out that 

ithtft&i chtfK* 

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looks just like nr 
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Update frenzy! 



One month on from the initial release 
and Paul Burkey has already released 
nine update patches. The first run of th« 
CD has sold out, and the new pressing 
will have all these fixes and more. 
including an improved manual. Features 
which are promised to come in this and 
in later updates planned over the com- 
ing months are: 

■ Better character graphics 

• Faster graphics card support 

■ TCP/IP support for network play 

* More language files 

- Mission expansion packs 

* Landscape editor 

■ Many game play tweaks 

• Split screen mode {yes!) 

» Whatever else people suggest! 

ties of individual peasants, each having a 
"tasteful' photo and name to aid abuse hurt- 
ing, and the way the ghosts of dead peas- 
ants rise to the top of the screen. 

The in-game sounds are good - simple, 
un excessive, amusing and not too irritating. 
There are some nice touches such as when 
your minions respond verbally to your com 
mands. and you can load your own sample- 
for further Worms - like fun. There's even a 
few new agey CD audio tracks to keep your 
ears from getting bored - a bit wallpaperish. I 
but well suited to the ta$k and well done. 

The biggest flaw in this mainly excellent 
game is the manual. It has a nicely present- 
ed HTML guide, but rather lacking in detail. 
Ideally, there ought to be a comprehensive 
manual detailing all the buildings and units 
precisely, listing what is needed to construct 
them and what they can produce. An online 
guide along the lines Of the Civilopedia in 
Civilization would have been a welcome 
bonus, but as it is, the game can be a little 
hard to get into. 

It can be challenging to get into this 
game, but even early on it is evident that this 
epic creation has enough potential to keep 
you interested for many a long hour. 
Complex, intriguing and ultimately satisfying, 
the sheer depth and involvement of this 
game outweighed the rough edges and 
forced through to a screenstar Payability 
suffers a lot because of the limited 
instructions and cluttered controls, but if the 
updates cover the issues raised. Foundation 
could ultimately earn several more points. ■ 
Andrew Korn & Jonathan Brooker 



FOUNDATION 



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I Hunker d disks CD ««l 

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Gravies... 

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listaiiirlT. 
Playabilil,.. 



OVERALL 

Superstar despite the flaws - 
and it's still gelling better. 



in 

15*, 

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un of the 

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Features 

this and 



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" Tips 
Central 

A few more lost souls are rescued from the deep, dark pit of 




despair by our resident adventure guru Sjur Mathisen. 






Sixth Sense 
Investigations 

' iong ago I bought Sixth 
Sense Investigations, It didn't let 
me down, but either it's harder 
than earlier adventures, or 
maybe I'm letting myself down. 

I had no problem with 
Monkey Island and the other 
greats, but now I'm stuck! How 
do I get the big cheese off the 
man in the cheese factory? How 
can I get the thing on the trucks 
forklift in the toy factory? And 
how do I catch the mouse in my 
office? 

Gene Reeves, Essex 

In this game as in every adven- 
ture game you have to explore 
every inch of the screen with 
your pointer to find all the 
objects. I had problems finding 
a couple myself so I know how 
you feel- To get rid of the 
cheese open the cupboard 
door closest to you in the 
cheese factory and grab the 
metal bar 

Then just sharpen it using 
the stones on the table in the 
other end of the room, and 
chop away The forklift truck in 
the toy factory needs power to 
work. Next to the car you 
should buy at the garage 
there's a car battery. It's a bit 
dirty so try finding a towel you 
can use to wipe it clean. Then 
grab it and insert it into the 
engine on the back of the fork- 
lift truck. 

Finally, to catch the mouse 
you need some cheese 
crumbs; you should look in 
one of the buildings. Guess 
which. Then you just need the 
2 items you'll find In the cup- 
board in your office. Happy 
hunting! 

Sixth Sense 
Investigations 



the armour on Ben. Please help! 

Michael Turner, Ross on Wye 

Congratulations on making it 
past where the previous guy 
was stuck first of all. Now the 
answer of your problems. You 
have to buy the empty bucket in 
the pawn shop. Fill it with oil 
from the device next to the tele- 
porter and the robot guard. 
Then swap the bucket with the 
bottle of oil in the bar {the guy 
at the table is too drunk to 
notices- 
Give the oil to the "oilaholic" 
outside and he'll give you a 
map. Next give the cabdrivera 




In Sixth Sense Investigations I 
can't find anyone that can put 



zwatch watch and he'll take you 
anywhere whenever you hand 
him the map. Ask him to take 
you to the doctor and you'll get 
all the help you need. 

Simon the Sorcerer 

In Simon the Sorcerer I can't get 
the beer barrel in the pub, but I 
read somewhere I need, it so 
please help rne. I was told it had 
something to do with the beehive, 
but can't figure out what? 

Ben Aitken, Hastings 

Deja Vu! 

I got both these questions from 



someone the first month I did 
this helpline, but that's 9 issues 
ago so I guess I can repeat 
it just for you. 

Those two things are con- 
nected, Vou need to use the wax 
from the beehive on the barrel 
to plug it. Then the barman will 
think it's empty and carry it out- 
side. 

Mow, how to get the wax. 
You should head for the castle, 
Use the dapper, you might have 
found at the blacksmith's, with 
the bell and a long piece of hair 
will fall down. Climb up and into 
the window, Talk to the girl, and 
kiss her. Whoops! Take the 
repulser back to the chocolate 
truffle 
house and 
let the "it" 
have a lit- 
tle taste of 
the door. 
Once 
inside, 
take the 
hat and 
the 

smokebox. 
Use the 
smokebox 
on the 
beehive 
and there 
you go. 
Back 
where we started, in the bar, ask 
for 3 drink to keep the barman 
occupied while you do your 
magic. 

This worked 9 months ago, 
so I guess that it still does. 

Flight of the 
Amazon Queen 

I've been stuck on the Flight of 
the Amazon Queen for quite a 
while now as I can't find the ingre- 
dients for the rash cure. 
Please help. 

Sandy Walker. Sutherland 

Tons of stuff has to be done 



before you get your hands on 
it. My guess is that you 
already have gotten the 
Vacuum cleaner from Bob, so 
we'll start off standing next to 
Bud, Talk to the guy next to 
him until he gives you the 
comic. Go back to crash site 
and give the comic to Sparky. 

Go back to Bud- Then take 
the right path, and then turn 
east. Talk to the gorilla and 
tell him he doesn't exist. Go 
South and talk to Marry-Lou. 
Ask for the dictionary and 
swap it for the file. Talk to the 
others about sloths, Use your 
sharp knife on the banana. 
Then give to the monkey with 
the Coco- nut. Go north and 
through the hollow log. North 
again and use the Vacuum 
cleaner on the nice little 
wasps. Pick up the flower 
before you go east. Use the 
button- Talk to the guy with 
the puppets. Tell him you like 
the puppet with the stick. 
Apologise to Fa ye, Go West 
and to the pinnacle, Head for 
trader Bob's and talk to the 
chief. Enter the store and give 
the flower to trader Bob. Get 
the net before you once again 
return to the crash site. Use 
the net to grab the perfume. 
Back to trader Bob's where 
you give the perfume to 
Naomi. 

Now it's of to Floda Camp 
to pick another flower. Go 
back into Jungle and north- 
Use the flower and then the 
scissors on the Sloth. Go to 
trader Bob's and talk to the 
witch doctor about the Rash 
Cure. Use the knife on your 
coco- nut. Then hand over the 
3 ingredients to the witch 
doctor. They are: the coco- 
nut, the sloth hair, and the 
vacuum cleaner. 

Now you can make Bud 
happy, and hopefully I've 
made you happy. ■ 
Sjur Mathisen 



r 



CENTRA, 



Quake 

ecial 





Quake has more built-in cheats 
than any other game ever! Try 
out this little lot then... 




luake is absolutely 
crammed full of cheat 
codes left over from the 
original test mode. To 
activate these, simply go 
I into the console mode 
while playing a level (by pressing the 
~— " key), type in as many of the 
cheats as you want to use and 
return to the game: 

GOD - Unlimited power 
IMPULSE 9 Gives you all the 
weapons, even the thunderbolt 
which can't be found anywhere in 
else in the game. 



IMPULSE 255 
damage. 



Gives ygu quad 



IMPULSE 1 1 - Gives you a Rune. 
You must exit and go back in the 
console each time you use it. 

MAPEtM? You guessed it. this 
takes you to that map. Replace the ? 
with a value between 1-8. 



NOCLIP 
walls, 



No clipping, pass through 



FLY - Fly around using the "d~ and 



"c" keys to move straight up or 
down. 

NOTARGET - Monsters won't attack 
you unless you bug them. 

R_FULLBRIGHT 1 - Suck the shad- 
ows right out of the game. An inter- 
esting code. 

NOTARGET - Makes it so the enemy 
can't see you, use with code below. 

R_DRAWVIEWW0DEL - Makes 
you invisible. 

GIVE - Very useful, can have many 
parameters. For example for shells 
type "GIVE" then the line below 
"Give S#". Make sure you Input a 
value for the #. 

GIVE # - Gives you weapon #. 

S # - Gives you # Shells. 

N # - Gives you # Nails. 

R # - Gives you # Rockets. 

C # - Gives you # Cells. 

H # - Gives you Health #, 

The grappling hook 

On the team play levels there is usu- 
ally something called a grappling 
hook that you can use to scale walls 







*** 





and go just about anywhere. To get 
this hook, go to the console and 
type "impulse 22", then press Enter. 
When you exit the console you 
should hgve the axe selected. To 
use this hook you just hold down 
the CTRL key and you'll fire off a 
purple blob tthe hook} then you'll be 
pulled across to the wall, ceiling or 
floor that the hook hit. 

Level status 

If you're wondering how you're 
doing on a particular level, you can 
hit the Tab key and you'll be told 
how many secrets you've found, 



to a Nightmare skill teleporter. No 
matter what weapon you're carrying, 
you can increase your ammo to no 
known limit by continuing to pick up 
that weapon whenever you see it- 
Note. This works only with the 




how many monsters you've killed, 
and other useful info about your 
progress. 

The nightmare level 

If you've beaten Quake on all the 
difficulty levels, you might want to 
try the Nightmare difficulty level, 
which can't be found via conven- 
tional measures. To get there, pick 
any Skill Hall, and on the 
Introduction level, go up the stairs 
leading to the fourth episode, The 
Elder Worlds. Notice that it says, 
"Your worst nightmares come true 
here"? Walk into the water, but not 
too fast. While you slowly sink, 
move all the way backward as far 
as you can, and when you pop out 
of the water again. You'll land on a 
wooden beam, Walk to your left 
where you'll find a passage leading 



actual weapons themselves, not the 
ammo boxes which will max out as 
normal if picked up. 

The death match 

Playing the death match is a totally 
different tactical challenge com- 
pared to the single player game. 
These tips should help you cope, 
especially if you've found your way 
onto one of the multitude of Quake 
Servers connected to the Net: 

No skins 

Getting tired of all those campers 
hiding in the shadow's with their all 
black skins? Well you can out smart 
them by using the "no skins" option 
in your GameSpy options. To you 
they will appear in base skins, but 
to them, you will appear in whatever 
skin you have selected. 



SO 



TIPS CENTRAL 



Sniping 






■ the keypad 'open bracket' key 
to zoom in and out on targets. This 
s especially good for sniping, 

Suicide 

With the Thunderbolt, wait until 
there is more than one enemy in the 
water, Quickly jump into the water 
and discharge the Thunderbolt. 
Everyone will instantly die. As long 
as there is more than one enemy in 
the water, you will get at least one 
positive frag, 




Charging 

Use charging as a last resort. When 
out of ammo and facing an oppo- 
nent with a Rocket Launcher, charge 
him in hope than when he discharges 
a rocket you will be close enough that 
the blast will kill him too. He won't 
get a frag if he dies too! 

Strafing 

Very hard to master, but something 
all pro's do. Never stay still when 
facing your opponent. Always move 
around and try to strafe side to side 
or around him. Dodge and circle. If 
you strafe enough your enemy can 
lose sight of you and you can kill 
him by shooting him in the hack or 
side. Also useful for dodging 
incoming projectiles. 

Camping 

Use dark corners to hide and 
surprise your enemy. Make 
sure you have a weapon that 
will kil! with one shot, such 
as the Rocket Launcher. 
Don't stay in one spot too 
long but move from shadow 
to shadow. 

The mouse 

Most great players use the 
mouse. It is difficult at first, 
but you'll learn in time. It lets 
you to turn", strafe, and man- 



oeuvre much 
faster than the 
keyboard alone. 

Mouse 
aiming 

Turn on your 
crosshairs using 
the "crosshair 1" 
command in the 
console. Very 
effective for bet- 
ter aiming in 
heavy battles and 
sniping from long 
distances. 

Armour 

Don't underesti- 
mate the impor- 
tance of armour. 
With the right 
armour and a full 
stock of health, you tan take four 
rockets and keep on fragging. 




Knowledge 



Learn the maps. Know where all the 
weapons, health, ammo and power- 
ups are. Follow a pattern that will 
provide you access to ammo and 
health. Never be caught Outgunned. 
The average life span is 5-7 frags. 
Doing the following will surely raise 
your life span. 

Run 

If you are outgunned or out 
matched, don't be embarrassed to "' 



leg it and get the hell out, 

Corner attack 

When being chased try to take the 
nearest cor- 
ner, Once 

you have 
passed the 
comer, do 

an immedi- 
ate 360 and 
start pump- 
ing some 
grenades 
from which 
you came. 





Watch the guy chasing you run right 
into your trap. Try not to fall into this 
trap yourself. When you are chasing 
someone and they turn a comer, 
don't follow I 

Anticipate 

Fire a Rocket before entering a 
room. Shoot into dark corners 
before getting close to them. Fire 

before and after turning corners. 
Shoot into the water where you see 
hubbles:doing (his you may get a 



kill 2 out of every 10 times. 

Jumping 

When being fired upon, jump 

around while trying to 
dodge your opponent. 
This makes it hard for 
them to get a dear 
shot at you. It also 
makes your enemy 
use lots of ammo and 
annoys them too! 

Backward 
attack 

Try doing a 180- 

degree turn and run 
backwards while 
being chased. As you 
are running back- 
wards away from your 
enemy fire with all 

you got. Be careful of Lava and 

other traps. 

1 80 degree turn 

With a key defined to perform an 
immediate 180-degree turn, the pos- 
sibilities are endless. The most use- 
ful reasons to do a 180 turn are: if 
someone is shooting you in the 
back, you can turn around quickJy; 
or when you just need to make a 
dramatic course change. Practice 
performing the turn and see how it 
benefits your play most. Setting up 
the 180-degree turn is a bit com- 
plex. Enter the following: 

bind "?" "turn" 
alias turn "cl_yawspeed 
1 000 ; + ri ght ; wa it; wait ; wait ; - 
right;cl yawspeed 180" 

Substitute the ? for a free letter key 
on your keyboard. ■ 
Chris Green 



51 



2260 diai 




















m 







The World Foundry had the idea, hut what about 
the detail? There Are a lot of decisions to be made 
and a lot of information needed to produce such an 
in depth game... 



liscussion of the game pro- 
gressed and the features list 
grew in size and complexity, so 

did the minimum specification. 
It became dear that even 
uld struggle with many of the fea- 
tures we wanted, but the announcement by 
phase S that they would be producing 
PowerPC accelerators offered a route which 
would allow even the most complex fea- 
tures to be implemented. Vulcan took the 
very brave step of supporting our decision 
to move development of Explorer to PPC as 
a priority, despite the fact that PPC had not 
built up much market presence at the time. 
Unfortunately our path to PPG was for a 
long time complicated by the acrimonious 
squabble between phase 5 and Haage and 
Partner over their rival software solutions 
which has thankfully been resolved, The 
news from World of Amiga has thrown us 
Once more but, for the present, we are con- 
tinuing development of the PPC version of 
Explorer. We will of course be observing 
developments concerning OS d and 5 and 
the new "Superchip" Amiga, 



lastf loth*} 
Ghof k woim, J 

meier long 
inetid delicacy 
ni.irh Enjiyed bv 
the Kurhnnen 
•ppmmtr! 



Explorer s c 

The other result of our growing ambition for 
the game was that Explorer 2260 would 
have to have a background deeper and 
more realistic than any other game to date, 

While many games are accompanied by 
a hazy or incomplete plot, the concepts 
underlying Explorer 2260 demand a huge 
amount of reference material to create the 
feel of 'being there'. Just as an ongoing TV 
series needs a single reference source far 
all the information the various writers will 
need - normally referred to as a series bihle 
- Explorer 2260, with alt the external devel- 
opers and in depth background material, 
needed a central information resource. For 
us, this resource is the Collins Encyclopedia 
G atactica {named after Ed Collins and noth- 
ing to do with any reference book compa- 
nies), [he main reference document to The 
World Foundry ITWF) galaxy. It is already 
over 4MB in size and still not complete, but 
vou can see the latest version on this 
month's CUCD. 

When Chris began work on Expforer he 
had already decided that this background 




would contain much more than simple race 
descriptions, He reasoned that to present a 
scenario which is a feasible view of the 

future, 3S much of the galaxy as possible 
should be described. For a while this even 
extended to the quantum mechanics of 
Chris' Hyperspace theories! With the ever 
expanding detaii, it soon became apparent 
that more contributors would be needed. 

Chris sent an advertisement to the 
world; the pamiga email mailing list, the 
E22S0 development website, and the E2260 
mailing, list. Using Amiga websites and 
newsgroups limits the possible applicants 
to a certain category: those who love their 
Amigas, love playing games on their 
Amigas and like playing space simulations. 
Five years ago, Explorer would have be* 
impossible but, with the internet, the people 
most interested in and dedicated to the pro- 
jed becarne partrtara Nona ai the usual 
prejudices - race, age, gender, creed, 
ST; TNG or B5 got in the way; only talent 
and commitment were important. In short. 
the effort had become global. 

Cute furry creatur 

Communication can sometimes be a prob- 
lem js many of the external developers 
don't speak English as their first language, 
it's occasionally difficult to get the point 
across, What, for instance, is a 'Cavia?' 

Vaipen (one of the background develop- 
ers) announced recently that an alien race 



has helped develop 

r& heads resembling a 

Cavia'. No one reading 

ihe mall knew what that 

Dutch word meant- His 

description, "A cme little 

/thing people keep 

jts" didn't help much 
-ilher. it took a few days 
of translations to 
Menrschwginchen' and 
outright guessing to dis- 
cover this mysterious and 
monstrous creature he 
was talking about was a... 
guinea pig. 

*\part from the occasional p.. 

iea pigs, working over the internet has 
suited the team perfectly. Chris created a 
''z outline for Bach of the major races: 

Dvaskans, Vaipen, Korhonen, 

ensen, Elariens, and Tartans (humans). 

i thnre, the background writers took 

. They have created physiologies, 
homeworlds, social structures, religions, 

special dispositions. There are also 
.j a dozen minof races - creatures from 
aquatic, dolphin people to huge oranges 
with tentacies. Once these descriptions are 

lied, they are sent to Ed for approval. 

! e then decides which races go onto t hi 
ncyclopedia. and which need more work. 

■fui tabs must be kept on the details 

- only one race can have the aides' 

en language, the best genetic implants, 
and an intolerance for F'hoodla beans. 
Likewise, alt the right species must havt 
conflicts and peace treaties. 

Miens need to be drawn, so the writr 
.-wwhat thev look like. Also, the 3D 
artists aren't the only ones who conccpl 
alise spaceships ■ favourites always seem 
to be those the external developers submit. 
So rough sketches are sent to either Ed or 
Rob, and the work begins. The ship or alien 
is modelled, and either sent back to the 
original artist or the rest of TWF for criti- 
cism. The ability to send scanned images 
back and forth to people makes collabora- 
tion a snap. Responses 
are often Hie same day. 
The World Foundry send 
each other at least a 
dozen mails a day regard- 
ing imayes, programs, 
and beta testing. 

Does all this sound a 
little over the top to you? 
Not to us! The heart of 
Explorer 2260 will be a 
dynamic, ever changing 
universe. We want the 
player to live the game, 
not just play it. Unlike 
Elite, the universe around 
the player is ever chang- 
ing - one day you might 
return to your favourite 
planet only to find it has 

A famous Magcnsen b?aii|y... in 9 
verse this tiirj. >l takes all sorts! 



Email confusion! 



Like 1 
1 , the Da] 

a lit 

le to see 



go down well with the new owners! 
The World Foundry 



is a bit shor l 
- 1 Thru, 
proportional as with huma 
Ff. Make them more triang 
- you know what 3 



king 
ke bits extending from 
the Dah' Screws were up on th 

me what you 

rant la beings. But there 
1 shaped. 

teres ting 

:ik3 like a 



1 -id hedge- 



t man. Wit! 




The external developers 



During the development of the ba 
ground a number of people have 1 
tributed text files, graphics and id 
Chris Korhonen 



tijn Sanders 



iaue Crawford 
Andrew Scorgie 
Andreas Thorn 
Steven Wojciechowski 
Fred Ovaska 

Many thanks to all of them for the ■■ 



have done. 



a h\M rust ni But 

where a humans he. 1 ! 

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53 






We follow the musical them© with 
reviews of a couple of major new 
audio releases, Soundprobe 2 and 
Samplitude Opus. For the less audio 
inclined there are cameras, scan dou- 
bters and oddments - not to mention 
the cut-price Siamese VZ.1 





Sound 
Probe 2.0 

On its original release it was the best thing t« 
happen to Amiga audio in ages. Now here's 
version 2 and it's even better. 




t's track, and it '5 got more 
tricks up its sleeve than ever 
before, Sound Probe originally 
racked up a 90% score in the 
Jan 98 issue of CU Amiga. 
Since then it's been improved and expanded 
to include an exciting arsenal of special 
effects and new features. 

If you missed the original review, go and 
dig it out or get it from our back issues 
department. For now though 1*11 fill you in on 
the general picture. Sound Probe is a sam- 
pling and sample editing package designed 
to work with as many different hardware 
configurations as possible. To that end it has 
support for sound cards via AH I, direct sup- 
port for Aura, Aura 8. Clarity 16, 
Megalosound, Megamix Master and generic 
parallel and PCMCIA samplers. It also goes 
out of its way to import and export as many 
audio file formats as possible, including 
8SVX, AIFC. AIFF, AVR, IFF16, StudiotS, WAV 
and RAW. 

Once you've got your sounds sampled or 
loaded the fun can begin. Pick an effect. Any 
effect. Anything from the most obvious day 
to day process to the most abstract, It's 
almost certain you'll be able to do it with 
Sound Probe. Reverbs... yeah, hundreds of 
them, Flangers and phasers... an unlimited 
amount of variations. Then you've got your 
more exotic options, like the still to be 
improved vocoder (as used on ihe.vocal in 



tm PD POST 
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same more software 
through the Royal " 



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H USER GROUPS 



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user 5 roups across Ihl globe. 




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Ellects list or sicked from the virions meius. 



Air's "Kelly Watch the Stars"), the resonant 
filter for extreme filter effects, the pitch 
bending time stretcher... Then there are the 
useful 'professional' type processes such as 
the vocal fader (which tries to remove vocals I 
from a stereo sample), the compressor for 
evening out sound levels and the 1 28 hand 
graphic equaliser. 

Add to those the string of enhancement 
processes, such as decrackle. brighten, bass 
boost and so on, and you've got a lot of 
power at your disposal. 

Sample this 

For sample-based musicians. Sound Probe is 
a godsend. For example, while the Amiga's 
most all-round powerful tracker, OctaMED 
SoundStudio, has quite a few effects avail- 
able during playback, these tend to be quite 
basic due to the computing power required 
to generate things like reverb, filtering and 
so on. That needn't be a limitation now, 
because you can prepare all your samples 
from within Sound Probe before sequencing 
them in SoundStudio. With Sound Probe and 
SoundStudio it's quite possible to produce 
top quality 16-bil traces with as many 
sounds and effects as you deem necessary. 
What you have is the equivalent of an entire 
studio full of black boxes with flashing lights 
crammed into your Amiga, even if it doesn't 
all work in realtime. 

That said, many of the eflects will work in 
realtime. The maximum out- 
put quality of the realtime 
effects varies depending on 
the complexity of Ihe process 
and the CPU power you have 
available. You can also set a 
number of sliders and switch- 
es to define how coarse of 
fine the processing is 
(whether you use filtering for 
example) which reduces the 
CPU load and therefore 
allows for higher output fre- 
quencies. In some cases this 
can make the difference 
between having enough power 
to perform the realtime process- 
ing or not at all. These options also come in 



PRODUCT TEST 





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handy for reducing waiting times- when working 
with larger samples. 

Get lost 

As with the previous release, it's quite easy 
to get lost in the program. There are count- 
less options available at every turn, and 
while some areas have been reorganised to 
aid navigation, you still get the impression 
that things could be presented in a more 
easily digestible manner. For example, you 
might have to open three or four similarly 
entitled option windows before you find the 
one that includes the switch you need to 
flick: Sampling, Audio, Audio I/O Control, 
Project Info, Status, Hardware Settings, 
Audio Options, Sampler Options, Project 
Options.,, which do you pick, when you want 
to alter Lhe sampling device? It's undoubted- 
ly preferable to have more options than less 
It his isn't a Mac application after all} but at 
times it does become a victim of its own 
configurability. 

Even so, it's odds on that once you've got 
things set up for your system you're not like- 
ly to need to change them, and who knows, 
in your search for that elusive button you 
might bump into a few features you never 
would have discovered. 

Sound Probe uses a freeform system of 
windows for everything. The only permanent 
fixtures are the pulldown menus. Due to the 
size of a lot of the windows things can get 
quite cramped unless you have a large 
screen size. You'll notice that the cover disk 
demo stairts up on your Workbench to 
ensure compatibility with your system. 
However, a Productivity or graphics card 
scrccnmode is recommended if you can 
stretch to it, or a flicker-fixed interlace 
screen, Otherwise you'll find yourself can- 



Trie multi-coloured 3D FFT displays 
are now a lot more useful than in the 
original release. Whereas before they 
offered an interesting insight into 
the various frequencies contained in 
your sounds, they now have more 
detailed frequency markings on the Z 
axis. In conjunction with the multi- 
band graphic equaliser and the vari- 
ous filters, it's now a lot easier to 
pinpoint and boost or cut specific fre- 
quencies within your samples, 




There have been lots of additions, 
updates, fixes and improvements 
made around the system. Here are 
some of the more prominent new- 
comers: 

♦ ARexx controllable 

♦ 128 band graphic EQ 

♦ Resonant filter 

♦ New AH I sampler 

♦ Vocoder 

♦ Better frequency display on 
graphs 

♦ Faster FFT routines 

♦ Vocal fader 



stantly resizing windows and clicking the 
frunt-to-hack gadgets as you work, which 
can be a pain. 

Automated ARexx 

One of the most potentially powerful new 
additions to this version is the ARexx sup- 
port. This alfiows you to set up scripts to 
automatically import, process and export 
files a particularly appealing feature if you 
ever have large numbers of sound files that 
need collating, convening or enhancing. For 
example, if you were putting together a col- 
lection of sound samples to be released on 
CD for public consumption, you could get 
Sound Probe to load them all in one by one, 
maximise their volumes for consistency and 
then have them saved out in the required file 
format. If you had a load of sounds lifted 
from old vinyl records, you could add a 
Decrackle process in there too, and maybe 
Bass Boost and Brighten them if they were 
from a tightly packed LR 

Overall this is a more than worthy update 
to an already excellent bit of software. If 
you're interested in making your sounds that 
bit better than the rest then this is an essen- 
tial purchase, While Samplitude over the 
page offers its own individual angle on the 
sample editing theme, Sound Probe has just 
too much on offer to be ignored_B 
Tony Morgan 



SOUND PROBE 2.0 



System requirements: GR020 or higher. 
Workbench 3, 4MB RAM. hard drive 



Generally Med) bit Ihere slill need; in be more trier ii the 
tonfeeti lit widows lid ejtions 



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most things yno nan do with anything its*. 



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feature hoi I haven'i worted it not Eiacih. 



OVERALL 

An essential piece of software 
for anyone into sampling 



%jmL 



55 






PRODUCT TEST 



Samplitude 

Opus 



■ See cover disk instruction pages 
for price and availability details 




ike Sound Probe reviewed on 
the previous pages. 
Samplitude Opus is a sam- 
pling and sample editing sys- 
BB tem. Unlike Sound Probe it 
doesn't go all out to emulate every effects 
unit in the universe but instead sets its 
sights on offering an environment in which 
sound quality and professional features are 
foremost. 

The last time we looked at Samplitude 
was way back in about 1993 when I first 
tinkered with it in conjunction with a 
Maestro sound card. Having since had a 
Toccata card permanently installed in my 
A4Q0Q I've been using that same version 
for the past five years for simple sampling 
jobs. That's about all that old version is 
capable of, but these days development of 
the software has been taken over by ACT 
(Albrecht Computer Technikt and it's got 
rather a lot more to offer. 

Card compatibility 

Samplitude can work with a range of sound 
cards including Toccata. Prelude, Maestro 
and the Amiga's internal sound chip. If you 
don't have a sound card you can also sam- 
ple via the parallel port in B-bits. although 
to be honest if you limit yourself to 8-bit s 
you're never going to push Samplitude 
Opus to its full potential. 

The focus here is squarely on hard drive 
recording. While Sound Probe can record to 
hard drive and edit bard drive files, with 
Samplitude hard drive recording is the core 
around which everything else fits. The user 



You've got a working version of it 
on this month's cover disks. Let's 
take a look at what extras the 
professional option offers. 

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in mind is someone who has a well stocked 
Amiga (Zorro sound card, plenty of RAM, 
68Q60, very fast SCSI drives, CD-R..,) who 
wants to generate high quality soundtracks 
for multimedia projects or master commer- 
cial quality CD music. This isn't supposed to 
be a tool to complement the average trader 
musician or the occasional sampler dabbler 
even though it's got enough under its belt to 
cater for most of those too. 

A typical session with Samplitude Opus 
would see a number of sections of audio 
being sampled direct to hard drive in 16-bit, 
arranged using the Virtual Project manager (a 
kind of big audio clipboard), mixed and 



played in realtime during editing of sound 
levels, filtering and other effects processing, 
then bounced down to a single stereo 16-bit 
audio track on hard drive. That could then be 
replayed live from the drive or cut onto CD 
(with the help of CO burning software!. 

As you can see from the cover disk edi- 
tion, there are specific CD creation features 
included, such as direct importing of raw 
CDDA data (though not directly from audio 
CDs), exporting of the same, and also the 
ability to save out a version of the AIFF sam- 
ple standard that includes imbedded track 
markers. 

Samplitude Opus is mostly concerned 



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with producing clean results, which is 
Teflected in the effects it has to offer. 

There are nowhere near as many as in 
Sound Probe, but ACT promise that they are 
as accurate and free of distortion as is 
possible. Along with the basics like cut, 
paste, reverse and normalise (although 
strangely enough no apparent Undo),, you 
will find an echo and reverb option with 
variable settings, 

To be honest they're hgrrjty the ape* of 
delay effects but they do the job well 
enough. There's also a compressor which 
can be adjusted so as to even out the vol- 
ume levels of different parts of your sam- 
ples fie; to keep vocals or live instruments at 
9 regular level) and a fixed parameter 



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Hard drivin' 

To get the most fromSamplitude's 
professional hard drive editing fea- 
tures you'll need to get your Amiga 
properly kitted out for the job. 
Working with relatively small hard 
drive samples of around a minute or 
two in length won't overly tax the 
average system, but if you want to 
work with an entire chunk of CD 
audio (70 minutes or morel you'll 
need a very fast SCSI interface and a 
large fast hard drive. You'll need at 
least twice as much hard drive 
Capacity as the amount of data you 
intend to work on. A minimum for a 
full CD's worth then is a 2Gb drive, 
It's also essential that your drive 
is formatted and partitioned for opti- 
mum performance with enormous 
files. Make sure the block size is set 
to at least 16K. With a smaller block 
size and anything but the best In 
SCSI controllers you could find your- 
self going insane as you wait what 
seems an eternity for selected sec- 
tions to be located and played from 
the hard drive. Then you've got the 
business of cutting, pasting and pro- 
cessing to contend with. One day 
soon we'll be able to afford to have 
2Gb of RAM on our desktops, I look 
forward to that day... 



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Denotse function {it doesn't offer any 
options). One of the mo$t powerful process- 
es is the EG section. This offers a 2D graph 
for overall frequency response and also a 30 
FFT display, Using these as a guide to the 
frequencies in your sample, you can then 
select three frequencies to be cut or boosted 
by your chosen amount, then see the effect 
it has on the FFT, and of course your sample. 

The most interesting feature here is the 
Convolution effect. It's not explained well in 
the documentation, but it seems to map cer- 
tain characteristics of one sound (from the 
copy buffer} onto another (the currently 
selected sample!. In most cases it sounds as 
if reverb reflections from the copy buffer are 
mixed with the main sample, although in 
other cases the two seem to be melded 
together in a more subtle fashion. 
Unfortunately the output level of this effect 
seems to rise from start to finish, making it 
difficult to keep the volume of the resulting 
sample under control. 

Take your pick 

It's a case of horses for courses whether 
you're going to find Samplitude or Sound 
Probe more to your liking. Fortunately for 
each other they're not both going for the 
same ground, If hard drive recording and 




t:i | <S^ jrhg| €^ |hll| t 






Recording direct In bird drive is nude easier with the lent! 
irntrrs iid iidettndedl lift atid right jjeii coHtf ols. 

editing is a major requirement of the jobs 
you've got planned then Samplitude Opus is 
definitely the favourite. With its multitrack 
mixing and virtual project system it will make 
your life much easier and given the right 
hardware is up to the most demanding of 
audio production jobs. ■ 
Tony Morgan 



SAMPLITUDE OPUS 



System requirements: 68030 (including 
FPU), 2MB RAM, US 3,0 + 



TlHfi'l not mitti In gn was} Here jtthiagb ike Kttsmtl 
big lets in toe way of things 



Good will* large hard drill pro|BCIs 111" *Wt Ht I HrMll 
with Inure*, those present we impwlurt vd wmk mi 



Pi,ced foi lk« pmfessiwul mirtel Iwl 
ciwiiiri*] nrtel's o# eflei 



OVERALL 

The best hard drive recording 

and editing system available 



86 



57 



PRODUCT TEST 



Eyetech CDPIus SE 



■ Price: from £99.95 ■ Supplier: Eyetech I +44 (0)1642713185 

■ Web: http://www.eyetech.co.uk 

For Amiga 1 200 owners who have not yet 
joined the CD-ROM revolution, here is the 
fast and cheap Eyetech CDPIus. 



If you still have not got a CD-ROM drive 
attached to your Amiga, then now is a 
good time to buy one. various compa- 
nies are shipping complete CD solu- 
tions for the A1200 at under £100. 
Eyetech, purveyors of all things IDE for the 
Amiga, are joining in on this pricing war with 
their CDPIus SE systems. They offer a 20s 
speed CD-ROM drive for £99.95 and a 32x 
speed one for only £20 pounds extra. 

The Package 

The CDPIus SE package consists of the CD 
drive itself and Eyetech's EZCD-SE. the econ- 
omy version of their 4-way buffered IDE 
adapter and driver software. The CD drive 
mechanism is housed in a slim-line metal 
case. It requires and is supplied with an 
external PSU. The standard version of the 
drive is shipped without any audio out con- 
nections, but - as an optional extra - you 
can specify an audio mixer. The is a useful 
and unusual addition for an external drive 
and allows you to mix together the audio 



Not fast enough? 



The point of buying a 20x or 32 x speed 
CD drive, obviously, is for its perfor- 
mance. So how fast are these drives? A 
standard fix) speed CD reads at an 
average rate of 150 Kb/s. So, theoreti- 
cally, a 20x speed should read nt 3.0 
Mb/s and a 32* speed at 4.8 Mb/s, 
right? Wrong. The speed quoted is actu- 
ally a maximum speed and will only 
ever be achieved when, the drive is read- 
ing from the outside edge of a disc. Add 
to that the poorly implemented IDE 
interface that the A 1200 is blessed with 
and things slow down considerably. 
The ATA IDE standard that is 
implemented via the A1200's interface is 
known as PIO (Programmed I/O) Mode 
0. Mode 0, theoretically, has a maximum 
transfer rate of 3,3 Mb/s and is a non- 
DMA standard. This means, that basical- 
ly, the processor is required to perform 
the data transfer. 



output of your Amiga with the CDDA output 
of the drive. Both the drive mechanisms, the 
20x and 32x, are manufactured by Lite-On, 
Inc. and are excellent. Fast CD-ROM drives 
have a tendency to sound like a lawn-mower, 
but not these; they are whisper quiet. 
The drive is hooked up to your 
machine via the 4-way adapter, This is a 
device which fits to the IDE connector inside 
your A1200 and allows you to use up to four 
IDE drives with your machine. Installation is 
a simple process, helped by the clear 
instructions supplied. This latest revision of 
the 4-way adapter seems more stable than 
previous releases, although it may create 
timing conflicts with some hardware. The dri- 
ver software provided is a registered but 



restricted version of Elaborate Bytes's 
alapi, device (as supplied with the IDE-Fix 
package) and the old. freeware AmiCDRQM 
filing system (the fore-runner of AmiCDF5l. It 
is easy to install, usable, but slow. By 
upgrading to the full version of EZ-1DE soft- 
ware you immediately gain a 30% increase 
m speed and a lot more flexibility. 

The performance 

How do these drives perform in practice? In 
raw transfers tests, when using the full EZ- 
IDE software, both drives achieved speeds 
of about 2.0 Mb/s. (For reference, an Bx drive 
with the same setup gave 1 .2 Mb/sJ 





Although this is not amazingly quick, it is 
quite impressive given the fundamental limi- 
tations present. The fact that the results 
were similar for both drives is because of 
the bottleneck caused by the Al20G's IDE 
interface, In practice the 32x will be faster, 
since it has a better seek time (that is, it can 
locate a required position on the disc more 
quickly). Tests indicated that for tasks like 
reading directories, the 32x speed drive is 
about 20% faster than the 20x one. 

So, these drives are no slouches, but 
don't expect miracles. 

The judgement 

There is no question that the CDPIus sys- 
tem is of high quality, But is it worth the 
money? OK. the extra performance boost 
given by the 32x drive may not be enough 
to justify the extra price, and the full driver 
software and the audio mixer are extra 
costs - so perhaps this is not such a good 
deal as it seems? Regardless, the CDPIus, 
even in its basic form, is highly usable and 
offers an economical way of accessing CD- 
ROMs from your A1200, ■ 
Richard Drummond 



EYETECH CDPLUS SE 



System Requirements: flmij* 12m 



e lew problems. 



Hot htifldiigly last, but fast enough. 



Despite the hidden U*M, still good value 





OVERALL 

There is no excuse not to buy a 
CD-RDM drive now 



90 



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PRODUCT TEST 



VDC200p Digicam 

■ Price: £199.95 ■ Developer: Power Computing ®+44 (0) 1234 851500 * www.powerc.com 

Power Computing follow up their first entry into the Digital Camera arena 
with another budget wonder. 




ike Power 

Computing's first 

offering in the digi- 

tal camera stakes 

(reviewed in the 
June 1998 issue), this camera 
comes from Taiwanese budget 
scanner maker Mustek. Although 
a significantly higher specification 
than the previously reviewed VDC- 
100. the VDC-200P should not be 
thought of as Mustek's assault at 
the high end of the digital camera 
market more a way in to the bot- 
tom end for people who could not 
ive with its feature - free smaller 
brother. 

Structurally the VDC-200P is a 
big improvement over the cheaper Power 
camera, larger and better shaped to fit the 
hand. The camera is simple enough in use, 
too - not as simple as its stable mate, but 
then this camera has a few more functions 
than the ultra basic VDC-100. 

The most obvious new feature is the LCD 
screen at the back. You can monitor the 
image coming through the lens in real time, 
giving you a rather better idea of what to 
expect when you press the "shutter" button. 
The functions ol the camera are also select- 
ed through a menu displayed on the LCD 
screen. While switched to Camera mode, the 
menu allows you to alter the brightness of 
the screen, set the self timer, select high or 
low resolution images, and switch the flash 
on or off. In Playback mode, you can switch 
between a nine picture index view or single 
picture, and you can delete either the current 
picture or clear the entire memory. 

The software supplied with this camera is 
a minor update of the same PowerPC soft- 
ware we looked at with the cheaper camera. 




Dynamics 




Specifications 



Resolution: 470k pixels 

Memory: 2Mb, gives 50 pics at 3ZQ 

by 240 or 20 at 640 by 480 

Viewfinders: Optical with simple frame 

finder, 45mm colour LCD 

Focus: Fixed 

Aperture: fB.O and f2,B 

Outputs: Digital out. Video out, 

CF card slot 






A btilgtt 

CMC Ml 

Miter sart, but 

tilt rtrselulinn 

is iKHt. 



It allows you to fetch 
all the images from 
the camera or down- 
load them singly; the LCD screen allows you 
to preview the images in memory and down- 
load cnly the ones you want. You can save 
the image as a JPEG, an IFF24 or a PNG. You 
can set the serial device and connection 
speed, and can configure your own viewer 
software or use PowerDC's own. As before 
you can use PowerPC to take a photo 
remotely, but with this camera you can also 
set all the camera functions direct from the 
software. Click on the extended camera 
functions button and you can switch resolu- 
tions, control the LCD and flash, 
even switch the camera off. 

PowerDC is admirably func- 
tional and simple, and a lot more 
stable than the crash-prone PC 
software the manufacturers sup- 
ply in the box. The image quality 
is a step up from the cheaper 
camera. I suspect that the CCD 
array is common between the 
two cameras, and the lens no 
great improvement, slill low 
grade and fuzzy. With 2Mb on 
board, however there is less 
compression of the images and it 
shows. 




A Brighton- 
light can wreak 

ba*M mlh Lhu 
inn dynamic 
lanqp r.\ ifce 
Oft. 



Jilt Willi 

carefil light and 
a hi! ul aharpnes s 
aiiei with posl 
practising, quail 
1 r can be very 
decEM. 



The dynamic range is poor, so that bright 
objects against dark backgrounds tend to 
burn to white, and colours are not too stable, 
being balanced well for daylight but faring 
less well with fluorescent or incandescent 
light. The flash helps out in this but it has 
slightly too strong a forward response lead- 
ing to spotlighting and glare. A simple two 
posi:ion waterhouse stop allows you to dose 
down the lens aperture if it gets too bright, 
but dose - up flash or bright sunshine can 
flood out the image or cause weird dis- 
colouration. 
,^^^ The image quality shoutd certainly 
■ be sufficient for small images in a 
99 DTP document or on a web-page 
however • look a! the examples on 
this page and make your own mind 
up. As with the cheaper Power 
Digital camera, this one majors on 
value for money. To get these kinds 
of features you normally have to 
spend rather more money than 
this. Image quality is still rather 
suspect: again not surprising, but 
'^^^^ the price is heading further 
towards the territory where you Start expect 
ing good image quality. If you can stretch 
your budget another 60-70% you could 
afford an Olympus 420L, a much better cam- 
era. On the other hand if you're going to 
have to stretch your budget to afford this 
camera then do it, it is miles better than any- 
thing cheaper. ■ 
Andrew Korn 




VDCZOOp Digicam 



System Requirements: OSZ.IS or belter, 1Mb minimum, 
EBB20 and 2Mb recgmmenitel. 



Ease tmm. t*ij lotlware 



Sthwm n all y»u watrid acsd, iMrgt quality isn't fait*. 



Die ai features it a wtf law cost 



DVERALL 

GdOll package with acceptable 

tint put and a fantastic price. 





PRODUCT TEST 



Siamese V2.1 

■ Price: £29.99 ■ Developer: Siamese Systems ©01525 211558 
• www.siamese.co.uk 

Siamese RTG becomes available at a budget price 
- but it is serial only. 




egular readers of CU Amiga 
will be fairly familiar with our 
positive opinions of the 
Siamese software. The prob- 
lem is that a lot of people 
aren't entirely sure what Siamese would offer 
them - it is a quite unique product in the 
world of computer software, and it is often 
said that without a live demonstration, no- 
one will really see the value of Siamese. 

Siamese V2.1 CD contains a mass of doc- 
umentation on the Siamese system, including 
the entire Siamese web site and several digi- 
tised "introduction to Siamese" video clips. 
There is also the Siamese V2.1 software, 
which is basically the same as the full V2.5 
RTG software except that it will run only over 
a serial link, Installing the software involves a 
simple installation from CD for both the 
Amiga and a PC, The two are connected 
together and the network software config- 
ured on both sides. You will of course need a 
null modem cable - not provided, 

Aptly named, Siamese melds your Amiga 
and your PC together. It is possible (rf confus- 
ing) to control either computer with the 
mouse and keyboard of the other. You can 
transfer files much in the manner of the vari- 
ous PC/Amigia networking solutions and you 
can even share clipboards, so that you can 
cut from a document on your Amiga and 
paste into a document on the PC. or vice- 
versa. The range of functions to be installed 
is set up from a nice straightforward prefs 
program on the Amiga side. 

The most intriguing and powerful Of these 
functions is RTG mode, When [his is activat- 
ed, you will find that your Amiga's screen- 
mode selector contains new SiameseRTG 
screen modes. When a program opens a 
screen in one of these screenmodes, the 
screen is opened up on the PC! The Siamese 



client intercepts the screen drawing com- 
mands, sends them down the serial cable, 
and redraws them under Windows. What this 
means is that you can open your Workbench 
screen, or a PPaint screen, or whatever else 
uses retargets ble screens, on your Windows 
95 or NT desktop. 

How fast? 

As the connection is over serial, the speed at 
which an Amiga screen is drawn on the PC is 
not terribly fast, even if you are running the 
system through a fast serial add-on such as 
the whippet. The way the screen drawing is 
handled is very clever - all the intuition gad- 
gets are recreated on the PC side, meaning 
that only the drawing instructions need to be 
sent: bitmap graphics have to be sent whole, 
and therefore take a lot longer. Opening 
Image FX gn the PC, the screen gadgets 
draw very quickly, while the bitmap preview 
screens are rather slow. When you work with 
multiple small preview windows, the slow- 









Siamese Ethernet 



Siamese V2.1 is in fact a very clever 
advertising gimmick. It is cheap enough 
to be tempting to try, useable enough 
to persuade people that they want it, 
and slow enough to make people think 
seriously about upgrading to Siamese 
Ethernet. With an Ethernet connection 
even bitmaps are drawn pretty fast - 
Siamese over Ethernet is amazing, 
Serial will not normally go ever 
115200 bhVs while Ethernet can drive 
Siamese at up to SOOk bytes a second 
If you have an Ethernet card for your 
Amiga, then the full Ethernet ready 
software wilt set you back £99.95, 
Alternatively you can get it with a 
hydra Ethernet card for A1200 or A4000 
for £199.95. In either case, Siamese sys- 
tems will refund you the full cost of the 
VZ-1 CD, Smart move! 



ure out a blank page. On the other hand 
Pagestream works great, especially if you d 
play bitmaps with outlines. Workbench woi 
very well, a clever little touch replaces the 
backdrop image with one stored and drawr 
locally, so you can have a nice Workbench 
backdrop without that having to travel over 
the serial link, 

There are certainly imperfections with thl 
Siamese software. I found that the option I 
mount PC drives did not work on my comj; 
er - apparently this is because it clashes ] 
the def icons option in Newlcong. Compared! 
to what author Paul Nolan has achieved wit 
the system, these imperfections seem like 
petty problems that you can be sure will pai 
in time. What Siamese does is unique and 
rather brilliant At this price it's not much of l 
risk, and In my opinion, if you have an Amig 
and a PC. you're mad not to even try it out. 
Andrew Korn 



down when any individual update has to be a Siamese lets 
drawn is not a problem, while for an AGA you open multi- 
Amiga owner, the benefits of opening the pie Amiga appli- 
ImageFX screen on a large 24bit PC screen cations on i 
are considerable. lice 24 bit dis- 
The screen redrawing is not 1 00% per- play under a 
feet; small amounts ol corruption occur, nasty operating 
especially with MUI applications, but this is system, 
a very small price to pay and never worse 
than slightly annoying. The bitmap slow- 
down makes something like a PPaint slow, 
but as it works by differential updates, it is 
almost useable. Over Ethernet, it is quite 4 ¥00 cap enen 
fast enough. Wordworth, which updates open 1 
the screen far less intelligently, is unusable. Warkbeach 
Open it on the PC screen and you can screen and an 
watch it blit grey blobs to the screen for a Opus serein 
couple of minutes before it manages to fig- simultaneously. 



System Requirements: Amiga wit* 0S3.0+. PC 

wilt ftirinw; 95, lull modem cattle 



Not lad., bat still < little ptaity, some edd difficulties 
occur 

Very slaw, hut wait it does is Siaaimg 

Super* price, with taon«> back upgrades 



OVERALL 



Best thing Id happen to a PC 



62 



KKUUUll ItSI 



Scan Magic 

■ Price: £54.95 (Internal) £99.95 (Internal with flicker fixer) 

■ Supplier: Power Computing €+44 (0)1234 851500 
• http://www.powerc.com 

For ages Amiga 1 200 users have been crying out for 
scan doublers. Now the market is awash with them. 



A scan doubier is a devrce which 
allows you to connect a high 
quality VGA monitor to your 
Amiga and be able to view the 
native video modes on it. In the 
June issue of CU we reviewed the first such 
devices for the AT 200 to appear on the mar- 
ket, manufactured by Micro nit. Here we look 
at two more from Power Computing, 

Power's Scan Magic comes in two inter- 
nal versions: one with and one without a 

or fixer. Both allow you to display NTSC 
and PAL screens on a VGA monitor, while 
:hc flicker fixing version also gives rock- 
steady interlaced modes as well, 

Plugging them in 

Both versions of Scan Magic consist of a 
small circuit board connected by a piece of 
ribbon cable to a double-sided socket. One 
side of this socket plugs into the RGB port 
of your Amiga, while the other is a standard 
VGA connector into which you connect your 
monitor, This circuit board fits over the Lisa 
chip on the motherboard of the A1200, the 
custom chip responsible for generating the 
AGA video signal. 

Installation of Scan Magic is a similar 
process to that of the Micronik scan doubier, 
although simpler and tidier since it has only 
one board. Unless you have a tower-cased 
1200, though, you have to dismantle your 
machine, removing the keyboard, floppy 
drive and the shield. You are also left with 
the problem of what to do with the cable 
that joins the two halves of the Scan Magic 
together, Obviously, this is a device more 

■:d to a tower system. 



Do they work? 



Once installed both versions of Scan Magic 
works invisibly, giving crisp, steady images 
with the non-laced video modes. The display 
quality is on par with the Micronik devices, 
but a similar flaw occurs: no black borders. 
That is, the black border e fleet produced by 
commodities such as MCP is bypassed by 
both devices. Not an essential flaw, but 
annoying. 

The flicker fixing Scan Magic does a 
creditable job with interlaced modes, too. 
for static images it is perfect. For moving 



images, however, there is a discernable 
flicker. This is a consequence of the way 
interlaced modes and the de-interlacer func- 
tion. A complete display is built up in two 
monitor refreshes. In the first frame only the 
odd rows are produced, whereas the even 
rows are filled in on the second frame (and 
so on, in alternation). On moving the mouse 
pointer, for example, when the second half 
Of the pointer image gets displayed, the 
pointer has moved from where it was when 
first half was displayed; hence, the flicker. 
This effect is tolerable, however. 




A Iht standard 
Sen Mijic 



4 It* Sell Magic 
will! flitktr to* 





Living with AGA 



So you have got yourself a flicker fixer 
and a nice VGA monitor, How do you 
overcome the two main limitations of 
AGA: namely, its poor speed and its lim- 
itation to 2Mb of graphics memory, 

1. Open WB on a Multiscan Productivity 
screen to get a solid 640x480 display. (If 
you have a flicker fixer you may prefer, 
say, PAL laced at 700*500} 

2. Don't make Screens too deep. Lots of 
colours will slow the system down and 
consume memory. If you have a fast 
processor, 64 colours is quite usable, 

3. Use a WB replacement. Workbench's 
allocation of drawing pens is poor 
Replace it with, say, Scalos, to make 
better use of that limited number of 
colours, 

4. Get a copy of F8lit. FBlit is a hack 
which replaces some of the OS blitter 
functions with CPU functions. This has 
the benefit, for fast processors, of 
speeding up blitting operations, It also 
gives you the option of forcing named 
programs to use Fast memory for non- 
displayable bitmaps, thus conserving 
precious Chip RAM. 



Are they worth it? 

Both versions of Scan Magic are excellent, 
the standard version especially 50 because 
of its low price. The flicker-fixing version is 
worth the extra cash if you need de-interlac- 
ing: il does allow you to have large, steady 
screen displays, but you will have to live with 
the update flicker. ■ 
Richard Drummond 



INTERNAL SCAN MAGIC 



System Requirements: hum m4 svgh meni.un 



OVERALL 

A cheap way to get a high qua I- [ f 

ity screen display 



INTERNAL SCAN MAGIC WITH 
FUCKER FIXER 



System Requirements: auck ™* such wh b , 



OVERALL 

The best Amiga display this 
side of a graphics card 



92 



63 



PRODUCT 



Catweasel Mk 

■ Price: £49.00 ■ Developer: Individual Computing ■ Supplier: Golden Image <" 0181 900 9291 

The peripheral that no-one can manage to spell correctly gets a 
whole new incarnation. 




It u$ed to be so simple when the only 
annoying thing about Amiga floppy dri- 
ves was the clicking, But once it 
became clear that the rest of the world 
was using high-density floppies. Amiga 
owners discovered that Paula is incapable of 
handling high-density floppies at full speed s. 
This was a had thing, and has condemned 
us all to a life of expensive solutions for 
accessing HD floppies so important to talk- 
ing with PCs and Macs 

The advent of cheap removable media 
like the Zip has taken some of the sting out 
of this necessity, but it's still handy to have, 

Calling the Clock Port 

Two of the biggest complaints about the 
A1 200's design were the lack of a high-den- 
sity floppy drive and the lack of a battery- 
backed clock. Instead, the computer came 
with a small 22 pin header where third-party 
clock modules could be placed. The 
Catweasel Mk II takes advantage of one 
problem to solve another. 

By now, just about everyone has a clock 
on their accelerator card anyway, so that 
clock port is tantalisingly idle. In order to use 
the Catweasel Mk II on the clock header, you 
need the "correct" header The most com- 
mon is a 22-pin version which sits in the 
middle of the machine, near the keyboard 
connector and (at lea$l on some models) 
under a small, independently removable RF 
shield. Some machines have the header 
closer to the hard drive and it may consist of 
40 pins, or may not exist at all, in which case 
this option isn't available to you. 

Like the original Catweasel, the Mark II 
can also live on the IDE port, but that 
requires a custom cable for A1200s and 
means you're hogging a spot on the IDE bus. 
although there is a passthrough. If you con- 
nect to the IDE bus, you wilt need to power 
the Catweasel by plugging in a supplied 
cable to a hard drive power connector. 




Word of warning 



The Catweasel was incompatible with 
the Apollo A 1200 030/40 accelerator 
board but did work with a Blizzard 060 
Check if your card disables the clock 
header in an A12DD. 



Therefore, the IDE option is not recommend- 
ed for desktop A1200s (heat and space are 
also serious concerns). For towered 1 200s or 
other machines with an IDE bus, the beefier 
power supply should be sufficient. 

The clock header provides sufficient 
power for the Catweasel. The manual states 
that you can use the power connector if nec- 
essary, but I found that plugging it in actually 
caused horrible system instability and made 
the unit extremely hot. The Catweasel 
requires drivers to run, which are installed 
off of a standard Amiga floppy disk (meaning 
you shouldn't throw away your old drive until 
you install the Catweasel software and make 
sure it's functioning!) 

Getting your floppy in 

The primary use of the Catweasel is to 
replace the Amiga floppy with a cheapie PC 
high- density floppy drive. Of the various 
manufacturers out there, the developers 
have tested most, with Teacs coming highly 
recommended, most others offering accept- 
able performance, and MitsumiyNewtronics 
drives singled out for unreliable operation, 
particularly on disk writes. 

You should be able to find a norvMitsumi 
drive for relatively cheap With a little bit of 
work you should be able to get many models 
to live in desktop A12QQ models, and of 
course for other machines they will mount in 
a standard drive bay. The Catweasel treats 
floppies in an odd fashion. Rather than call- 
ing your floppy DFO, the first drive is called 
TDG for double-density (880k) floppies, and 
THO for high-density disks. Reading PC disks 
requires the use of PD0 and PHO, according- 
ly, Aside from being a bit unconventional, it 



A 

The uillv 
KB which 

his a Cits 
tail chip 



also clutters your Workbench with 
"bad disk" icons. In speed teats, the 
Catweasel performed substantially 
quicker on HD floppies than an A4D00 
HD drive (because it can read at full 
speed), but slightly slower on 88QK 
disks. Because the Catweasel requires 
drivers it is not a rjrop-in replacement 
for DFO, although you can run a patch 
to allow the Catweasel to act as a 
bootable drive. Still, hard-coded pro- 
grams seeking DFO or particularly 
nasty copy-protection routines will not 
be happy with your Catweasel drive. 
The Catweasel has some handy 
bonuses. One is the ability to add a 
5.25 inch floppy, which has a very nice 1541 
filesystem (for access to C64 disks) as well 
as the ability, with some extra tinkering, to 
read Amiga, PC, Atari and Apple floppies. 

However, since most PC 5.25" disks can- 
not read the back sides of single-sided 8-bit 
disks properly (due to index-hole issues) you 
may need to make a modification to whatev^ 
er drive you pull off the scrap heap. Also, for 
3.5™ floppies in high-density mode, there is a 
custom format called "XTRA" which allows 
over 2 megabytes on a standard HD floppy 
disk, but since nothing but another 
Catweasel can read it this would primarily be. 
for personal archiving. Because it's not a 
DFO replacement, the Catweasel isn't a per- 
fect option for Amiga owners, but with the 
redesign and the drop in price since last 
year, it's become a very attractive option. ■ 
Jason Compton 



CATWEASEL Mk II 




System Requirements: ai 2nd with zz-pii clock 

header, any Amiga with IDE inter Thi:k 



The tiflMttori™ floppy handling takes seme getting vsti t* 



A solid piece of hardware 



Mich belter than- digging up a reel Angi HD flew 



OVERALL 

The best overall way to improve 
your floppy capabilities 



oU 






Email 
fhite_Knight_Tech 
1C0mpuServe.C0m 



IBCT DAY DELIVERY From Jusl£5.0D 



WE ACCEPT 

Mastercard 

Vrsa. Delta 

and Switch 

2.5% Surcharge on 

Cr&dil canto Nol 

Switch .' Delia 



Prices INCLUDE 17.5% VAT 




■. SCSI 3 is Compatible with SCSI-1 & 2 

- 3Gb IBM (5400rrjn% Narrow) £ 229 

- 3Gb IBM (SdOflrpm, Wide.! £ 243 
*" 5Gb Seagate (7?00. Narrow) £ 259 
4 5Gb Seagate (7200. Wide) £ 31 
*■ 5Gb IBM ES (7200, Narrow) £ 259 
• 5Gb IBM ES (7200, Wide) £ 294 
"^gftsr Capacity SCSJ 1 CWttW Afeo Available 



NOrautfflfate torlntPmal Fitting InAl^ff 

1Gb Seagate ultra dma £ 119 
2.5Gb Seagate uiiray% £ 129 
2Gb Seagate ui^jma £ 135 

4.3Gb FujitSU Lira DMA £ 1 55 
Higher Capacity IDE Drives Also Available 

OROM 

x Speed Toshiba sesi £ 99 
x Speed ATARI / IDE £ 65 
x Speed ATAPl t IDE £ 69 
4 x SCSI-2 CD Writer £ 295 
I 2/2 X SCSI CD ReWriter £ 359 
4 X IDE CD ReWriter £ 275 



'SI Cartridge Drives 

SyJetl.SGbErt.cabie £269 
>yJet 1 .5Gb in, £ 259 

>yJet 1 5Gb cm-m^ (x3) £ 1 59 

ZIP 100MbE«1 *eiM*tT«m£ 135 

ZIP 1 0OMb Um Internal £ 1 35 
ZIP 100Mb Disks (x 6) £ 75 

JAZ 1Gb Gxt. + C*Ib S THrm £ 31 9 
JAZ 1Gb Interna) 3.5" version £ 279 

JAZ Disks (x 3) £ 239 

EZ Flyer 230Mb em - c ar * e £ 1 35 
EZ Flyer 230Mb DiskM«a) £ 57 

Networking 

HYDRA Zorro2 Ethernet £ 1 49 
11200 PCMCIA Ethernet £ 1 1 9 

Memory SIMMS 

8Mb 72 pin 60ns EDO £ 16 
1 6Mb 72 pin 60ns EDO £ 32 
32Mb 72 pin 60ns EDO £ 45 

Monitors 

Hi-Res SVGA £ 309 

5 Hi-Res SVGA £169 

Hi-Res SVGA £139 



ipmwffpc-' 



Blizzard 603e+ 

If you're ihinking 01 buying urn-, 
j,.,.- fihoiildj-i'1 you M* I* the e k perl 6? 

i-or the bestadvicr! aqGasivicfc (Although 
not necessarily ltij> bestpriceg - Alltjr all, 
excellent semflepaesntconi* cheap I ) 



LOLA 2000 svhs & vhs £ 349 
LOLA 1 500 vhs Onij. £ 1 79 




SVHS & VHS 
Ptus Audio & Chroma Kay. 
SolJwara cunirol. £ 599 



NEPTUN As SJrius, bul wilhout 
audio, RGB & Chroma Keyer, £ 449 



A 1200 & A4000 



.Concepts. 



To wer C on version s 

A 4000 (io Beys, 2WW> only £ 159 
Ai2IIO,nB Ll vx2.n.iWj from £129 



AteoBus 



l^wr- but tor AtMG 



rt^ 



AteoBus & I'i\«lfi4 Jusl £ 229 

<!riipllk"ii'iirtl A iliirs Uir Tiiibitl-iI \I2HII\ 



Details 



Cteai 



Software 



AMIBACK 2 - HD Backup £ 20 

AM IGAVISION Authoring £ 15 

MULTIMEDIA EXPERIENCE £ 30 

MONEY MATTERS V4 £ 6 

TURBOCALC 3,5 Spreadsheet £ 20 

TERMITE Communications £ 10 

INFO NEXUS 2 File Manager £ 1 

STUDIO 2 Printer Drivers £ 25 

SURFWARE Internet Starter £ 5 

ORGANISER 2 £ 25 

ADOFtoGE MAGIC Casablanca £ 49 

AMiNET 8 > 9 t 11 CDROM £ 7 

AMOS PD LIBRARY CDROM£ 10 

OCTAMEDS'STUDIQCD £ 12 

SOUNDS TE R P I FIC C D ROM £ 10 

EMC PHASE 2 ! 3 CDROM £ 8 

ANIMATIONS DOUBLE CD £ 10 



Specifications ? 

If you need technical detaits 
on any of our products, call us 
on 01920 822 321 weekdays. 
White Knight Technology 

are renown tor excellent service 

VIVA the AMIGA! 



f Please CaJl Us Io Verily Price & > 

Availability ftefore Posting An Order, 

Goods Are Not S^iJ On a Tna Basis 

Any unwanted or unsutafcle items, il rMumed in 

prialine WTKJIlHJfi are lia'jfc to 3 min. 20% charge 

Minimum Order Value £ SO + P&P 

Many prices subject io exchange rate. 
E & O E - 1 fl 06 98 



White Knight 

Technology 

Tel: 01920 822 321 

9.30 - 5.30 Mori - Fri Fax: 01<>2U 822 302 

P.O. BOX 38, WARE, HERTS, SG11 1TX, U.K. 





LIGHT MY FIRE 




A1200T 



160Mhz no 040/060 g £ 239 

160Mhz with 040/25 & £ 249 

160Mhz with 060/50 t3 £ 499 

200lv1h2 no 040/060 | £ 299 

200Mhz with 040/25 - £ 309 

200Mhz with 060/50 = £ 559 

240Mhz no 040/060 $ £ 359 

240Mhz with 040/25 ■ £ 369 

240Mhz with 060/50 ~ £ 61 9 

160Mhz no 040/060 3. £ 299 

l60Mhz with 040/25 «a £ 309 

160Mhz with 060/50 S £559 

200Mhz no 040/060 £ £ 359 

200Mhz with 040/25 B £ 369 

200Mhz with 060/50 d £ 619 

240Mhz no 040/060 =§ £ 419 

240Mhz with 040.'25 '§} £ 429 

240 Mhz with 060/50 <° £ 679 



180Mhz no 040/060 « £ 549 
180Mhz with 040/25 -g £ 599 
1 80Mhz with 060/50 | £ 819 
200Mhz no 040/060 □ £ 649 
200Mhz with 040/25 o £ 699 
A1 500/2000 200Mhz with 060/50 S £ 919 



Blizzard 603e 
Power Board 



PPC grapl 

B«603«hi 
SCSI . 
Cannot be upgraded. 

Blizzard 603e+ 
Power Board 



A1 200T 




Blizzard 2604e+ 
Power Board 



CYBERSTORM 



A4000/4000T/300073000T* 
With 



180Mhz no 040/060 £ 469 

1 SOMhz with 040/25 £ 509 

180Mhz with 060/50 £729 

200Mhz no 040/060 £ 549 

200Mhz with 040/25 £ 589 

200Mhz with 060/50 £ 809 

233Mhz no 040/060 £ 599 

233Mhz with 040/25 £ 639 

233Mhz with 060/50 £ 859 




V#£ 



CyberVision PPC 



BlizzardVision 



and BVision PPC 

High Performance Graphics 
for all Phase 5 PPC boards 



060 Accelerator 



CyberVision PPC (8Mb) E 189 
BVision PPC (4Mb) £ 155 

A4000/4000T 
A3000*/3000r 

with 060 t 499 
wo 060 C 235 



PUBLIC DOMAIN 



wmma^^mmmmmmmm 




c 

■ 

Q. 




Dave Stroud: has modem, will download. Here he is with 
another selection PD and shareware available from the Internet. 



BaillVlaster (demo 1) 

Type: Game 



Available from: Ami net; game, demo BallMaster.Iha 



Size: 103k 



ReqtiireniEnts: Any AGA or ECS Amiga, Ball Master 



Master of the balls, or just a load of the 
same? Well, there's a lot of therm (balls, 
that is). You have to rotate wheels with 
holes in to get the halls to drop into the 
holes. You need to fill each wheel with 
four identically-coloured balls to turn a 
little light in the middle of each wheel 
green (instead of red} and complete each 
level. Er, that's it. If all that sounded a bit 
uninspiring, then I guess we're on the 
same wavelength. You see, BallMaster 
isn't very interesting. It doesn't look 
attractive and doesn't sound attractive, 
You load it up, and you see a bright 
yellow topaz font [did I mention I hated 
that yet?) on a black low-res screen 
telling you that "Autumn Design pre- 
sents BallMaster... Demo Release One... 
Press mouse button to continue... (ESC 
to quit)". My gut feeling was to hit 
"Escape" there and then -to save myself 
from the despair that would usually fol- 
low such a bland introduction, but I 
thought: "No, wait a minute. There might 
be something to this game that I'm not 




expecting. Something truly awe-inspiring 
which will capture my attention. It 
would be wrong to judge a book by its 
cover," etc, I pressed the mouse button. 
Another screen of ghastly yellow Topaz! 
Aieeee! And this is the AGA version!?! I 
pressed it again, hoping that there 
would be something to reward my blind 
faith. A red screen with brown wheels 
and different coloured balls rolling back- 
wards and forwards. Oh. I'm really sorry 
to have to say this, but as it stands at 
the moment, BaltMaster just isn't very 
interesting. Yes, it is playable (in that it's 
not broken), but that's about all. With an 
overhaul on the graphics, sound and pre- 
sentation, it. would stand a much better 
chance of keeping me occupied far more 
then a few seconds. 

However it is only a demo release, so 
it may well improve beyond ail expecta- 
tions. Don't let me put you off from mak- 
ing those improvements, Damir - I'd like 
to see this game in its final incarnation 
and be proved wrongt * * 



lEU=rifii«..., Newrjport| ftj^ttrtl If*..] IIM... 
WlUoi fcj TtaniiT'jriff fhojif , *1»«H9i*''"gir&ift. 



Li 

A.,: 



et Payed 1.1 



°L 



[ S 1 fll i E I E I IB 



Program I Procedure* 



Prate I Bute* 
untitled 



Add j 
Petetej 



Rule* 



I Simple entry 



Load rule*.., 



Save rule* a*.,. 



-i2 



ype Payroll calculator 



Available from; Ami net: biz/misi/GetPayed lha 



Size: 230k 



Requirements: MUI 3,3+, Listtree.rocc 17. 0+, regtqols.library 38+. 



Do you spend countless hours at work 
these days? Don't know whether you're 
coming or going, clocking out for your 
lunch break, tea break, or because you've 
finished for the day? Forgotten when and 
how much you're due to get payed each 
month? Wish you didn't have to work at 
all? GetPayed won't tell you if you're in the 
wrong job, but it might prove to be an 
invaluable piece of software for those of us 
who work on a schedule with varying rates 
of pay depending on the time of day/week. 

By tapping in all the information about 
how long you've worked each day and 
specifying the rules which determine how 



much you should be payed per hour 
depending on when you work, GetPayed 
wili do all the hard work for you in working 
out just haw much lolly you're entitled to, 
The main project window provides tabs 
for every month of the year, and reports 
can be generated for a specifiable range of 
weeks or months. Calculation is done via a 
programmable set of rules, arid is therefore 
much more flexible than it first appears. 
Rather than specifying one or two fixed 
rates of pay it is possible to specify differ- 
ent rates for different times of day days of 
the week, even specific days of the year, 
GetPayed features an APt which will allow 



further expansion in the future. For exam- 
pie; currently, reports can only be saved in 
GetPayed's unique format, or as plain text, 
Thanks to its API. different file formats as 
well as new rules for pay calculation can 
easily be added to the program. 

Reading the documentation is thor- 
oughly recommended, as it will undoubt- 
edly take a while to get used to the 
intricacies of GetPayed's workings - a 
short tutorial could really help out here, 
GetPayed's author isn't sure of the pro- 
gram's future, so if you use it, be sure you 
drop Thomas a line to let him know you're 
interested, *** * 



PUBLIC DOMAIN 



Abe 



TV 

I in 
act 



Insulter I.O 



Type: Stress- r el iever 



From : Aminet:util'misc Insulter lha 



Size: 21k 



IrnJt! 



Requirements: A sense of humour? 

If you know what it's like to get really 
annoyed with people on Usenet shout- 
ing, complaining, flaming or spamming 
in excess, you could well appreciate this 
little program. The first insult it threw at 
me when I loaded it up might not have 
been out of place in the Star Wars trilo- 
gy. Imagine Han Solo yelling, "You irre- 
sponsible 
E | CQ stack of 

Wookie 
hair!" at 
Chewy. 
(He proba- 
bly did at 
some 
point, it 

just didn't make it into the final cut). 
Not only does Insulter gladly hand out 
toilet-humour one-liners, it Can do it in 
"Modem" or "Classic" tongues, "Thou 
bawdy sour-faced gudgeon! 
"Shakespeare it may not be, but a wel- 
come reliever of frustration and source 
of small amusement it is. It's even got 
an ARexx port, so you can integrate it 
with your favourite Email or News soft 1 
ware and dish out various insults on 
certain individuals who don't know 
when to shut up. Ah, what fun. 

It's a shame that Insulter doesn't 
appear to come with datafiles which can 
be changed or added to, because as it 
stands, it will tend to repeat itself half 
the time rather than give you a truly 
wide variation of insults. Despite this, it 
did manage to come up with, "You 
Windows using crate of earwax," so the 
fact that it's based on an old MS-DOS 
program obviously didn't stop Paul from 
experimenting with new phrases. 

Finally, Insulter will even use your 
Amiga to insult you audibly if you so 
wish, as long as you have the Amiga 
OS's "speech" facility. Quite why, only 
Paul knows. I know it's not the most 
earth-shattering of utilities to ever grace 
the Amiga, but it's fun, light-hearted 
and above all will at least bring a smile 
to your face. + + ** 



MUI CD Player 1.12 



Type: CD Player 



From: Aminet disk cdrommuicd lha 



Size: 169k 




Requirements: MUI 3.3, NListmcc .48, ATAFI/SCSI, CD32 compatible CD-ROM- __ _ — - — 



If you haven't 
already got your- 
self a CO player 
for your CD-ROM 
drive (something 
which nobody 
should be without 
these days) then 
MUI CD Player is 
the first stop you 
should make. I 
won't say any- 
thing about it 
needing MUI. as 
that should be 
plainly obvious. 

Instead, I'll talk about the new features 
of version 1,12 like balance control, 
position slider (which makes skipping 
to a particular place in a track as easy 
as you could possibly want it) and a 
new library for ATAP1/SCSI devices, 

An installer script has also been 
provided as from this release, and it 
makes setting up the program to work 
on your CD drive simply effortless, 
working flawlessly on my machine as 
soon as it had been installed. Lovely. 
The included CD Manager is also fea- 
ture-laden whilst remaining intuitive, 
providing the ability to edit disc infor- 
mation, search through all or part of 
your CD collection for keywords and 
import files from other CD players, 
saving you typing in all that informa- 
tion a second time if you decide to 
move from your regular brand of CD 
player to this one. 

The button images are just IFF 
brushes, so you can make your own if 
you don't like the look of the four sets 
provided in the archive, and a program 
can be saved for each CO, so that 
tracks are always played in a specifi- 
able order. If there isn't a program 
specified, selecting the "Auto 
MakeProgram," "Auto Shuffle," and 
"Auto Play" options will play all tracks 
in a random order as soon as a new 
disc is inserted. With all the features 
of version 1.12, it's hard to spot any 
missing features 






GUI ffl |*Q 




aiaiwioiBiga 




II I til * M ft 



IlAlufli Rliymsi track 3 



mtMi|| B*lara;B £ 



THI*, Shocttog ri«h movla flnurcdlrnr*: 



M 



OS S3 
[SOD 



Apaca - Tou i. Mo v? the World 

Tit* 5iip*rn«lur*^ - rh* Dny D*far* Y*i 
Sitvor Sum - Golden 8*ln 



r 



Edit. 



7TTT 



T, • ft 



that are desperate- 
ly needed. It's all 
there, and a quick 
flick through the 
documentation is 
all you need to dis- 
cover how to do 
anything which 
isn't immediately 
obvious. +•*■*-*•# 



Best of Aminet 

Several small but useful tools have found their way 
onto Aminet this month, util'sys; Quick ROM lha 
(12k) being the first. This is one of those utilities 
which copies the Amiga's Kick start into fast memo- 
ry, and claims to speed up the O.S. as a result. Now 
on version 36-08, this is Quick ROM's second Aminet 
release and sees the addition of a Workbench-friend- 
ly version which can be placed in the WBStartup 
drawer or double -clicked on to activate/ deactivate 
the program at will. Due to the nature of OuickROM, 
it requires either an '040 or '060- equipped Amiga 
with a Memory Management Unit (MMU1 to be of 
any use. 

The second utility is util/misc/Skimmer.Iha (84k) 
which provides another bonus for your system by 
searching for libraries that are no longer required by 
the programs that you use. These shared libraries 
can build up quickly on a system where lots of dif- 
ferent programs are installed and deleted on a regu- 
lar basts, and it's hard to tell which of them are still 
required at a later date. Skimmer makes a list of all 
these libraries, then scans all files on your hard disk 
that look like executables. When it's finished, you 
are presented with a list of all libraries that may not 
be required any more. You can then choose to delete 
or archive them {the latter of which is the safer 
option) in order to tidy up your libs: assign. 

Two more "simple but effective" tools are 
util/wb/FCtock lha (15k] and util/wb. WarpWBT2 lha 
(T9kJ. The former is yet another Workbench clock, 
but deserves a mention for not being bloated by 
seemingly infinite options. Simple, but effective - 
just like WarpWB, which helps to keep your 
Workbench screen tidy by closing old windows 
when you open new ones, Finally, mods/mpg. 'break- 
fast, lha (852ki seems like an apt tune at the time of 
writing. This 56 second long mpeg tune front 
Northern California's Experimental Media Research 
Laboratory features piano, bass, drums and trumpet 
and probably wouldn't sound out of place in a \dii 
club. Mmmm, great. 




PUBLIC DOMAIN 





m 


a 

■ 

Q 

a. 



It's Richard Drummond, with another luw- 
PD games and utilities available on disk. 

Chaos V3.3 _^____ . 



erly bunch of useful 




Type: Graphical/ mathematical application t . 

Available from: Online PD r Unit 5, Embassy Building, 51A Piercefield Road, Formby, 

Liverpool L37 7DG _ . _ . 

Tel: 01704 834335 

Price: |3 disks! E2.2S plus 75p P&P per order , _ _ 

By Martin Pfingstl, purports to be the last word in 
chaos and fractal exploration Fractals are experi- 
encing something of a renaissance - thanks to the 
prevalence of fast CPUs and colourful graphics dis- 
plays - and ChaosPro is the Amiga's offering as a 
state of the art tool for navigating this complex 
domain. It is aimed as a rival to tools like Fractlnt 
on the PC (which has now been ported to the 
Amiga), but outclasses this product easily, 

What is immediately mind-boggling about 
ChaosPro is its sheer scope and power - and the 

fact that it is freeware. It boasts features like full multi-windowing and multi-thread 
ing; the ability to scroll and loom images while they are still being rendered; a for- 

M editor; 3d transformation and animation tools; 24bit IFF 
_ jd graphic card support; and an ARexx interface. It can gen- 
erate Julia and Mandelbrot sets, Lyapunov Spaces, Plasmas, 
Bifurcation Diagrams, Lindenmayer Systems and much more. 
Although ChaosPro is not the fastest fractal generator on 
the Amiga, the fact that it is multi-threaded makes this fact 
irrelevant. It is quite possible to pin-point and blow up an area 
while it is still being drawn or even to work on a completely 
different image at the same time. This makes ChaosPro a very 
efficient package to use. The only real limit is your machines 
processor power and memory and hence this program would benefit considerably 
from a high specification machine. The minimum requirements are an 020 with FPU 
and 2Mb of memory, but this is unrealistic to perform anything useful. 

ChaosPro' s useir inter- 
face is a standard 
GadTools one, which is 
clear but tortuous to 
use, For a program of 
this intricacy, a more 
advanced GUt would be 
appropriate: it is just 
too difficult to navigate 
your way around the 
ma?a of options win- 
dows and tools docks, 
ChaosPro has so many 
features, that finding 
the one you want can 
be a chore, 
Nevertheless, ChaosPro is excellent, It is one of those pieces of software that v op will 
tinker with for ages. If yoy have an interest in mathematics, would like to create 
some stunning images, or just want something to show off the hardware power of 
your Amiga, this is the program for you. #** 



EdPlayer V2.1 

Type: Module player utility 



Available from: Underground PD, 

54 Carmania Close, Shoeburyness, Essex 

SS3 9YZ 



Tel: 01702 295887 
Price: £150 



EdPlayer is module player for 
NoiseTracker, Pro Tracker or MEO mod- 
ules. Visually it looks like a CD player 
and this resemblance extends to the 
interface as well. 

The version I was supplied with 
lacked any documentation. This is not 
too much of a problem since anyone 
can operate a CD player and the pro- 
gram has online help, but the user is left 
with no information on EdPlayer 's 
A Re xx port. Ed player opens only on a 
PAL screen, which is limiting, but it 





does have lots of other options, e.g., 
controls for MtDI, Filters, Tempo and 
progra mm ability, 

Despite its limitations EdPlayer is a 
visually attractive and useful way to 
play your collection of modules, 





PUBLIC DOMAIN 



Galaxians VI .3 



Type: Shqot'am up game 



MajorBank VI 



Available from: Classic Amiga PD r 11 Peansgata, Radcliffe, Manchester, M26 2SH 

Tel: QT61 723 1638 

Price: £1 plus 75p F&P per order 



Most of our readers should be old 
enough to remember Galaxians in the 
arcades, so this title needs little intro- 
duction. Galaxians VI. 3 by Kevin 
Gallagher is a near perfect conversion 

- graphically and sonically - of that old 
coin-op classic. Enough said, really. 

My only complaint is that, because 
it is written in AMOS, it will not multi- 
task with the rest of your system, Jt 
would have been a great little diver- 
sion to occupy time when you were 
waiting for your mail to download or 
for that latest C behemoth to compile 

- but sadly no, this is riot possible. 
Stilt, it's a good game. 

Assimilation 

Type; Shoot'em up game 
Available from: Online PD, Unit 5, 
Embassy Building, 51A Piercefield Road, 

Form by, Liverpool L37 7DG 

Tel: 01704 834335 



Price: 75p plus 75p P&P per order 

The creators of this game. Full speed 
Creative Development, were also the 
creators of the commercial game Virtual 
Karting. This may give you some idea 
what this, a freeware effort, is like. 
Assimilation is a sideways scrolling 
shoot em' up with ail the usual cliches 
of the genre. There are attack waves, 
power ups and end-of-level baddies: but 
no plot. 

Graphically the game is unimpres- 
sive. The uninspired and drab use of 
colour makes it look like it is running on 
a Commodore 64. In fact, this B-bit feel 

extends to the gameplay as well. The 

only novelty is the unusual addition to 

the control method of your spaceship: 

instead of just moving your ship up or 

down when the 

joystick is 

pushed up or 

down, the pitch 

of your ship 

increases and 

decreases as 

well. 

On the whole 

Assimilation is a 

competent, but 

unremarkable 

game. At this 

price, though, it 

is Still worth a 

look. * * *• 



If you want a dose of highly playable 
nostalgia, you could do far worse than 
get a copy of Galaxians. **•* 




FotoFit 98 

Type: Novelty 



Available from: Classic Amiga PD, 
11 Deans gate, Radcliffe, Manchester 
M26 25H 



Tel: 01617 231638 




Price: £1 plus 75p P&P per order 

CU r s deputy Editor, Andrew Korn, was 
fascinated by this program. He would 
claim that it is because he is an artist, 
but I think it is just that he hasn't grown 
up yet. 

FotoFit allows you to emulate the 
identi-kit process used by the police to 
identify criminals. That is, you can build 
up an image of a face using standard 
parts or features. For example, you may 
choose a particular head shape, hair 
style, nose shape, etc, from a supplied 
set That is just about it - not stunningly 
useful, but amusing. 

There are a few glaring omissions 
with the package: although it allows 
you to print out your efforts, you cannot 
export them as picture files. Also, a few 
standards tools, such as resizing and 
stretching of images for example, would 

be a bit more 
useful. 

Nevertheless, 
tf you are in 
need of a 
cheap laugh, 
then get 
yourself a 
copy of 
FotoFit and 
make some 
unflattering 
likenesses of 
your mates. 



Type: Business Application 

Available from: Classic Amiga PO, 
11 Deansqate, Radcliffe, Manchester, 

M26 2SH 

Tef: 0161 723 1638 



Price: £1 plus 75p PfrP per order 



& 



If your cash flow is a catastrophe and 
your fiscal planning a fiasco, why not 
let your Amiga take care of your bud- 
get? MajorBank is designed for just this 
purpose: it's an accounts package to 
help you manage your personal 
finances. 

The metaphor that MajorBank 
employs is similar to that of Digita's 
Money Matters. You can sat up a num- 
ber of accounts, say, one for your cur- 
rent account, one for your Visa, another 
for a loan, etc. You can then manually 
enter transactions for each debit or 
credit to the accounts; or you can 
define automatic transactions which are 
applied at regular intervals (like 
salaries, direct debits, etc). To each 
transaction you may apply a category 
to help you See where your money is 
going. MajorBank also offers tools like 
the cutting, pasting, searching, sorting 
and graphical display of transactions. It 
allows the printing and the importation 
and exportation in various formats of 
data. This freely distributable demo ver- 
sion is limited to 100 transactions. The 
full version is available from the author, 
Don at Michel, for $20 (about £12.50). 

The user interface of MajorBank is 
well thought out and all the program's 
functions fall readily to hand. The GUI 
is realised in the ClassAct style, which 
is none too pretty, but features like its 
adaptiveness to font and screen size 
mean it is a big improvement over 
Money Matters. The account transac- 
tions are all shown in one listviaw on a 
backdrop window; access to any of the 
other (up to 10] accounts that you may 
have open is via a tab gadget, A conse- 
quence of this is that you may view 
only one account at a time, whereas I 
would have preferred a multi-win- 
dowed approach. 

MajorBank will not make you a 
millionaire but remains a useful 
application,**** 









fiOisi = I 




69 



T2**®^Bbfc_. 



am* . 



I 



I 



mtiM 



• 



Are you a Digital Da II? Computer Carravagio? Send your pics to: 

Art Gallery, CU Amiga, 37-39 Mill Harbour, isle of Dogs, London El 4 9TZ. 














See your work in print... and win a print, too! 



Each month we will declare one picture in the 
Gallery to be picture of the month and if it is 
yours, we. will send you a print of your work 
output to an ultra high quality IRIS printer on 
glossy paper {that's around 25-30 quid from a 



print shop to you, guv') - you will never see 
your work looking so good! If you want to 
enter a picture into Art Gallery, either email it to 
artgaJ@cuamiga.co.uk or post in on disk to our 
normal address, marking the envelope Art Gallery, 



We recommend PNG format as it saves a lot ol 
disk space, but alternatively GIF or IFF are fine. 
* "JPeg' drops {mage quality so avoid where 
possible - also never use for images with 256 
or fewer colours. 




V 



J « 

Y2 

J 




ti 




USER GROUPS 





Let our international user-group directory put you in contact with other 
Amiga users in your local area. To add a new group to the list, just fill in 
the form on the opposite page. 



Amiga Christ church Inc. 

Location: Chnstchurch NewZealand 

Contact: Annette Leonardo 

Telephone: +64 03 3390232 

Meeting times; Second Tuesday of every 

month 7:30 prn. 

Places. Shirley Community Centre, 

Shirley fid 

Address: AC!. PO Box 36-107, 

Christchurch, NZ 

Amipack 

Location: World Wide -An Amateur 

Radio Amiga Group 

Contact: Paul Carson 

Email: OJKus@Car50nJ.dara net 

Telephone: N/A 

Meeting times: TBA 

Places: On the Amateur Radio Packet 

Network 

Address: 'Q Be Igravia Avenue, Bangor, 

Co. Down, N.Ireland 

6T196XA 

Waaslandia 

Location: Belgium 

Contact. Tony Mees 

Email: waasland@glo.be 

Telephone; +32(0)3744 1319 

WWW hli p : //ti tan .gto.be/---wa3siand 

Meeting times: 12 meetings per year. 

Places' We have 6 Amiga dubs in 

Belgium:- Antwerpenj Mertsem. Aalst: 

Machelen; Turnhout; St-Niklaas 

Address: Lepelstraat 11, 9140 Steendorp 

Belgium 

Wigan.-' West Lanes Amiga User Group 

Location. Wigan/W Lancashire 

Contact: Simon Brown/Ralph Twiss 

Email" ssamiga@warp.eo.uk 

Telephone: Simon, 01257 402201 or 

Ralph; 0169S 623865 

WWW; www,werp,COuk/-SSamig3 

Meeting Placas:St Thomas the Martyr 

School Hall, Highgate Road, Up Holland, 

{ ancs 

Address. 79Woodnook Road.Appley 

Br.dge, Wigan, WN6 9JR 6 

32 Higher Lane, Up Holland. West LanCS 

Alpha Software 

Local ion: Newcastle, UK 

Contact: Gareth Murfin 

Email: gazyrJ0globalnet.co.uk 

Telephone: 01670 715454 

WWW: 

http. //www. users. globalnot.co.uk/ - gazy; 

Meeting times. 8 • 9pm. 

Places: IRC #AmlRC GelaxyNet 

Address: Alpha Software. Gareth 

Murfin. 1 13, Cateran Way, Collingwood 

Grange Cramiington 

Northumberland. NE23 6EZ. UK. 

Convergence International 

Location: International 

Contact: Ben Clarke 

E mail : enq ui ries@convergence.eu.org 

Telephone: 0956 '965959 

WWW; 

www. convargence.au.org 

Meeting times: 8pm (GMT), Wednesdays 

and Sundays 

Places- #converge (IRCneU 

Address: 49 St. Gilberts Road, Bourne, 

Lines. United Kingdom 

Amiga Club G*nk iACGI 

Location- Genk. Belgium 

Contact: Bart Vanhaeren 

Email: amiga.club.gefikfJBskynetbe 

WWW: http .//users. skyeet.ba/amiga/acg 

Meeting times: every 1st Sunday of 

month 

Places: Cultural Centre of Genk, meeting 



room 1 

Address: Weg rsaarZwartberg 248 

B-3660 OPGLABBEEK. BELGIUM 

Relax ITC 

Location: Poland 

Contact- Shandor 

Email: shandorl@poibDx.com 

Telephone: +48-91-357184 

Meeting times: TBA 

Places; unspecified 

Address; ui.Macieiewicza 1/27 

1' 004 Szczecin 10. Poland 

National Capital Amiga User Group 

Location: Washington DC USA 

Contact: Fabian Jimenez 

Contact by. Phone (please send us your 

phone number... Fabian) 

Telephone- 301*924-0750 (iflpm - 1am 

EST) 

Meeting times: 12:00 noon EST 

Places; Dolly Madison Library 

Address: Fabian Jimenez NCAUG 

P0 Box 12360. Arlington. VA 22209 USA 

Amiga World Special Interest Group 

Location: Athens, Greece 

Contact: Menis Malaxianakis 

Telephone: 301 -9026810/9012019 

WWW: http:ZAwww.com pulink.gr/amigy 

Meeting times: 5pm Saturdays Places; 

Athens 

Address: Mems Malaxianakis. Giannitson 

llstc. 17234. Dafni Athens Greece 

Amiga Forever! 

Location- Hampshire 

Contact: Stuart Keith 

Telephone: 01 703 861842 all day 

Meeting limes/p laces. TBA 

Address: 101 Ewell Way, Totton, 

Southampton. Hams S040 3PO 

Mutual Amiga Computer Enthusiast 

Location. Beresfield, Newcastle. 

Australia 

Contact; Ken Woodward 

Email: ken@rich.com.au 

Telephone: after working hct.rs 

Meeting times: 7pm 1st & 3rd 

Wednesday of month 

Places: Beresfield Bowling Club. 

Address. 59 Carnley Avenue. New 

Lamblon, Newcastle. NS Wales Australia 

Kickst&rt, Surrey Amiga User Group 

Location: Surrey 

Contact: Rob Gilbert 

Email; giibieviairakis. u-nat.com 

Telephone: 01932 875336 

WWW: www.arrakis.u-net.com 

Meeting times/places: Monthly [TBAi 

Address: 10 BRox Road. Ottershaw, Surrey 

KT1BOHL 

Canberra Amiga Users Society Inc 

Location: Canberra. ACT, Australia 

Contact" Ale* Cameron | Secretary \ 

Telephone: (02) 6286 2965 

WWW: 

http ://www.sp irit.net.au/'-iamsJim 

/CAUS/ 

Meeting times: 2nd Thursday of the 

month from Spin. 

Places: Woden Town Centre Library 

(Entry -The Elm Cafe) 

Address: Canberra Amiga Users Society 

PO Box 596, Canberra ACT, 2601, 

Australia. 

XCAD User 
Location- in Ireland 
Contact: Tony McGartland 
Telephone: 01662 250320 (after 6pm) 
Meeting Times/Places: TBA 
Address- 11 La mmy Drive, Omagh, Co 
Tyrone BT79 5JB 

ICPUG SE Computer Club 



Location: Biggin Hill, Kent 
Contact- Len Beard 
Telephone: 01689 813 616 
Meeting times: Thursdays B-IOpm 
Places: Biggin Hill (phone for details). 
Address; &6 Rookesly Rd, Orpington, 
Kent BRS4HJ 

Colchester Amiga Farum 

Location. Colchester, Essex 

Contact: Patrick Mead 

Telephone: 01206 212 B64 , (Mon-Fri 

Email: pjmead© Hot mail 

Meeting Times/Places: TBA 

Addrass:9 Windmill Ct, Copford, 

Colchester. Essex. COi UH 

Daal Amiga Club 

Location: Deal, Kent 

Comact: John Worthington 

Telephone: 01304 367 992 

Meeting times: 7pm Fridays. 

Places: St John Ambulance Hall. Mill Hill, 

Deal, Kent 

Address, too Trinity Place. Deal. Kent 

Amiga Service 

Location; Charleroi, Belgium 
Contact: Hoet Raphael 
Telephone: 003271 459 244 (9am-6pm) 
Masting times/places: TBA 
Address: Rue Du Nord 93, 6 ISO 
Courcatles, Belgium 

Extreme Coders 

Location- Sheffield 

Contact. Mark Johnston 

Telephone: N/A 

Meeting Times/Places: Contact for 

details 

Address: 1st Floor. 135 Upperthorpe Rd, 

Upperthorpe, Sheffield. S6 3E8 

Stoke Amiga User Group 

Location. Stoke on Trent. Staffs 

Contact; Paul Shelley 

Telephone: 01762 633 219 

Meeting Times; 7.30pm Wednesdays 

Places: Jester Public House, Biddulph Rd 

Address 1 19 Houtdswonh Drive, Fegg 

Hayes, Stoke on Trent, Staffs. STB 6TG 

Amiga Falcons 

Location: Malmo. Sweden 

Contact: Carl-Johan Rudnert 

Telephone -46 40 932212 

WWW: 

http://Www.algonet.se/ -rncisaac/amiga 

Address: Amiga Falcons, c/o Carl-Johan 

Rudnert. Vebenodsgstan 9. SE-212 2B 

Malmo SWEDEN 

Finnish Amiga Users Group 

Location: Finland 

Contact: Janne Siren 

WWW: http://batrnan.jytol.fi/'-gaku/ 

Address: Janne Siren 

Orgvamaentie 2 F 17 

02750 Espoo. FINLAND 

Amiga Computer Enthusiasts of 

Elkhart, Indiana 

I ocation: Northern Indiana. USA 

Contact: Gregory Donner 

Telephone: (2191 875-8593 (after 5pm \ 

WWW: 

www cyberl inki nc . com/gd on n er/ace. htm 

Meeting times; Second Saturday Of the 

month 

Places. 26728 Hampton Woods Dr.. 

Elkhart. IN 46514 

Address: 60300 Pembrook Lane, Elkhart, 

IN 46517-9167. USA 

Photogenic^ & ImagsFX Utftrs 

Location- Stanford-te-Hope, Essex 

Contact: Spencer 

Telephone: 01375 644614 (9am-9pml 

WWW: 



http //web. uko nline.co.uk/speiicer.ja- 

ontent5.html 

Meeting times/Places; TBA 

Address: 44 Brampton close, 

Corringharn 

Sianfo?d-le-Hope. Essex. SS17 7NR 

No Specific Name 

Location: Greentord Community Ce' 

London 

Contaci: Richard Chapman 

Telephone; 0181 938 8599 5pm-8pm 

week, all day at weekends 

Meeting times: 7pm-10pm Thurs 

Place; Greentord Community Centra 

Address: 96 Meadvaie Road, Ealing, 

London. W5 1NR. 

AmyTech Amiga Users Group 

Location- Dayton Area. Ohio. USA 

Contact: John Feigleson 

Telephone: 19371667-9541 Af ter 6pr- 

WWW; 

www.coax. net/people/encs/Amitecti 

Meeting time: 3rd Saturday of the rr 

- 1:30pm 

Placee:Huber Heights Library 

Address- AmyTech. PO. Box 292634 

Kettenng. OH 45429-0684 

South West Amiga Group 

Location: South Wesl England 
Contact: Andy Mills 
Telephone: 01275 330703 17-10.30pm 
weekdays, anytime weekends 
Emaol: swag@wtiarne.u-net.com 

WWW http : .'■' w ww. w hfjrue.u- 

n et.com/swag/ 

Meeting Times/Places: Every 1st 
Thursday c-f the month ai ihe Lamb & 
Flag, Cribbs Causeway, Bristol from 
8 30pm (contact to confirm venue first i 
Address; 51 Whamecltfffl Gardens, 
Whitchurch, Bristol. &S14 9NF 

Tug ge rah Lakes Computer Users Group 

Location- Central Coast, NSW, Australia 

Contact: Darrell Keirnan 

Meeting Times; 1st & 3rd Thursday 

of every Month 

Places. Berkeley Vale Public School 

7 00pm 

Address: PO Box 659, Toukfey. NSW. 

Australia 2263 

Tasmanian Commodore Users 

Association Inc 

Location. Hobart, Australia 

Contact' Erir; Filhsijh 
Telephone: I'OtB) 120 787 
Meeting times; 7;30-9:30pm. 3rd 
Wednesday ot the month 
Places: Contact for address 
Address- GPQ Box 673, Hobart GPO 
TAS 7001 

University Place Commodore Home 
Users Group 

Location: Tacoma, Washington USA 

Contact: Jim McFarland 

Telephone: (253) 265-3478 evenings 

WWW- hi.? p : //www. nwl ink. co m/— red- 

beard/u pchug/ 

Meeting times. 4th Thursday evening o* 

each month 

Places: Fircrest Community Center, 

Tacoma, WA 

Address: PO Box IT 191, Tacoma, WA 

96411-0191. USA 

R.A.V.A. 

Location Alkmaar, the Netherlands 

Contact: Roland de Herder 

Telephone: Wanna call international? Ask 

me for my number. 

WWW: 

http :/Awww. cybercomm.nl/-macron/rava 

htrrl 







IJewing times: 1 2 times a year 
peces: Alkrnear 
ddress: Ft. de Herder. Ewislaan 3B 
852 GM Heiloo, The Netherlands 
V*us Help Team - Norway 
r: Norway 
ict: Helge Syne 
■lap hone: -1-4790175626 
P*WW: http://horne.sol.ne.''- sye 
ddress; Roeyrvikveuen 40 
X SKUDENESHAVN 

cwccc 

Location: West Midlands 

ntad; Luke Stowe 
PJphcne: 0966 467596 (after 10am) 
WrWW: None vet 
Veei ng -.hies Sprn-l ' en 

■s:Earl£dcn Methodist Church. 
Address: 9 Trossachs Rri. 
Mount Nod, Coventry, 

Milgnrt 

Location: Istanbul 

ict: Guvenc KAPLAN 
- e phone: 00902 16-30209 15 
•Y'A'Vv htt p : /./www, medyatext ,com .t 
■ amigart 

Meeting times: Two a month 
os. Anywhere 

ess: Ortabahar sok. No.1 Hayat apt 
BlfjeO Go ztepe- Istanbul 
rfcey 

Commoddrs Computer User Group 
Queensland 

Location: Brisbane. Australia 
Contact; Ftonny Blake 
Telephoned 07 13287 1790 
/W: 

it: p: www.powerup.com. an/- rasilin 

Meeting limes- 1st Tues of month. 7- 

9pm & 2nd Sun of month 1 2 pm to 4pm 

rlaces:St Laurence's College. 

62 Stephens Rd. S Brisbane Qid. 

Address 3 Conoble Court, Eaglaby, Gold 

Coast. Queensland, 4207. Aost 

Ayrshire Amiga Society 

Location. Irvine. Ayrshire, Scotland 

Contact Maitland or Dale 

Telephone. 01292 267959 or 01234 

275535 

Meeting times: Wednesdays 

Places. Annick Community Centre. 

Irvine 

Address: 49 Belmont Road. Ayr 

Scotland. KA7 2PE 

West London Computer Club 

Location: West London 

Contact: Alan Pay me r 

Telephone: 0191-932-1866 

Meeting limes: 1st and 3rd Tubs of month 

Places- Duke Of York Public House 

Address: 19 Harlech Tower. Park Rd East, 

Acton, London, W3 BTZ 

Dublin Amiga Users Telephone 

Helpline* 



Location- Dublin, Ireland 
Contact: Eddie McGrane 
Telephone: 4-353-01-6235903 
WWW- 

hitp://www.. reland.amiga.org/helpline.hrt 

ml 

Meeting times. Anytime 124 hrs. r 

Address. 27 St. Rnians Green. Lucan. Co. 

Dublin. Eire 

Central Arkansas Amiga Users Group 

Location: Little Rock, Arkansas 

Contact.. Tim Grooms 

Telephone: 501-BE1-7418 

WWW: http://www.concentric.netA; 

aaug.html 

Meeting Times/Places: Monthly TBA 

Address: 14 Hickory Lane, Maurnelle, AR 

72113. USA 

Stoneybririge BBS 

Location: Dorset. UK. 

Contact- Ozz 

Telephone: 012O2 679156 <10:30pm-6am 

GM1 

Address: 60 Junction Rd, Hamworthy 

Poole, Dorset. (c/oNBI.UK.) 

Amiga User Group of Western Australia 

Location: Perth. Western Australia 

Contact: Arthur Rutland 

Telephone: OB 93641717 

Meeting times: 2nd Tues or month at 

7pm 

Places.'Curtin University 

Address: 31 Chaffers St. Morley 

Western Australia. 6062 

Amiga Computer Group 

Location; Urnea, Sweden 

Contact: Martin Sahlen 

Telephone. ■ 46-1 0)90-2461 6 <24 hrs.1 

WWW: httpV/wwwamiga-cg se 

Meeting times: Tuesdays 1900 

Places- Kate Station. Urnea 

Address: Skolg&tan 14, SE-903 22 UMEA. 

Sweden 

Huddersfield Amiga Users 

Location: Huddersfield. W Yorks 

Contact: Geoff Milnes 

Telephone: 01434 543534 

WWW: http:. ''/www. geemil.demon.co.uk 

Meeting times: 7.30pm onwards 

Places Commercial Inn, Market 

St, Paddock Huddersfield. 

Address: 6 Ochrewell Avenue, 

Oetghton, Huddersfield, W Yorks. 

Highland Amiga User Group 

Location- Highlands, Scotland 

Contact 1 Tommy MacDonald 

Telephone: 01667 404757 Anytime 

WWW. http://azone.prohostirtg.com 

Meeting Times/Places. TEA 

Address- 7 County Cotiages, Piperhill 

NAIRN. Scotland. IV12 5SE 

Team Amiga 

Location: Worldwide 

Contact: Gary Peake 

Telephone: 1 281 350 2194 

h ttp : //www. wans, net' - g pea ke/l i n ks . h i mi 



Meeting times Daily 

Places All Nets and IRC 

Address: 19723 Teller Blvd 

Spring, Texas USA 77338 

Knox Computer Club 

Location: Galesburg. IL USA 

Contact: Mitch Ourdle 

WWW: www.galeshurg.net/-kcc 

Meeting limes 

First Tuesday of Month 7pm 

Places: 695 N Kellogg Galesburg. IL 

(in the auditorium) 

Address: Kno* Computer Club 

1003 East fifth Ava. 

Monmouth, IL 61462 

USA 

AmigaTCS 

Location: Columbia Missouri 

Contact- Terry Booher 

Telephone: (573,617 2948 

Meeting times: 7pm 2nd tues of month 

Places: TBA 

Address: 1 15 West Phyllis Avenue 

Columbia M0 65202 

USA 

South West Amiga Group - Sydney 

(SWAGS) 

Location: Campbelltown, Sydney. 

Australia 

Contact; Merit Vine 

Telephone: (02)46311801 After 7pm 

WWW: None yet 

Meeting times. 7prn-iODm 2nd & 4th 

Wed of every month 

Places: Airds Community Centre, 

Riverside Dr. Airds 

Address- n Kennedy Grove, 

Appin, N.5.W. 

Australia 2660 

Computer club Aktief 

Location. Letyatad, the Netherlands 

Contact: Ji Yong Dijkhuis 

Telephone: -31(01020 241741 mot af:e?r 

23:00 CET) 

hltp.V/mcs.nl/aktief/amiga/Bmiga.html 

Meeting times; Every monday 19:30 til 

23.00 

Places: Buurthuis de Krakeling (same as 

the postal address f 

Address: Computer Club Akt>e f 

p/a Buurthuis de Krakeling 

r j-:"j r : : 166 

8224 DJ 

Lerystad. The Netherlands 

Medwpy & Maidstone 

Amiga Collective 

Location: MedwHyfi Maidstone 

Contact: David Prudence 

Telephone 0961 809466 

Mealing times/places: TBA [phone for 

details) 

Address: 24. Norman Rd, Snodland Kent 

ME6 6J0 

SOGA - Si Otro Grupo Amiga 

Location: Manresa-Torrelavega-Mavarra 

(Spain) 

Contact. Santiago GutiErraz CoflEs 



Telephone: 942 338 243 

WWW: http: //persons I. redeslb es/sguti 

Meeting times/places: TBA 

Bodmin Amiga User* Klub Ibauk) 

Location: East Cornwall 

Contact- Nick 

Meeting times/places: Bodmin or Pelynt 

(TBA) 

Address. Croft Cottage 

Jubilee Hilr 

Peiynt. Looe 

Cornwall 

PL13 2JZ 

The PIE BBS 

Location: Dunstable. Beds 

Contact: Carl Moore 

Telephone; (01 5B2) 606179 

WWW; www.bog hole, demon, co.uk/pie/' 

Meeting limes: 10; 30pm - 7am (Call 

between (he specified hours only, and 

make sure you call with ya modeml) 

Address: n/a 

The Other Realm 

Location: England 

Contact: Peter Luckhurst 

WWW: http://www.geoa lies .corn/holly- 

wood/7440 

Meeting times/places: TBA 

Address: Peter Luckhurst 

1 6 South Way 

Shirley 

Croydon 

Surrey 

CRO SRP 

2260 Designs 

Location; Cyberspace 

Contact: Chris Korhonen 

Telephone - n/a 

http7/www.usefs.ietnet. co.uk/Vorhonen 

Meeting times- Sat-Sun 8pm 

Places: ire pureamiga.eo uk #E226Q 

Address: n/a 

Club De Usuarios Amiga Zaragoza 

Location: Zaragoza, Spain 

Contact. Carlos iranzo 

Email: cuaz@arrakrs.es or 

iP308295@public ibercaja.es 

WWW: biosys.nefcuaz 

Meeting times.. 5-9 pm Thursdays. 

l0:30am-2 :30pm Sundays 

Places- Alferez flojas 14, 50010 Zaragoza 

Address. ApdO. 246. 50001 Zaragoza, 

Soah 

Backwoods BBS 

Location: Inverness, North Scotland 

Contact: Lewis Mackenzie 

Telephone: +44 [0]I463 371676, 24Hrz 

WWW: http :/Avww2.presiel. co.uk/back- 

woods/ 

SEAL (South Essex Amiga Link) 

Location: South Essex 

Contact: Mick Sutton (sicky) 

Telephone: 01 268 761429 ' before 9pm 

WWW: http://welcome.to/seal 

Meeting times/places- various/ire 

Address: n/a 



Send this form to: User Groups; CU Amiga, 37-39 Mtlharbour, Isle of Dogs, London, E14 9TZ. 
Alternatively, fax it to: 0171 972 S755, or UM the online version of the form which can ba MOMwd from 
our website at: www.cu.amiga.co.uk This service is completely free of charge. 

General Location: 

Tel: 



Group name: 
Email: 



Postal Address: 



Web site: 



Contact name: 



Meeting Ti mas/ Places: 



Preferred contact met hod. (pi ease tick) 
E-mail J Phone J Post J 



Ask 




73 



I 



All You Need For Internet And Comms! 



netconnect v2 



£59,95 Y high quality modems 



£69.95 



NetConnect v2 is th* MSie*t and most comprehensive Internet compilation designed to enable any Amiga 
user, torn novice Id super; level, Id get Ohio and use the Internet. Based around 1 1 commercial programs 
(Including Ihe Contact Manager}, and won* over CI 50 if bought soparalely. you are given all you will n»d 
to get the most From ttie Intemel. By using ma new Genesis Wizard, a user Should be able connect to the 
Internet in a matter of minifies, (deal for both art Internet or local area network connection, 

ft Commercial Programs within NetConnect v2! 
AMITCP-GENESI5 . ,-VQYAGER-NG 



hud MW TO"*" Unci. htmil few* «i And TCP 
PrflftMiilllGl ?4&. Wfl tint Bfkt«d D numljflr tf 
chu^ii - mw Wie**C, inuhipj** pfWfUW ■UppOPL 
mnlti- uur nupport, '■miHil.si' etMWOJ, iUttH ttAn&m 
(HfTH -5« 'Hit wnn^etafi m—4) n*w Lmi[r-jL.Wi. 

ifflBtK now p**jhj pic 



Internet 



MICRODOT.II. 



A SU][Wrb DDmUrad «fn4-l BmJ nfwjrwK*^ .wtthatn 

«» QUI! Contains Jll tfr# mayor iwturw >uu 
wuuu mjlmuuI • MIME atacf^wr.-t. H*pcw^ f^ - 
KhPi'WOf!, »«dri:*i luiiLliuii, m u fa p I* -Sign dew's *. 
■i support Af*iM port itC. 






AMIRC- 



?S 



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Chtfl 0*lMn« Wfth 1n»nrjij .itunnl Ic-;iii:k |mn 
HHAimDH, nroaniM m^irrwtdc^. ThH IRC a 
&rtt LH" ** fPOlt JtffJcbW tfflmwhS ffl tti? Int-riml 
- AnilRC rl Uit D*H 4n>4* «C Cletf-t 



" ITB "" 

"Wrwt Into ne»TTPt» cnnipui^r^ £"=™ wiyawtui™ in 
Hw worttf] ■ *fflt flle-9 on * comput** - ■* fount* ■■- 
hrihti y=na Aviiifte*. mjJnrjJn -utrectortofl- Tor vev 

w»h n"B"* cFvch BTM lllrlUI "Of i*r+ ftWWOfk, p4*p- 




AMTERM 

AmTirtn )■ ■ commui^&Jfciiurtf pflCkalQ* wtoch 
.<dlnMn ynu fca niinnni:l 1u y BBS, » .null-'Ji UHT 
}d#vc1 linh/ InjnqFfr hln vu iiinl cnnnHi:huii. 



Q 



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a 



■^^ / 



\ 



Vu«Kl ihi DtfH Amlgfl ¥ntfr lynwwr =i, "JU 
AjTinfii - ^ Jiiiulli 3BL 10T K:yrr crrl-Miri; 
H"1P 1.1 |lo- DM IfriVlAil wtb -HKHtftf 
ftyilrwn (L&A snippcrl juM felt mtffl 1fl 
•StDW imtflVVl, HulH-ln FTP HiiLI HhWBi 

luppct and much mare 



'AMFTP 



A/nFTF 11- B** uHpntnn Amiq- nVi 
DfcwnlOerdiip-c-ic proflrw"! from m, FTP> 
hiIu. alia iuppuili ADT 10 ■•'low |nE»V t-r. 
ncvmluHd iha Idttll litti tram th* APIIIWl 
h FTP JtUIrl Idf 1H**. 



- AMTALK 

si urttirttt bnfeiWplKlfH MfYlDfl hir D4^p4ff 
1Q *a>« TlBSffflflflP- T'W C-h" ^h'^- u<ri£D^ 

■BHlinia' [j lYItftdi-un The InlcriK 1 :. 



L 



NETINFO 



Ni'l|i""J -S a COtf bOOl Tor grujh^Jnfi IhH 

iiHiwum And iha ptopM lonntdw) "n rt - 

MinfHir yuur IrHrOk bj vtii il C*i#V Jre^Mna. 
■pmn - wwni Ik *rd 1h«i rnpiulM tf*+l 



LX-ARC 

!t-*re It B>* i^^*I m»»w In WbiUP™ - 
JUtOmitlCKIy dKHMl^HKIHM LMA.Ul.'Zlf 1 

film*. Mttt th* «w1»nti fft 1tm+ BThiwwi, 



■ DOCUMENTATION 



CONTACT MANAGER 

CtnferaJ m«n«p«n™n1 ill w*fl lifikh, ftp Ml'iafl, ChaL Channel. 

jcoinlUe tiwn Vnfiswi UO-9, «*mBC STF.t Pro. 

Pius much more,. 

» MIME PrefS - Cenlral MIME prefa interface means (hat you Ofily ii**d to setup file types once wilh on 
nice mleriace! This saves masses o( lime end effort (CSpetially It* begtnnera}. 

• Programs are mow ksyfUo hfise-d (can ba used wilh anv TCP *1ach - Miami etc) 

• Deck bar - allow* you 10 create multiple dock bars with point and click case - Just drag trie icons you 
have cr*lled Into the toon bar! NetConnect v2 is pns-setup with il* own icon bar lor ease ol use. 

NfjtConneCt U2 CD Iconuna mar^ ntias: datalvpea. M"** lypes Hot w*>* tHWWgl anQ much n™e| £59. 95 

ecaJ!! 



£29.95 



NetConnect v2 Upgrade frorn v1 [«»«»»«* wcwmd vi um or»y| 



stfax professional < g£ft. 



STFax frofej¥«M)«V is new eommenclal fax and voice mail program which enables yoxj to use your Amiga 
as a digital answer machine, send and receiu* taxes, ftom most Amiga programs and seluo a ml(il-B6S. 
Evsr wondered who companieE manage to create Itwir vote* 6*iS*d operator system? You can do this at 
home! 'Press one to bay* • message- for Mike or press two to- leave a message Icir Sue'. STFax is also 
Weal for Irte small business owner selup a fax on demand sarvloe (so customers can receive inlofmation 
aboul your c»odu*tS 24 nouns a day), advanced message bon system lor the employee's, log callers, via 
caller-ID, control other program* *tC- Mow ua.3 otters you even mora powerful voittt features, including: 



■■■.iMwr-i- 



l ,-.. , u— I .»■« 



H l l l W 



J 






' Full Fax Feeturas; 

- Full Fai(/WwJ*m Oiu 1,1. Z, ZjO| SupfHrt 
PhwiiitHok. - ihm a* ylmr Itx £TXt t«l«pr>ork1 nwt&r* 

■ SefnAlU* - S10I* IRJ mflss.igoi r- r.cnc s.'. xx-z\\ M Urnpi 
BnudaDstaiD - send cue tai Id iWH« than ana reclpenl 

• RofSWt* - qMlfiWy B9* whflr, H.tanc was sdnE amd rucoiyed 
Pnnt*r Ovnmr - redirect ai pfinl-aul» \xt i lux die [pt^it rrion - , 
Worttuwni, FttflMlrearn FmnJ Wrnor, a hurt kMdt obdh 

- Fdji: Trtw*ir ■ ui»w Dutpaingyinmminfi lax rtiertoflSfl ' 

- F«i F4rwart - toward la»« to sr^hsr mBchino 

• Advanced Voice Features: 

- AavancmJ Digital Amtntr Maichlng - unlimited Klcnge space 
. Multiple Uior i assign raiceSMKes to individual UMTS. A Tamiy could ticva J 

Yaicabox per nwrt* artd WC4** lh«lr gwn Jiicn Tvaisagns. 

- Adunnc*d Vuci Scnpung - crento volt awn vcicv I'wtwOn^ax Oft demand wr*nc* 

■ Uao the Modem off e T*l*e«»|He - mnfae ajnd mcaiva caOs ifla STFauc Pin and iraur modem 

- R«mot« Ace*u . Iislan 1n ynur n-flsssjra from ad Mutfnal BOIirc*. I*, rreim anomai- phone w even raniMry! 

- Collsr-ID - vtm who U Cftliivi W*> (numear and iuith at callcrl, choose La inleit*pt Hie can or alio* SThu 1a sutD-niHweT, 
1H Hhm haa lilt a. mossafle and 'reply' Id rlw eftllftf via »I4 rr>«)*m, BKtacn a, penmnal greeting ID HepeeiRfi phon» nuntwr 
end only lhat p«fflOn h»»rt (ha mnsiac)B. 

EitHiuil Program Caritral - start en Srfcw tettOt WfWi a?1 incommg tnll is denc-nted ar wtien Iha teBer has Hunflup ilX) 
cOTMrul fiiraiH programR- A midic plnyar caUd pause tar an mc-amina. coll erd than continue wnan caJi has ended. 
Call Scrawling - blacklist pnenfl number*. Skshol SiffB p«jpl» cettng aJtar 6pm? huisanco rallerfi? Hlflcfclint Weir 
Humbert (you can- S'-en Ma^klist 'viMWiold'. 'unsi-ailahle' end 'iMemmional' ilumb«i«) V) STTu ailhor ignores rhoir cat or 
■Imply pteye a auenpm nreeMa L aOrnv thiB h(5ii(W*Old *•* IXH iwlcaino coid sale capV! You iart a»*0 *6t piW1t»« P" 
ripfujr - STTax i>o|lcad; an impcrtant caaer, it plays a warn "lu eaudd. 

• Ca»Scnpl3- ealup oedpto to pertonn an acuon onun Incenung cal, eg. paue? vnuf muiio BOttwBr? ti"|ll ln« call unrated. 

• Irtdepervdent Operation Mode [new in v3.3'i; 

- Modem wpm.7 ii^Jeoend^ity rrom Amiga 1o stce fiwee. or votoe T«ssaqes. DowrtlDfld rt&w m^Ksagfli prlaKas ta STFax 
Pm and than wcw/plary/manage them wilhm Ihe ^Cftware. 

• Sottweji lutlr supports the kldepwdwil Operation meda at the PACE. 'Sola' ypj aart upload a grosllraj 1u IIh modom, 
Batup a nomol* rational paiswom, arrange Ihe unique (£*aw <W lealure tmoi*iil contacls you by nrabio phonfi' w1l«l you 
have messages) and ewilCnes 1ha ind^p^hrfaiirt mode <iri and art (an eirtk J-Corn 'Metseafja Plua" modain K) als* 
BUOpflrlad |but Ihii modem has tar more limned real area than the 'Solo' and rev UK Caller ID suppD-1|. 



ik 



Chooee from three high-quality branded modems - the top of Ihe range, awa» 

wlrwlng PACE SfiK, Ihe new PACE "Solo" 5SK or the mldd»e of Ihe range Dynalink 

modem. Both come wiW a two year warranty. The PACE modem also Ships with 

free lifetime lechnieal support, UK caller Iti (cjily modem available which supports 

this.), a superb speaksrphane, conferencingi featu**, volume slider, easy lo 

understand LEDs and rtOrt-leChnical, easy to mad documentation, Th*- PACE is 

eumentlj- ma best S6K modem you can buy, virtually winning every single modem 

roundup in Iha PC, Inlemfrt and Mac press. Alt PACE 56K modems art- now v9D shipping i 

Ihe agreed standanJ for 56K connecliviiy, Why not Ireat yLJuraelf to the brand new PACE 'S 

The 'Solo' be Lratd ttandalone from your Amiga. Want to go on holiday but need to receive fan r*t 

voice messages, but dont wanl lo l*fcve> your Amiga running? The 'Solo' ■& tbe answer. 



©*<=« External 56K Modem 



©— «■* 'Solo' 56K Modem 




> Quality branded FACE D6 yaice modem 

• *SO ready [new 56K erandafd) 

. 5 yanr warranty, hie erne tree technical euppO«1 

• S6O00 hps DATA/FAX/VOrCS nrodem - Irue i;S4* 
"mrou^hpul 1d 11&.2E0 (230,400 1or internall BPS 

■ droup 3, Class 1 send/receive FA.X [14,4] 
' V.BO (yide4 ,w>rarancing> capable 

■ Call thsoHminaban 

■ UKCall** 10 |Linlqu» t» PACC modems) 

■ 10 LED? for lull Matui monikiriny 

■ Arigiogua EimultariOQUs uaiDB end dala (A.S.V.O.h 

■ Speakerphane tor hare*ft-1V*# ap*rfln1*n 

■ Mute tKltton lor Money 

■ Upgradable ROM chip 

• On/on sullen to mar ptfinlt 

■ Vofeima ikder Idt speakerphone c<*llrOl 

■ fcioliid** h«dejicn»*»n*cri3pjiar»i. . voice conbol 

■ Sana! cable included I'with a A £5pin eortnactnrs) 



The PACE 'Solo' 5SK nxidem r»p*ae«a yo»ir a jlihng 
1fti, jinfcinarmnthina and modem. IE can wort 
ieidepvndartuV from TOUT Amiga (*o you can turn yew 
COhlpurtar Oh 1a racehra massaoes. If you piererf H 
contains Ihe fealuree titled to »• H« and nddc: 

• Fiel specincalian leK/voiee iMiwe* meehine whn 
meSaame raotey, Urn* »tamplag, remote relrlevel o» 
massaons all operational in sEertd-eJorte rttoijft 

■ SlOrad fl^s*flga* acoofnpanled by vie, dale and 
caller- Hi where applicable. 

■ Snores anycamblnallani ol appmrimately 50 
minutes ol speech or 30 paae* Of feltas, 

• 'Follow Ma' alows 1hn 'Sola' la nabriy your mobev 
phone when vdu receive new nteeeatieel 

• QitHJp J. ClM* 1 and Class 2 FAX I14.4J 

' 2 sockets lor flash memory expansion mui: ,,li- ■. 
Manias Hioansian nplloiH; upto 33Mbrts 

• S backht runcbon keys. 11 lunction *.*x$ 



Dynalink a3.6K Ext&ma! Voice/Fax/Data Modem 
Dynafink SSK External Voice/Fax/rJata Modem 
PACE 56K External Voice/Fax/Data Modem 
PACE Solo' &6K External Voice/Fax/Data Modem 



£69.95 

fea.&s 

E1 29.95 

£169.95 



PACE 'Solo' wqiiires STFax Professional v3.3 tor tfis Indspandefit Operation Mode leatunes 



modem pack options 



£79.95 




Various money saving packs are available. These ere all based on the Dynalink 58K fflotitm, 
Packs based on the 33.SK or PACE 56K or PACE 'Solo" 56K modem available. 



PK01 
PK02 
PK03 
PK04 



£ 99.95 
E119.9S 
£129<&5 
£164,95 
£189,95 



aaPffirrniE 
S6K Modem & STFax 

56K Modem & NetConnect 

56K Modem & NetConnect & STFax 

56K Modem & NetConnect & Hypercoml 4 STFax 

PK05 56K Modem & NetConnect & Hypercom3Z & STFax 

DEDUCT £20 for a Dynalink 33.6K Modem (instead of the Dynalink 56K 

ADD £40 for a PACE 56K Modem {instead of the Dynalink 56K} 

ADD £100 for a PACE "Solo' 56K Modem {instead of the Dynalink 56K) 

* All packs COrflft wrth one month Iree connection lo Demon Internet ahfl/or UK Online 

• Choose between the CO or Floppy disk version of NetConnect wilh your modem pack 



h speed serial cards <3®I§S* mm £44.95 



Thn Hyp&cetn range of high-speed serial cards Oder your Amiga the lastest connection to the 
Internet, tor comms. and fax transfers. Available for Ihe Amiga tZOO, A1 £00 Tc-wsrs and lorna-ll/MI 

based machines (2orro version suitable for A1 SUO/H/S^OM or a A1200 lower). 

■■■fveBna^BBn^HNeBBBeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaBeeaeaBeaBBBBBBBESBBanBenBaievaa 

— ""■■r'»^nt«-e»l«llaTa»aTa»aTa»ata»aTa»aTr 'T~Taa«»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»Mi^:Tl 

rtypejEoml AiaOO 1 i *5QJ)W1 bp* hqhepood bulforad aonal port t»,*S 

hVlHrotvnQ AISOCT I s iUD.aDCIbps highspeed bulterHd seaal. 1 * SeOK pylai.rsAC parallel cart £79.44 

ttypeworngj: Znna-2V3 2 i «0.BO3t)|!« hlghapa»d (njltomd sonal, 1 x 500Kby1e*Js*c pefellel port t7*.» 

h'ypsrc.UT-1 ZonO-2/3 4. s 4EO,aO0bps highspeed buKered ienal porta CBS. 96 



miscellaneous software 




DELIVERY CHARGES 



Oval House, 113 Victoria Road, Darlington, DL1 5JH 

Tel : 01325 460116 ^^ 

Fax: 01325 460117 SW E3 

E-Mail: sales@actrve-net.oa.uk >■_ (r ^- 
http://www.active-net.co.ijk ■ tnti 



5'Wan> ■ tD.t* for OK delivery 

- f 1.D&ror EUckHiuerv 

- 1 1.50 World delivery 
H~rrart - t* tor S-3 day delivery 

- t'fi tor nasi day delivery 

- (call tor SatueeJay delfverv 



Hake cheques,'* 1 0. '9 payBW* lo Active 
1 and vend to the address 
listed opoosile We cart accapl oradH of 
debil card orders. For arty adWtional 
inlormartian call ust 



Various Othflr individual software titles are available. Th*S* tlllas may be Intensating to those nol 

wanting to purchase NetConnect vj. 

Miami - TCP/IP Stack Kx Om Amiga 

Scales Hjfwrb new MUI baeed wrjrh l»*rt«h raokacarmipl! 

Voyager hlert Genanstkni 

Microdot- II 

AmIRC 

AmFTP 

AmTalk 

X-Arc 

Conlaol Manager 

AmTeHnat + AntTOfm Package Deal 

• n BeeeejaM mftan IJ t'apor proourrs jm Rjuorr HM (henaafe! tor 5- 



[ internet informer/extra information 



SIM! unsune about connecting to In* Intemel? Wanl mpre mformatiDn? Confused by all the 
acronyms such as 'ISDN") Ccmiusad about the costs? Ask for our free infurntaimn pa«kl 



fly in sk 


RyFMa< 


C2B.0O 


E2S.00 


£19,00 


cie.oa 


£22.00 


£20.00 


E2C.K 


£13.00 


£20,00 


£18.00 


E20.0G 


£18.00 


£17.00 


E15.0D 


£16.00 


614,00 


tlZ.OO 


£10.00 


£20.00 


cia.oo 



/ 




wmm^^mmmmmm 



This month sees our new-look, Reviews 
Index update, and we say a tearful 
'au-revoir' to the Scala tutorial (sniff). 




Digital Art 




Andrew Kom with Part 2 of this art and illustration tutorial. Here 
he tells us a bit about image conversion. 

78 C Programming 

Jason Hulance gives you all the programming knowledge you can eat 
with fact after fact on; List Views, GadToolsSetFunction(j... 



82 Emulation 



Jason Compton attempts to get to grips with some of the obtacles 
of PC and Mae emulation. 



84 Surf's Up 






Aikhj C-Pifliraniniiii} fli 



Neil Both wick on the Newsgroup /website reactions to the World of 
Amiga bombshell. Net God waxes lyrical too, 



85 



Surf of the Month 



Cyberspace... the final frontier. Captain Bothwick beams himself up 
and around some interesting sites. 



86 Wired World 



File Transfer Protocol; if this means absolutely zilch to you then it's 
time you caught Up with this regular feature. 



88 Scala MM 3 00 



In our sixth and final part, John Kennedy tells us how with variables 
you can get a lot more use out of Scala. 



90 



Reviews Index 



This months Index takes on a new look, with the addition of some 
'hot' products recommended by the one and only CU Amiga. 



96 



QCt A 



Got a question on Amiga related topics? We have all the answers 
here. Well almost all. 



99 



A to Z 



John Kennedy shows off his newly acquired skill - the alphabet 
with another set of Amiga things, starting with 'L this month. 



106 Techno Tragedies 









rC 



Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Is it a car? Is it a motorbike? No it's a meta- 
morphic games console - or at least it was. 





Back Issues 

Missed out on an issue? Shame! All is not lost though, as you can probably find the 
offending article here. 

100 Backchat 

Comments, general information, criticism', suggestions. Here's a chance to get your name 
up there in print. 

1 03 Su bscript ions 

Life is fantastic when you take out subscription to CU Amiga, the UK's best selling Amiga 
magazine. Oh, joy of joys. 

104 Points of View 

With soap boxes underfoot, CU Amiga staff and contributors let the world know just what 
they think about stuff. Do not mess, 








TUTORIAL 




for producing small images easily 
uploaded to the internet quickly 
and cheaply, as witnessed by a 
those who took in the heady 
World of Amiga show experience 
via the internet aided by the CU 
Amiga webcam. For producing 
finished presentation images. 
even the best cameras leave a lit- 
tle to be desired. Sure, the El 200 
Olympus C1400L we looked at in 
the May issue produces pretty 
crisp output, but even in those 
rarefied heights, the end product 
still looks more like a holiday snap 
that an Ansel Adams photograph- 
ic masterpiece, With the cheaper 
cameras the story is even tougher 
- poor Jens quality, blurry images. 
Beyond hope? Not if you cheat. 

Cheat! 

Cheating is a great tradition in 
photography. The physical nature 
of traditional photographic- 
processes is just asking to be 
messed about with, from the sim 
pie things like printing for a higher 
contrast through more complex 
chemical manipulations such as 
toning or cross-processing colour 
films (putting slide film in the neg- 
ative film chemicals), a current 
mainstay of the fashion photogra- 
phy industry. With your picture in 
the digital domain, of course, the 
output from a digital camera is 
just begging to be messed with. 
You can alter pretty much every 
aspect of an image, warp it, trans- 
form it, change the colours totally 
or remove them altogether. Fine, 
if you just want to stick a picture 
of your dog on your homepage 
then fine, do it - just don't expect 
me to respect you in the morning. 

While the world of holiday 
snapshots and magazine covers 
has gone largely colour, black and 
white is still very widely used in 
photography. Many photogra- 
phers prefer black and white 
because they feel it gives a more 



c image than colour. This 
pretty s crewy y /h en you 
is a soJid 
ehind this. 

h a black and white image, 
ormation which he eye 
The eye 
y colour, as we use 
tify objects. One of 
the main purposes behind pho- 
tography is to show something in 
a way we do not normally see it. 
if you see a photograph of the sky 
in colour, your eye sees a lot of 
blue and your brain uses that as a 
clue to identify what you are see- 
ing. This aspect of our neuro-opti- 
cal development is a useful 
evolutionary trait as it allowed 
primitive man to take to his heels 
when he saw a yellow and white 
striped sabre tooth tiger rather 
than having to study it carefully to 
determine what it was. 

Con your brain 

Showing something in tone with- 
out colour makes it harder for our 1 - 
brain to make a quick identifica- 
tion, aind therefore lets us study 
the image undisturbed and hope- 
fully learn something more about 
it. One of the most famous photo- 
graphic movements was the fG4 
group, who concentrated on pre- 
senting mundane objects in a way 
that would encourage the viewer 
to see them as abstract objects 
as worthy of attention as any 
work of art: they found black and 
white work invaluable, 

The first two projects show how 
you can take a photograph and 
manipulate it by converting it to 
black and white, gaining maximum 
impact through tone, The third pro- 
ject is a bit more drastic. An inter- 
esting final image does not have to 
start with an interesting original 
image at all - the heavy duty 
manipulation available through 
image processing software makes 
it possible to transform an image 
utterly. For similar reasons to those 
outlined above for black and whits, 
some of the most effective colour 
photographs are those which 
utilise false colours, ■ 
Andrew Korn 



This month Andrew 
Korn tries to make 
something a little out 
of the ordinary from a 
digital camera. 




Grey scale conversion 

This first example shows how to do grayscale conversion properly ■ 
the key is not to trust what a 
grey scale converter gives you, 
it's bound to be less interesting 
than it could be. 

Picture 1: The original Image, a 
320 by 240 pixel digital photo- 
graph of a hand Pretty dull at 
the moment, harsh colours and 
grainy 

Picture 2: Image Studio will con- 
vert the image to greyscale for 
you, but a much better final 
image can be achieved. The 
greyscale may be an accurate 
tonal representation of the origi- 
nal, but it doesn't look as good 
as it could. 

Picture 3: A blur filter can 
remove some of the graininess 
inherent in digital and low light 

photography, while using Image 
studio's Focus convolve on the 
blurred image brings the crisp- 
ness back. Be careful which con- 
volves you use. Blur and 
Sharpen convolves are usually 
mirror image processes and they 
will not produce the best results. 



Picture 4: Using the balance 
window, the contrast, bright- 
ness and gamma of the image 
can be modified. Bringing the 
contrast up ensures the image 
has plenty at each end of the 
tonal spectrum, although using 
Image Studio's Dynamic range 
functions can ensure that your 
whites are while enough. 
Playing with the brightness and 
gamma controls ensure that the 
tonal range is not compromised 
too much by the contrast con- 
trols; gamma is the key to shifting 
the broadest area of tonal range 
into highiights or shadow, 
whichever is appropriate. In this 
case the shadows and darker mid 
tones have been emphasised- 
Picture 5: The final result! 







76 



TUTORIAL 



Let's get weird 

There is of course a lot you can do by getting away from the original 
colours of an image too. The following project was an attempt to use 
false colours to turn the face of my brother's cat into something alto- 
gether less worldly. 



Picture 10: Calling on the power of Image FX3.0, 




started of with the 
simplest of colour 
abstractions, nega- 
tive. The Solarise 
effect causes a 
pseudo negative 
based on rolling 
rather than flipping 
the colour range. 
By repeatedly 
using the negative 
effect followed by 
a solarise, the 
colours move fur- 
ther and further 
from the original 



Picture 12 Next, a little textural abstraction! The flowing Im* 
colour lent themselves to lines of texture, too. ImageFX's oi pa 
effect was used at a relatively low level, enough to roughen out the 

image ai 
impression of I 
f ^ AMU cat hairs to an impres- 

u 




set, while re1 



g the shapes and structures. 



Picture 13: The final result, an 
not very cat - like any more! 



Picture 1 1 : The result. Without the colours as a 
guide, the close cropping makes it difficult to 
recognise the feline origins of the image. 




The Software 

Image Studio: 

You can find a shareware version of this bar- 
gain-bucket image processing package on our 
CD this month in the magazine/Digital ART 
drawer. The full version with manual can be 
bought from LH Publishing, Telephone +44 
(0)1908 370230 

lmageFX3,0: 

This is the program I would recommend to 

anyone taking Image processing really serious- 
ly. Call Wizard developments +44 (0)181 303 
1800, Price is £179.99, There are also some 
very nice upgrade offers if you have an older 
version. 



In the next example, we modify the colour of an image before turning it into greyscale. While this sounds 
crazy at first, there is a good reason for it. 

Picture 6; The original picture. Cloudscapes are a common subject but rarely look so good in the final image 
Photographs rarely capture the luminance of a bright sky, but by turning to black and white you can often 
convey the luminance through tonal character. Alfred Stieglitz used black and white film for photographing 
clouds for his series "equivalents", stating that the black and white representations of the chaotic shapes of 
clouds was a way of achieving an artistic abstraction which allowed a very simple emotional connection with 
the image 

Picture 7: A simple greyscale conversion slightly tweaked for an improved tonal range, 

Picture 8: At an elementary level, a cloudscape contains blue skies and white clouds. If you darken all the 
blue, you can increase the contrast without removing any of the detail or tonal range in the white/grey high 
lights. This image is the result of tweaking the colours with an eye for the tonal range rather than the colours 
- looks a little like a sky from some Alien world right now. 

Picture 9: The re-coloured image is converted to grayscale, giving an end result with rather more subtlety 
and character than the original greyscale image. The scene is moodier without overwhelming the detail, and 
the contrast is higher without badly affecting the dynamic range. 




77 



TUTORIAL 






Amiga C Programming 



This month your friendly neighbourhood 
programmer, Jason Hulance, has a little 
dabble with GaclTools ListViews, and tin- 
kers around with SetFunction(). 




This month we're going 
to draw a line under 
Our HelloWorld paint 
program and call it a 
day. It's helped us 
cover an awful lot of topics, from 
basic windows right through to 
fractals and creating slave tasks. 
But it's no longer possible to 
squeeze interesting things into 
the framework of a paint pro- 
gram. Hopefully many of you have 
been inspired to start coding your 
own works of art, and hopefully 
they're not all paint programs, 
too! So what's up this month, 
then? A bit of naughty tinkering 
with the system, that's what. But 
first we must create a simple GUI 
for the tinkering program to use. 

GadTools revisited 

By now the use of GadTools 
should be fairly familiar. In fact, 
we've borrowed most of the first 
program, "setfQ.c", from the first 
GadTools example constructed 
many months ago. However, this 
time we're creating a ListView 
gadget, which is used to display a 
(vertically) scrolling list of items. 
The key parts of the code should 
need no introduction: 1) Open 
required libraries. 2) Get visual 



Example 1 



information for GadTools. 3) Start 
a GadTools gadget list. 4} Create a 
gadget and add it to the list, 5) 
Repeat 4) as necessary. 6) Open 
window and refresh gadgets. 7) 
Process IDCMP events, until the 
close gadget is clicked. 8) 
Cleanup: close window, free gad- 
gets, close libraries, The interest- 
ing new bit is the creation of a 
ListView gadget (see the extract 
in Example 1), For the moment 
we've (safely! omitted the most 
important tag (GTLV Labels), so 
the ListView will be empty, but 
everything else is in place. We've 
also slipped in a new way of 
specifying the window width and 
height when opening it: 
WAJnnerWidth and 
WAJnnerHeight. These are like •- 
the normal ways of doing it, 
except you give the internal width 
and height of the window (i.e., 
the size of the bit inside the bor- 
ders). So, the actual window will 
be a bit bigger than the dimen- 
sions you give since it will have a 
title bar and other decorations. 

Exec lists 

The ListView gadget displays the 
data held in an Exec list. This is 
something we've not really met 



Setup our first gadget */newgad , ng_TextAttr 
&topa2Font;newgad,rig_V r i3ualInfo = 

vinfojnewgad.ng_LeftEdgre - MYGAD_J,EFT + olfleft; 
newgad.ng_TopBdge = MYGAD^TOP + 

of ftop;newgad.ng_Width = 

KYGAD_WTDTH;newgad.ng_keight = KYGAD_HEIGHT f 

newgad,ncf_GadgetT^?;t = MYGAD_TEJETrnewgad.ng_Gad3etID 
- MYGAD_ID;newgad.ng_Flaga = 0;/* How create it 

and add it to our list VifCgod = 

CreateGadget [LISTVIEWJKIND, gad, fcnewgad, TAGJDCMB} ) 
createwindow(glist) ;else printf ("Errors could not 
create gadget (s) \n" i ; 



before, which is a little strange 

because it's one of the most 
common structures in the Amiga 
Operating System. Almost every- 
thing significant is held in some 
Exec list or other. From the list of 
open windows to the list of mes- 
sages waiting at a message port. 
It's also one of the aspects of the 
Amiga OS that is Object Oriented, 
but more on that some other 
day... Back to the ListView: it dis- 
plays the In Name field of the 
Node elements in the List. So we 
need to create a new Node for 
each thing that should be dis- 
played, and add each one to a 
List. Example 2 shows the 
changes needed to make the 
ListView use our own list. The 
crucial point is the initialisation of 
the list before it's used. This is 
done by Hie function NewListf) 
which comes from amiga.lib. A 
"struct List" must be setup in this 
way before it can be used as an 
Exec list. A node (i.e., a "struct 
Node"} can be added to this list 
using Add Head! J to add it to the 
front of the list, or AddTailf} to add 
it to the end. Both these opera- 
tions are very fast, since the Exec 
list is doubly-linked (it's just as 
easy to access the last element of 
the list as it is to access the first). 
So, what are we going to add to 
our list? This is where the 
naughty, tinkering code comes in. 
We're going to snoop on pro- 
grams running the OpenLibraryf) 
function, a bit like the wonderful 
SnOOpDOS program. 

Patching libraries 

The Amiga OS provides a function 
for replacing individual library 
functions: SetFunctionO. This is 
extremely dangerous to use, and 
even the most careful "hacking" 
can cause serious crashes, so this 
is the point where you're advised 
to proceed at your own risk. In 



any case, make sure you've save 
any important work before you 
start playing with the next few 
examples. The second example, 
"setfl.c", uses SetFunctionO 
directly. It's naughty in several 
ways: 1) it's not generally possi- 



Example 2 



mylist ; He-wList limylint) ;/ 
* Now Create it and add 
it to our list */if(liat- 
gad = 

CreateGadget (LISTVIEW_KIM 
D, listgad, inewgad, 
GTLV_Labels, km/list, 
TAG_OONE) ) 

create-Windaw(glist) jelse 
pr intf. { "Error: could not 
create gadget (3) \rt" > ; 



ble to use ordinary C functions to 
replace library functions, and 2: 
it's not 100% safe to use 
SetFunctionO at all. The examples 
on the disks have been construct- 
ed using StormC and they are 
pretty stable, given suitable condi- 
tions. This means that the compil- 
er should not generate code that 
corrupts significant registers. 
Using the large (far) data and 
code model in StormC seems to 
be OK. SAS/C is probably fairly 
safe, too, To do this kind of thing 
properly we really ought to use 
Assembly code for the replace- 
ment library function. Most C 
compilers support linking in 
object files from standard 
Assemblers, but this is beyond 
the scope of these tutorials. So, 
we'll stick with using just C for 
these small examples and keep 
our fingers crossed. Anyway, back 
to the code: the call to 
SetFunctionO needs the libra ry 
base of the library to be patched, 
together with the offset of the vic- 
tim function and the address of 








the replacement The 
QpenLibraryO function is in the 
Exec library, so we've supplied 
SysBase (which is defined in 
amiga.lib, so it's declared as 
"extern" in our source code). The 
offset of OpenLibraryf) is a much 
more difficult thing to find- V6u 
need to look at the '#pragma' 
entries in the files in the 
Include; pragmas directory. For the 
Exec library, the file in question is 
Include: pragmas/exec_pragm3S-h- 
This lists the functions in the Exec 
library in order of their offset, The 
number that increases by six 
(generally) is the offset, and for 
OpenLibraryi) this is "220". which 
is a hexadecimal number 
(although some compilers might 
use pragmas that specify offsets 
as decimal numbers}. In fact, the 
value we need to supply to 
SetFunetionj} is negative, i.e., "- 
0x228" in C speak. To be really 
complete and precise, it is actual- 
ly possible to get most library off- 
sets from amiga.lib. They're the 
exported constants with an "LVD" 
prefix. Unfortunately, not all the 
offsets can be found there, and in 
particular the one for 
OpenLibraryO is not present. 



Example 3 



Set up our semaphore 
and Lock i t 

* /Init Semaphore (&ready) ;0 
Lr-ainSemaphore (fcready} ;oi 
df = S e tFunc t ion (Sye Base, 
T .VO_OPENli 1 3RAR Y , 
(APTR)&newf ) ; /* Now do 
the real work 
*/ setup Window! ) ;SetFuncti 
on (SysBase, LVO_OFEKrLI- 
ERARY , ( APTR ) o ldf ) ,- 



VtorKbenCh Screen r | setftl 



Replacement 

OpenLibrary()SetFunction() is also 
used to reinstate the original 
library function. To this end, the 
result of a call to SetFunctionO 
returns the address of the 
replaced function, which can be 
used when you wish to reinstate 
it or if you want your new func 
tion to incorporate the old func- 
tion's effect. Example 3 shows 
the wrapper around setupWindow 
() in mainO- The presence of the 
semaphore is a protection mecha- 
nism, much like that used for the 
multitasking fractal code. Our 
replacement code for Open Library 
(|f will try to update the ListView 
gadget, which is only valid once 




4 Tltrewtl 

□I the first 
pre) iih: ■ 
Li*Wiew. 



the gadget exists and before it is 
removed. As other processes and 
tasks will be running our replace- 
ment code we need a way of pre- 
venting them doing so at 'bad' 
times. A semaphore is ideal for 
this job- Example 4 is the real 
meat. We're using some compiler- 
specific directives again ;like 

saveds") since this is pretty 
low-level stuff, The register argu- •- 
merits are the ones that are docu- 
mented for the OpenLibraryi) 
when it's called from Assembly, 
The first thing the code does is 
call the old version of OpenLibrary 
l) (or whatever had been patched 
in as this function!), if it's safe to 
update the list, we will then suc- 
cessfully hold the semaphore. It's 
worth noting at this point that any 
task or process could be running 
this code, so we shouldn't use 
DOS functions (like printffl or any 
other I/O) or allow the code to fall 
into a Wait{) (so we couldn't use 
ObtainSemaphoreO). Our real 
extra functionality is the 



Example 4 



typedef struct Library* ( *FUNCn register *1 

STRPTR name, register ,.d0 ULOWG vere^FTJNC oldf ,- struct 

Library* saveds newf (register al STRPTR name, 

register dO UTjOhG vers){ struct Library* result = 

oLdtfnsme, vers); /* Make sure the list/gadget is 
ready to be updated */ if {At tempt Semaphore <&ready) ) 
{ addNode(name, result}; 

Re lease Semaphored ready} ; } return result;} 



addNodei) call (see Example 5k 

This function allocates a new 
Mods, and allocates and formats 
the ln_Mame element- The memo- 
ry allocation is done with 
AllocVecO, which must be paired 
with FreeVeci) to deallocate the 
memory. The advantage of these 
functions over AllocfvlemO/ 
FreeMem() is that the size of the 
memory allocation does not need 
to be specified with FreeVeci I like 
it does with FreeMeml). The inter- 
esting call to sprintfi) is like the 
printfj) calls we've used before, 
but the result is stored in the 
string supplied as the first argu- 
ment, The various parts 
rm ean: "$ %8lx"The address of the 
resulting library base is formatted 
as an eight-digit hexadecimal 
number {with a leading "$")."%- 
20s"The name of the calling task 
(extracted from the Node in the 
result of FindTaskO) i$ J formatted 
to at least 20-characters and left- 
justified. "%s"The supplied library 
name is used in full- Hopefully 



this ought to explain the careful 
calculation for the amount of 
memory allocated for the 
In Name field. 



Exec list 



An Exac list is basically a 
doubly- 1 inked list. In a 
normal (singly) linked list 
each element (or Mode) In 
the list has a pointer to the 
next element, with a NULL 
meaning the end of the list 
has been reached. In a dou- 
bly-linked list, each Node 
also has a pointer to the 
previous element, and NULL 
is used to mean that the 
start of the list has been 
reached. 



Updating the 
ListView 

The remaining bit of interest is 
the update to the list and the 
ListView gadget. Before the list 
used by the gadget can be altered 
it must be removed from the gad- 
get. To do this we could attach a 
second, empty list, but that might 
cause the gadget to flicker when 
we eventually replace it with the 
updated list, Luckily, there's a 
nicer way to do this. GadTools 
allows the list to be specified as 
the special value "— 0", wit 
means "detach the list but don't 
update the display". So the first 



79 



TUTORIAL 




Workbench town 




Example 5 



StiaaiNitg in action 



void ftddNodei-char* name, struct Library* lib) ( Sti 
Node* node = AllocVec (eiseofitStrUQt Node) , 
HB0LFDBLXC | HEMF_CLEAR> ; if (node && name) [ 
struct Task* task = FindTask (NULL) ; char* taskname 
= task->tc_Node.ln_Name; int size =a 
Btr] enitaskname) ; if {size < 20) size = 20; 
size +■ 10+l + strlen(name)+i; if (node->ln_lfame = 
Al LocVe c ( 3 i ze , MEMF_PUBL IC ) } spr int f ( node- 

>ltt_wame, *$%08lx %-20s %s" , lib, 

Laskname, name); GT_SetGadgetAttrs flistgad, win, 
NULL , GTLV_Labe Is, -0 , 

TAG_DOWE ) : AddHead ( imy 1 i s t , node ) ; 
GT_SetGadgetAttT-K (list&ad, win, NULL, 
GTL,V_Labels, fcmylist, TAG_P0NE} ; J} 



Example 6 



void freeWodel struct Node* node) ( /■ Need to check 
node so that node->ln_Hame is valid */ if {node) ( 
FreeVec(node->ln_Name) ; FreeVec (node) ; ) }voiii 

freeList f, ) { struct Node* work; struct Node* next = 
itiyl iafc . lh_Head; while (next ->in^.Succ} { /* 

Remember current node *.■' work ■ next; /* Copy 

current ln_SUCC */ next = next->ln...Succ f /* H^w 

we can free the current node */ f reeNode (work) ; 

>}* 



call to GT SetGadgetAttrs() 
detaches the list nicely, then the 
new node can safely be added to 
the front of the list. Finally, the 
updated list can be reattached 
using GT_SetGadgetAttrsO- Once 
the ListView gadget is no longer 
needed, the list of nodes must be 
properly deallocated. Example 6 
shows the two functions used to 
walk the list and free the memory 
used by the nodes, Notice the 
great care taken to copy the 
ln_Succ pointer before a Node is 
deallocated, 

Does it crash? 

There are a number of reasons 
why the patching examples might 
cause your machine to crash. One 
of these might be various other 
system patches you have running 
on your machine. Another (more 
likely) reason is the interaction 
with the tasks and processes that 
call the replacement code (as stat- 
ed above, the patch ought to be 
written in pure Assembly). The 
third example, "setf2.c", tries to 
add a degree of safety to this 
patching, by using one of the 
'Safer SetFunction Patching' 
libraries, namely the patch- library 
by Stefan Fuchs. An archive 
should be on the disks, or else it's 



LVOAn 



LVO is a 'Library Vector 
Offset'. Every Amiga shared 
library has a tab la of vec- 
tors which call the library's 
functions. This means that 
(externally) the entry points 
for library functions remain 
the same, since they use 
this static table. The actual 
implementation of the 
library and the real location 
of the functions are free to 
change. This makes it easy 
for new versions of libraries 
to replace old ones trans- 
parently to the programs 
that use them. It also 
enables SatFunctJonfJ to do 
its naughty stuff. 



available from Aminet as 
u til/libs/ Pa tch LibVS. I ha . If this last 
example isn't more stable on your 
machine, try out the supplied 
examples in the F'atchLib archive. 
If they don't work either, it's more 
likely that it's your setup that's the 
problem.,, Next month we'll look 
at some more interesting bits of 
the Amiga Operating System. See 
you then! ■ 
Jason Hula nee 



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Keyboard Interface (plug in type) .. .£29.95 

Etowcr Flyer...... X69.9S 



IDE Hard Drives for At 500/2000 



Power Tower (1> 

inc. PC Keyboard. Keyboard interface Fascia plate 

for disk drive, and Mouse ,. ,, ,£149.95 

Otlic-r accessories for Power Tower please ring. 



Miscellaneous Products 



Controller 
-£179.00 Sturbuv 



Hard Drives plus Buddha IDE 

*.l C»I ■ 

Hard Drives plus Buddha IDB 

Controller 4.3 Gi^ ,.,,„ £l99Mli Starbtty 



IDE 2.5" Hard Drives for A600/1200 



All 2.5" Hard drives come formatted and installed with 
Workbench, including IDF,, cable, lovwi, tofrwOR and 
instructions, {fkmc (hack for availability) 

«h ■■ r% 

810Mb £89.00 Stsrfmy 




3.5" Hard Drives for A1 200/4000 



J.lGig £115.00 4,3Gig ..........-£155.00 

3.2Gig £125.00 *5.orjig , .£210.00 

Wc will partition and format Han.) drives and install 

Wi irkbcnch. *5 .OGig will fit and work Oft Amiga Computers 

contrary to warnings given. 

(Amiga. Format Gold Award winner August 1997) 
(Amiga format Gold Award for J.SGig January 199*) 



Memory 



4MbSimms -£10.00 flMb Sauna -£15.00 

l&MbSimms .£25,00 32Mb Simins £40.00 

32 Mb Single side/Blizzard £50.00 

Zip Rurn(sMitai>teJbrA3{XK}, Aifafvmtr, At-Bm 200$ & 
Qtnywwl every 2Mb . £)n !i<i 



1230-40MHi & FPU wirh Ifiinb plus MMU £99.00 

]240-25MHz& FPU with 16Mb £130.00 

1240-40MHI & FPU with 8Mb ....-£300.00 

l260456Mrh& FPU with 8mb -£340.00 



Philips moniroi to Amiga cable £8.00 

Prinrer cable £5.00 

PC Keyboard Adapitr (snkkr rv-fwi .£19,95 

PC Keyboard Adapter (plug in type) -£2995 

SCSI out with PSU ...'. .£49.00 

l!,„,r selector switch lor ASOO/2000 £10 00 

++pin i connector cable ,, £8.00 

44-pin 2 conoecccx i.ibk 

4l!|in 3 L-::;mcctor cable HOcm for 

CD-ROM & S.S" drive _£5.00 

AlfaQuarro 3i40pui [otjeffkee & IDE cables --£20.00 

171) tkjppy dUts (50) with disk boixs 

tttiludtty tKutiirvltiurird disk laiift.' £13,00 

['H') Soppy dUo ilOOl withdiik !x.u-s 

iiuivjinji mattifoieurtd rfss* iaifth £25.00 

3.5" Hard Drive kii for A6O0/1300 

+ Install SBpwan ,, , {_ 15.tKI 

Dkakbox to hold 10 discs £1,00 

Ansnal laoglc design and Dinosaur dciign „ £2.00 

2 in 1 Scanner/Mouse Pad 

Cwi bt used ma memo pad ....£3.00 

newer box PSU ,. .£49.00 

TurboPtinc (S PriniL-r EnbtoeefOmt Software £3°.00 

VOA .Vbjinjr ,.,.,, .£10.00 

Amiga Power Supply 4,5 amp £15.00 

Main Wiisitesi ,,,, ,, £2.00 

til-CJuarnj Imtu-red interface without cables 

o* miftWNC , £25.00 

ASOO-f LMb ram card £20.00 

A6U0+ 1Mb rani card , _£2Q.IM 

ROM Chip lot A500 or A600 V2.05 -£19.00 

CDROM Drives (Bare) For tniernal fitting. 
Requires intertace and sofrwafc 

IHE Sspeed _£J9.00 

IDE l&speed ^49.00 

IDE 24speed ■ 

ChatK pack AGA: 4 great games (on d»Ls) 

(The Chaos Engine, Syndicate, PirihufJ Fmtisics, and Nick 

Faldcs tioli'l . All Amiga h jnnJt Cji ild winner. £5 .00 

Audio Cabla Tor CD ROM's 

Stereo jack (3.5 mm) plug to 2 x RCA phono 

ptai0 1 .2 meter ksnp £5.00 

Audio mixer 2 x KtiA phono plugs to 2 % RCA 
phono plugs/sockets 1.3 metci lung . 
2k UltJA phu hi..; phij^ 11' -v !i( .1 pnono 

pJugi 1.2 mert-r long 

Multipass OCR Software 

suitable 1br nil scanners and direct scanning 

support for hand scanners by Migraph, 

t icUen Image, AlfaData and R'pv* ■. i ; it.00 



All prices include VAT. Please add £3.50 P&P for items under £30.00, £5.00 for items over £30.00, 
£8.00 P&P for CD ROMS & Hard Drives, £10.00 courier for next day. Tax Free Export Orders Welcome. 

1,. iUm Image accepts Mastercard, Vi.ia, Switch, Cheques fit Postal Dniers. E&OE. Prices subject to change without ntitiw. Gtuxls subiect to availabili™. Sr>ecitlLJtiiHis lubieei » chara. 



: iiiitiLf. Gtiods subject to avaiiabilirv. SpecitlLJtintu suhfs,-t to change nniboui nonce. 




Golden Image (UK) Ltd 

Unit 6n, Hallmark Trading Estate, Fourth Wav, Weniblev, Middx HA9 OLB 

Sales Hotline No: 0181 900 9291 tax: oisi 900 9281 

Hrrp;//w-vm, r ,Go]dciiimage,co-Mk Talking Pag«: 0800 ftfHJWMI 

Our standard terms jru! ccjrulitions apply - availaMe on mjunt. \Vr 4o oot supply 0*1 a trial baiLt. 

















nmm 


Wl'.Vl ItlMM 



Emulation 




Serious PC and Mac emulation throws up a number of sticky problems 
once you've got the basics sorted. A decent CPU, compatible drives and 
RAM for example... 



I can hear your first reaction 
to this article now. "Oh, no! 
Not another 'upgrade' arti- 
cle!" Well, yes an d n °i but 
mostly no. See, if you're 
going to get serious about serious 
Mac or PC emulation, there's a 
certain set of tools that will make 
your life much easier Just getting 
the emulator and operating sys- 
tem is only part of the battle - 
after that, you have to make it 
useful, and with a little careful 
investment and patience you can 
do just that. 



screen data in memory for extra 
speed, that can eat up quite a 
chunk as well. 

Back in the days when memo- 
ry actually represented a signifi- 
cant cash outlay, we would say 
"16MB in your Amiga is a func- 
tional minimum for Mac emula- 
tion." But memory prices have 
been cut in half more than once 
since then, and just getting off 
the ground with MacOS 8 
requires 32MB of memory. It can 
fake it with virtual memory, and 
despite the fact that Fusion will . 




Emulating mritfl Hits IMl PC* reiiirax a 111 Df RAM tnd brute force hflM Ik* CW * iMM ii I |Ml Jlirl 



Memory munchers 

We all know the AmigaOS is won- 
derfully frugal when it comes to 
memory usage. This was terrific 
news when memory was many, 
many times more expensive than 
it is today. Now, though, even 
Amiga users benefit from having 
memory to spare onhand, and it's 
even more handy if you're plan- 
ning to emulate PCs or Macs. 

For Mac emulators like 
Shapeshifter or Fusion, you typi- 
cally burn at least 4-5MB of RAM, 
minimum, just launching the 
things'. If you are buffering your 



handle VM under the MacOS, 
using VM full-time is a terrible 
idea, and it's best to stop before 
you start. 

If you stay away from MacOS 
S. and don't run millions of exten- 
sions on your Mac partition, you 
can get away easier, but big appli- 
cations like Microsoft Word and 
Adobe Photoshop still require sev- 
eral megs of memory just to 
launch without any projects run- 
ning. Then you load in a nice big 
TIFF and wham, you're out of 
memory again. For this reason, 
start considering 32MB of memo- 
ry in your Amiga to be a good 



functional level - add at least 
another 8 if you want to clear 
32MB on the Mac partition so you 
can comfortably run MacOS B. 
On the PC, things are a little 
tricker. Unlike the Mac, you don't 
usually get the luxury of just map- 
ping all the memory you'd like (at 
8 1:1 ratio) over to the emulator. 
For PC-Task, that is possible in 
theory, but it makes for very slow 
emulation.. For PCx, you hit a 
16MB wall that, in the present 
versions of PCx. cannot be 
worked around. All of those 16MB 
need to come from a single block 
of memory - on most accelerator 
boards, that means your SIMMs 
should be in matched pairs (if you 
have room for more than one). 

The way PC-Task works makes 
it very attractive to have as much 
memory as you can squeeze into 
the machine. The emulator uses 
"dynamic" techniques to convert 
blocks of PC -compatible x86 code 
into Amiga 680x0 code on the fly, 
Doing that saves you time in the 
long run, but the cost is available 
memory. The more memory you 
can give PC-Task to use for this 
code conversion, generally the 
faster your emulation will end up 
being. So. in general, the more 
memory you 
can throw at 
the prob- 
lem, the 
better. 

And that 
doesn't 
even begin 
to enter into 
how much 
memory 
you'll want 
to have 
handy to do 
serious 
emulation. If 
you stick 
with DOS 
based appli- 



CDfte 



Something to consider as the 
technology gets cheaper and 
cheaper are CD recordable^ 
(CDRs) If the amount of data 
is considerable, burning a CD 
on a 2X or 4X drive is not nec- 
essarily a ridiculous prospect. 
CDR media continues to drop 
in price, and at worst, you 
have a permanent backup of 
whatever you needed to trans- 
fer from one machine to anoth- 
er. CD rewritable* (CDRWJ 
don't have the problem of per- 
manence, but they are sub- 
stantially more expensive. 

While not everyone can justi- 
fy burning a CD whenever a 
single floppy won't do, the 
advantage to using a CDR to 
move data between platforms 
is that the PC, Mac, and Amiga 
will all read standard CD 
filesystems, without any 
encouragement. Keep in mind, 
however, that under old DOS 
some restrictions may show 
up if you don't have very good 
CD driver software - if you're 
unsure, it's best to use the 
8 + 3 filename limits when 
burning those CDs 




A. M cioth nftil PC Ml HfC whwari comes M CI im. In |«'tt inullY 
fit l CD -RDM inn tit Hit jhouliUi I h* a irtUtM. 



82 



re 



cations, having 8 to 16 megs 
available for the actual emulation 
should be very sufficient. If you 
plan to use Windows 3.1, 8MB is 
a real minimum - it's possible to 
run Win 3,1 in 4MB, but tends to 
be slow and tough to open many 
applications. And if you want to 
take the serious plunge and try . 
running Windows 95 under PC- 
Task 4, 16MB (and lot of 
patience) is required. 

Floppy appendages 

From installing the emulator oper- 
ating system for the first time to 
getting crucial files over to the 
right partition to exploring all the 
bargain bin PC and Mac apps you 
suddenly get access to. a floppy 
drive is indispensible. Of course, 
we all have them - but by and 
large. Amiga users still tend to 
have the double-density jobs 
Commodore and Escom shipped 
in most Amigas, These just won't 
cut it. 

PCs once upon a time were 
shipped with double-density flop- 
py drives, so there are some 
applications, including slightly 
older versions of DOS, that you 
might find and use on a regular 
Amiga floppy drive. But it didn't 
take very long for high density 
floppies to proliferate on the PC 
and most of what you'll come 
across requires a high-density 
drive, 

For Mac emulation, the situa- 
tion is even more clear cut. A 
standard double-density Amiga 
floppy can't read any double-den- 
sity Mac disks, period. The for- 
mat of the Mac 
double-density disk is 
about as custom as one 
can get -Apple actually 
changed the speed of 
rotation depending 
on the position of 
the head on the 
disk. Mercifully, 
Apple came to 
some sort gf 
sense and 
made 
their 
high- 
den- 
sity 
format 
far more con 
ventiona!. With only 
a little software help (like an emu- 
lator) an Amiga high-density flop- 
py drive can be made to read Mac 
high-density floppies like a pro. 
This is no problem if your 



Amiga came shipped with a 
Chinon high-density floppy in the 
first place. But in general the only- 
people this lucky were certain 
Amiga 3000 owners and all Amiga 
4000 (desktop) owners, along 
with the tiny group of original 
Commodore 4000T users. Barring 
that, it's time to look elsewhere, 
Some developers have found 
ways to modify other types of PC 
floppy to function as an Amiga 
high-density floppy drive (they're 
not exactly the same - the Amiga, 
due to limitations of the floppy 
controller, needs the drive to slow 
down in high-density mode), and 
those function pretty well as 
drop-in replacements for your 
original floppy drive. They can be 
a little pricey, however, The advan- 
tage is that they'll work exactly 
like your old Amiga floppy did. 
just with added support for 
Amiga, PC, and Mac high-density 
floppies. 

The other route to take is a 
Catweasel. This little device will 
allow you to plunk almost any PC 
high-density drive you can find 
into your Amiga and get access to 
all sorts of floppies, including 
high-density PC, Mac, and Amiga. 
In some cases, you can even 
make a modification to an E scorn 
A12QG floppy drive and use it. 
otherwise you'll have to seek out 
a cheap PC spare parts place and 
get one. Depending on how much 
you have to pay for the drive, this 
route can actually be cheaper 
than a dedicated Amiga high-den- 
sity drive. The inconvenience is 
that the 



Catweasel doesn't function exact- 
ly like conventional Amiga drives 
do - there's a different partition 
name for every single different 
type of disk, and its autobooting 
function leaves something 
to be desired. 

Those silvery 
things 

If you want to use modern 
PC or Mac software, you'll 
most likely be wanting 
more than just the high-density 



some interesting options Most 
removable media dewces 1Hk* Zip 

drives. Jaz drive.- ock just 

as well on a Mac or PC centroBer 
as on the Amiga. So. you can use. 
say a Zip disk to move a toac 
JPEGs off of one Mac onto your 
Shapeshifter partition for work in 
Photoshop, If you later want to 
take those over to a real PC. or 
maybe just a PC emulator parti- 
tion and don't want to muck 
about with the software tools to 
move the files, you can put them 




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A A met lETIjf gl lono cards alwirS kta, 
fells Inn l CPU esid with snm« tilra tat MM. 
Ihe unit usrikl *U-w is ' graphics, tlri. wkkk 
wilt xpati ip fur inflay and riMrtw HE* lin- 
er icrtti iilti: 



floppy. It hasn't just been Amiga 
companies who have discovered 
the tremendous economies of 
scale a CD-ROM provides, and 
you'll come across them by the 
bushelful for other platforms, 
Having a decent reliable CD-ROM 
is a must. PC emulator users 
should read and re-read the docu- 
mentation with your emulator 
before you sit down to try to 
make it work - you have to delve 
into the treacherous domain of 
CONFIG. SYS and 
AUTOEXEC.BAT, and while you 
can't "break" anything if you 
make a mistake, you can 
get frustrated in a big 
hurry if it's not work- 
ing right. Mac emu- 
lators can access 
your CD more 
directly, 
either 
through the 
SCSI bus (if it's 
SCSI, that is) or through 
the relevant device driver, 
and it's typically much easier to 
get up and running. 

If you need to move lots of 
data between your emulation sys- 
tem and either another Amiga or 
other real PCs or Macs, you have 



back on that Zip disk. Despite the 
hassles, if you stick with the old 
MS-DOS 8 1 3 filename limit (8 let- 
ters in the filename, three in the 
extension), you can be sure it will 
at least be readable on all three 
platforms. Sometimes least com- 
mon denominators are handy. 
When you're emulating, you 
have two (or more} computers 
fighting for the resources of one. 
You just have to be a good shep- 
herd and make sure that everyone 
has what they need to keep 
happy, and keep you productive. 
Besides, when you're emulating, 
your investments get spread 
around between more than one 
type of computer. That should be 
enough rationalization for most 
people, right? ■ 
Jason Campion 



Resources 



There's really only one place you 
naad to look for more Macintosh 
emulation information: 
wWW.emulation.net. 
It's a one-stop shopping venue 
for all of the emulators men- 
tioned in this article, and much 
more. 






I 



CGMMS 





Net God speaks 

If nothing else, the recent press 
releases and announcements 
from Amiga Inc, phases. Haage 
b Partner et a I have provided 
both the trolls and fanatics with 
plenty of material, which at least 
saves the first group the effort 
of making things up. 

It's been a long time since 
usenet was as good a spectator 
sport as it is now, although it 
does make finding intelligent life 
in some newsgroups even hard- 
er than it was before. 

I'm ell for attractive looting 
web pages, provided it doesn't 
get in the way of the content, 
but some sites are plain ludi- 
crous. J was looking for some 
hardware, at a company I'd been 
recommended. When I got to 
their home page it was entirely 
graphic buttons, With no text 
whatsoever. So I waited for the 
images to arrive from what was 
obviously a slow site, only to 
see that each was an image of 
some text! 

Following the links resulted 
in more pages in the same style, 
with different images and more 
waiting. It was all very pretty, 
but how many people want 
pretty instead of fast when they 
are sourcing electronic compo- 
nents 7 I doubt the webmaster 
had tried the site from anywhere 
but the local network. 

I did get what I needed, by 
going to another company with 
a more practical site. 



A 




Best Viewed With 

a Link 




84 




Surf's Up! 

Newsgroups and websites have been buzzing since 
the WOA announcement. Suddenly it seems the Net 
has acknowldeged the existence of the Amiga... 



Ten days before the World 
of Amiga, Amiga Inc stat- 
ed that they would be 
making a major 
announcement at the 
show. From that moment the news- 
groups and mailing lists went 
berserk. The increase in traffic was 
incredible. I turned off my Amiga 
the night before WOA to take it to 
the show. By the time I got there 
and got back online on Friday aftST- 
noon, there were 475 new postings 
to comp.sys.amiga.rnisc. The Team 
AMIGA mailing list showed a similar 
increase in traffic. The discussions 
spilled over into other newsgroups 
and mailing lists too. Once the 
announcement happened, it got 
even busier! 

Much of the discussion from the 
Amiga newsgroups appears on the 
CU Amiga CD each month, and is' 
available from DejaNewstoo, but 
mailing iists have generally been 
harder to read after the event. Now 
the Team AMIGA mailing list is avail- 
able as archives from the list server 
at http://www.thule.no/cgi- 
bin/lwgate The THOR mailing list is 
also available from here. 



& AMIGA $ 

TEMiMUiGAMAiLMaLIST 






m .r* *jp3**S 



■sr-SiiSWSii^i* ■**i*rv>B*ii' , .T5 , r' ■ ■ - - 

• . j-**iVi«™ ni : 41 ,— r+ ■«" !■■■ • '■ ■ . ■ V-TfiiiTT™* 



Opera 

Development on some of the three 
main Amiga browsers appears to 
have slowed recently, with only one 
of them releasing a major upgrade 
so far this year Now there is a new 
player entering the competition. Vou 
may remember the mention of 



Wmtkxizr-^ 







Opera in the April Surf's Up. Opera 
is a browser currently available for 
the PC that is being ported to other 
platforms by programmers specialis- 
ing in each of those platforms. At 
that time they were trying to gauge 
the demand for an Amiga version. 
They received a tremendous 
response and have now decided to 
go ahead with an Amiga version, to 
be developed by a UIC company, 
Ram jam Consultants ltd. 

"We are delighted to be involved 
in porting Opera to the Amiga. 
Opera has an Amiga 'feel' lo it even 
under Windows 95, so I'm confident 
it will make a high-quality Amiga 
application, and will offer a degree 
of commonality with Windows 95 
that few applications achieve", says 
Tim Corn ng ham of Ramjam. 

Opera has already gained quite a 
following among PC users because 
of its lightweight and efficient 
design, in comparison to its massive 
and often ponderous competitors, 
By having access to the develop- 
ment work of the PC team, Ramjam 
should be able to add Amiga sup- 
port for new features more quickly 
than the programmers of the other 
browsers, who have to do so much 
of the work themselves. 

The planned release date of the 
first Amiga version is December 98. 

Boot net survey 

Bootnet, a general computer news 

site, recently carried out a survey of 
reactions to the announcement of 
the new Amiga. Considering that 
this is not an Amiga site, so you 



would expect a somewhat 
less enthusiastic response 
than you would from an 
Amiga-specific site, the 
results are both surprising 
and encouraging. The 
question was "How do you 
feel about Gateway resus- 
J chafing the Amiga?" and 
readers had three choices. 
The current voting stands 
at: 



There is a God! 


want one 1 69% 


Um r Why/ 


23% 


No 


Ml 


DoeS this really 


mean that two-thirds 


of PC owners want one of the new 


Amigas ? ■ 




Neil Bothwick 






Contacts: 



Team Amiga Mailing list 
http : //wwwthule no/ cgi -bi n/ 

Iwgate Home page 
http://web.wt.net/~gpeake/ 

Opera 

Ramjam Consultants Ltd 

http://www.ramiam.u-net.com 



Bootnet 

Kttp : / /www. b ocrtnet. cdm/opifV 

ion. html 



Deja News 

http : // www.dejanews.CQ m 







Surf of the Month 

Once again, fluffy Neil Bothwick - like a duck taking to 
water - rummages for tit-bits in the sea of information. 



im 



ir>- 






When you want to 
buy or sell some- 
thing, you can't 
beat classified 
advertising, and 
the web adds the power of search 
engines to traditional classified ads. 
Exchange & Mart and Loot are two, 
well established, classified publica- 
tions that are now accessible via the 
web. and it really is-a lot easier to 
type a request into a search engine 
than it is to to pore over pages of 
small print classifieds, Naturally, if 
it's Amiga kit you are looking to buy 
or sell, you have to look on 
AmiBench 



m 





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■ E7f-™ 


■-SS*- 


» 




SJ* 


gn •.■■■■-- 



HrirOAin Hfilidays 




A2B Travel 



Sun, sea, sand and... 

It's the time of year when thoughts 
turn to sunning yourself on a beach, 
I've always thought the web was 
well suited to providing information 
and promotions for holidays, much 
better than watching page after 
page of teletext, only to forget to 
press Hold when you finally see 
something interesting, but there are 




Ei ,11 ii Sana 



very few travel companies taking 
advantage of it yet. A2B Travel pro- 
vides a wide ranging travel service, 
including useful information like 
exchange rates. 

Their site links to Bargain 
Hoi id ays, who provide the same 
sort of service in cut price holidays 
as the teletext advertisers, but in a 
more accessible way. 

I'll name that tune 
in one 

The collection of 6000+ CDID files 
on this month's CUCD is nothing in 
comparison with what is available 
from the CD Database. They 
slopped making the whole database 
available for download after it got 
bigger than 70MB! The database 
can be used in two ways. 

You can search for artist, track or 
CD names, as you would expect 
from a database, but this one has an 
extra feature. If you put a CD in the 
drive whilst online and running a 
suitable CO player, it will contact the 
database to retrieve information on 
that CD. There are no Amiga players 
listed on the site, but the relevant 
information about the database is 
freely available, so there's no 
reason why this couldn't be added 
to some of the many Amiga CD 
audio players. 

While searching for information 
on CDIDs, I came across a site that 
will appeal to music trivia "experts". 
CD*ID shows a small portion of a 
CD cover and asks you to name the 
artist and title. There are archives on 
the previous competitions too. 



< •» it 



<7^ 



ti- PM *wr*> l« Um*T *4 OP TTTW ban *m wrwr * M- tt ■ 



■ — n ^ - 




Way to go! 



The Darwin Awards are given, 

usually posthumously, to the individ- 
ualist who remove themselves from 
the gene pool in the most spectacu- 
lar fashion." There are several sites 
relating to these awards, but this is 
the official one. Since most of the 
stories relate to some- 
one's death, some peo- 
ple may find these sites 
somewhat tasteless, but 
others will find them very 
funny, The story of the 
guy who attached a solid 
rocket motor to his car, 
and ended up embedded 
in a cliff face 125 feet 
above the road, is now a 
classic. 

The real thing 

The link between com- 
puter enthusiasts and sci- 
ence fiction fans has' 



always been strong, just look at the 
number of Star Trek, Star Wars and 
Babylon 5 web sites. You can't beat 
the real thing though, 'NASA have a 
comprehensive web site providing 
up to date information on current 
and future missions, with a large 
selection of pictures. 

Web sites on how to make your 
own web site have always been 
popular. The Brain Soup site is basi- 
cally a collection of background tex- 
tures that could be used for web 
page or Workbench backdrops, pre- 
sented in a clear and easy to use 
way. Jeffrey Zeldman's site pro- 
vides a wider range of resources. As 
well as collections of icons and 
backgrounds, this site provides tuto- 
rial and help information on web site 
authoring and, unlike the previous 
site, it is updated very frequently. 9 
Neil Bothwick 




En change it Mart 



URLs 


Loot 


http : .7 www. 1 oot . co . u k 


Exchange & Mart 


http : // www.exch a ngaa nd mart.co . u k 


AmiBench 


htt p : ,' ,'thu nd er sto rms, org / Am iBen ch 


Brain Soup 


htt p : / / www. skoard v, d unon ,ca .u k/bsoup 


Jeffrey Zeldman 


http : //www. zeldm a n . corn 


A2B Travel 


http : //www. aZbtra vel com 


Bargain Holidays 


http : / / toargai nho iiday s . co m 


CDDB 


http : /.'www cddb.com 


CD 'ID 


http ; //www.bfoot.com/users/barefoot/edid.htrnJ 


The Darwin Awards 


http:. '/ www.officialdarwinawards.com 


NASA 


http : //www, nasa . gov 


CU Amiga Online 


http://www.cu-amiga.co.uk 



85 







Wired W 



FTP programs don't have to be 
all file lists and buttons. FTPMount 
is so easy to use you could forget 
it's there. 



\ 



FTP or File Transfer 
Protocol, is the standard 
way we exchange files 
with other computers on 
the Internet Generally we 
use either a dedicated FTP program, 
like AmFTP or AmiFTP or a web 
browser. But. i$ this realty the best 
way to do things? All an FTP pro- 
gram does is download a copy of a 
file from a remote machine and save 
it to your hard drive. It doesn't let 
you do anything with the file you've 
downloaded. 

So using files from the Internet is 
15 two stage process, yog need one 
program to download a file and 
another to actually use it. Wouldn't 
life be much simpler if the program 
that used the file could also down- 
load it? Just think how much time 
and trouble it would save if you 
could import a file from the pix 
directories of Aminet straight into 
ImageFX, or upload that master- 
piece of a web site you've just creat- 
ed straight onto your ISP's web 
server 

Ami net on your 
Workbench? 

The good news is that this is possi- 
ble, and has been for several years, 
using a little-mentioned program 

called FTPMount. FTPMount does 
just what it says, it mounts a device 
called FTP:, on your system, which 
you can then use to access just 
about any FTP site from any pro- 
gram, including Workbench. 
FTPMount is in the Wired World 
drawer of this month's cover CD. 
There is an installer script, but man- 
ual installation is simply a matter of 
copying the FTPMount directory to 
your hard drive, moving the con- 
tents of the DQSDrivers drawer to 
SYS; Storage/DOS Drivers and 
assigning FTPMountDir: to the 
FTPMount directory, 

Once you've installed FTPMount. 
go online, open a shell and type 

multiview 




FT P: uk . a m i n ei net/a m 1 net/RF. CF NT 

;ind you will see the list of recent 
uploads to Aminet displayed on 
your Workbench. 

This is a start, but FTPMount is 
capable of much more than this. 
Instead of typing in the full address 
of a site and the path to the directo- 
ry you need, you can set up an alias 
to do it air for you. In FTPMountdir 
Hosts you will find a number of 
drawers and icons, each drawer 
represents a site (or host), with con- 
figuration information held in the 
icon s tooltypes. Select one of the 
drawers from Workbench, make a 
copy and rename it to "Amine; ". 

Then select Information from the 
icons menu of Workbench and edit 
the tooltypes so they look like the 
screen grab. Now FTP:Aminet will 
take you straight to the main direc- 
tory or the UK Aminet mirror, You 
could set up several icons for your 
favourite Aminet directories. If you 
then open the drawer on 
Workbench and select "View by 
Date" and "Show All" you will be 
able to see any new uploads to that 
directory immediately. Since this is 
a Workbench icon, you can snap- 
shot it so this becomes the default 
display tor that site. 

Maintaining a web site 

FTPMount is not restricted to sites 
that accept anonymous logins, you 
can also configure hosts to access 



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password protected servers, such 
as your web space. The USER and 
PASSWORD tooltypes allow you to 
log into any site that you have per- 
mission to access. There is also a 
new PASSWORDCRYPT tooltype 
that lets you store your password in 
encrypted form. This is more secure 
than saving the password as plain 
text, that anyone can read, but it 
may be wise to keep a copy of the 
password somewhere safe in case 
you forget it. 

Once t web site gets bigger than 
a few files in a single directory, 
keeping it updated from the master 
copy on your hard drive can become 
a major chore. FTPMount makes it 
much easier, especially if combined 
with other programs Simply typing 

Copy Work: My Website/*? 
FTP:MyWebSite Al I 

will copy the entire contents of 
your web site from youf hard drive 
to your ISP's web server, provided 
you have created a suitable host for 
FTPMount. Updating it takes a little 
more work, but not much. 

There is a neat little backup pro- 
gram called FBack, accompanied by 
FMirror, that makes maintenance of 
even the most complex of web sites 
a doddle. FBack works by checking 
the archive bits of all the files in it's 
Source path., and copying any files 
that don't have the archive bit set to 
the destination path, setting the 
archive bit of the source frte in the 







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process. Archive bits are a feature of 
Amiga DOS that allow software to 
keep track Of files that have heen 
modified, you can see them in the 
output of the List command, or in 
most directory utilities. Whenever 
you modify a tile, it's archive bit is 
cleared, so your backup program 
knows it has been changed since 
the fast backup, without needing to 
know the date of thai backup. So 
FBack will simply copy all files that 
have been modified since it was last 
run. By setting up a host in 
FTPMount for your website, and 



Web cameras 



There are many other things 
you can do with FTPMount. If 
you looked at CU Amiga Online 
during the World of Amiga, you 
may have seen our webcam. 
This was based on a simple 
script that took a directory of 
photos taken with a digital 
camera and uploaded them to 
the web site at regular inter- 
vals, using FTPMount. You 
could just as easily set up a live 
webcam using either a video 
camera with frame grabber Or a 
digital camera. Set it up to grab 
a picture at regular intervals 
and save it as 
FTP: My WebSita /webcam .jpg, 



86 



i nnn Amim er) 





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Comment: [ 


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ROOT-/pub/aminet 


! 




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Last Changed: 

Location: 

Comment: 

loo I Types: 

i^ew 



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using that as the destination in 
FBack, you can quickly and easily 
keep your site up to date, whether it 
is a small collection of homepages 
or a large commercial site. 

Clear out the 
deadwood 

When you've been running a web 
site for a while, you find you accu- 
mulate all sorts of files that are no 
longer used, such aa old Images, 
You don't want to spend online time 
trawling though your web site look- 
ing for files that are no longer need- 
ed, and you don't need to, FBack 
comes with a companion program 
called FMirror. This does the oppo- 
site of FBack, it checks the source 
path for files that do not exist on the 
destination path and deletes them. 

In this case you set trie source 
path to the remote server via 
FTPMount and the destination to 
your local copy of your web site. So 
you first run FBack to copy across 
any updated files, and then run 
FMirror to remove any outdated 
files. The screen grab? show the 
GUIs used for each program, but 
they can also be run from the shell, 
or a script. All you need is a two line 
AmigaDOS script like this: 

FBack FROM WoricMyWebSite/ 
TO FTP:WyvVebSite/ ALL NOCOM- 
MENT FMirror FROM 
FTP:MyWebSite;' TO / 

Work: MyWebSite/ ALL 

Call it UpdatevVWW and either 
type it in a shell or attach it to a 
Dock button, You can now update 
your whole web site with a single 
command. One word of warning, 
some web servers also store system 
configuration files within your web 
space. If this is the case you will 
need to keep a copy of those on 
your hard drrve to prevent FMirror 
deleting them. 



Uploading web pages 

The procedure for uploading web 
pages to your homepage space 
varies according to your ISP With 
some you have to request access to 
your space before you can use it, 
whereas Wirenet and Demon make 
it available from the day you open 
your account. 

Generally you need three pieces 
of information to log in to your web 
space; the upload address, a login 
name and a oassword, The login 
name and password are usually the 
same as you use when dialing in, 
the format of tfie upload address 
varies according to your ISP These 
are the addresses for several UK 
ISPs. 

Wirenet: www.yourhostname.u- 
net.com j using your own hostname) 

Demon: 
homepages.demon.co.uk 

Enterprise: 
h omepages.ente rprise, net 

Netcom: www.netcomuk.co.uk 



The Opus alternative 



Users of Directory Opus have a 
facility similar to FTPMount 
built in. OpusFTP lets you dis- 
play the contents of an FTP site 
in a lister and perform most of 
the operations you would on a 
lister containing a local directo- 
ry, It's not as suitable for using 
in a shell, which is why I used 
FTPMount for the WOAcam, 
but it makes up for this with 
many other features not pre- 
sent in FTPMount. Any existing 
user of DOpus Magellan should 
have a good look at the fea- 
tures available with OpusFTP, 
some of which are available on 
very few FTP programs on any 
platform. 



UK Online: web.ukonline.co.uk 

Globalnet: www, users. global* 
net.co.uk {copy files to public html 
directory) 

Zetnet: 
www. u sers.zetnet co . uk 

Note that even though some of 
these are www. addresses, you still 
connect to them with an FTP pro- 
gram. Most web servers run on 
Unix, which has a case-sensitive file 
system. This means that you need 
to be careful with the spelling ol 
and file names If you have a page 
called All About My Dog, htm I and a 
link of <a 

href="al|aboutmydog.htmr> ihe 
link will work fine when testing it on 
your Amiga, but will fail when 
uploaded to a Unix server, smce 



these are considered to be two 
completely different file names. 
The safest option is to use lower 
case everywhere to avoid the 
embarrassment of people complain- 
ing about broken links and images 
that don't disptay, ■ 
Neil Both wick 
(c ucd @wirenet . co . u kj 



On the CD 



FTPMount - including the 
recent update 
FBack - with FMirror 
Argue - needed by FBackGUI 
WOAcam.reKK - the script used 
at World of Amiga 



1 



-amiga.cQ.Uf.. 



7] F:[0/8 



r p-ic 



MiDMSIHI 



Name 



Size 




nmorth 512 

pd 512 

pov 

ste 1 

subs 

suf 

change log, htm I 13722 

edit.htfil 7765 

home, ht nil 5754 

httpd-pid 4 

index- htm I 5754 
fri lstatus.htm I 161 

nav.htmL 5604 

woacam. jpg 29343 



11- Jan -98 

Tod-. 

29-J- 

26 -Mar -98 

Wednesday 
Wednesday 
68 -May -98 

ig-Feb-sa 

68 -May -98 
11 -May -98 
ee-Hay-98 
Tuesday 



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i8a 
08p 

7:15: 99p 

1:43:00p 
12:00:09a 
9:46:00a 
5: i 

18:32:8Qp 
10:32:B0p 
7:33:08p 
7:23:66p 
7:39:6Bp 
3:42:60p 
7:3S:60p 
10:54:0Bp 






-rwed 
-rw-d 
-rwed 
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87 



TUTORIAL 



■H 



■■■ 



wmmmmammmmmmmm 




Scala MM300 




With the use of variables you can get a whole lot more out of 
Scala than just simple presentation sequences. John Kennedy 
brings you the sixth and final installment of this tutorial. 



In many ways, Scala is a 
simplified programming 
language. It can display things 
on-screen, react to input from 
the user, and it can even per 
form calculations. 

It's this ability of Scala to think 
for itself that we'll be looking at this 
month. Adding some degree of 
intelligence to your Scala scripts 
can make them considerably more 
interesting. If, like me, you happen 
to use Scala to create shop-windDw 
displays then you can use these 
techniques to Create roiling demos 
which perform differently each time 
- making them much mare 
interesting and extending their use- 
ful life 

What is a variable? 

A variable is a location in memory 
which can be used to store a value, 
as any programmer will tell you. 
Scala can use its variables to keep 
track of things, such as number of 
times a page has been displayed. 

Scala can test the value currently 
stored in a variable, and act on it by 
jumping to a specific page in the 
script; this makes it possible to cre- 
ate loops for example. Scala can 
also display the contents of the van* 
able as part of a page: which greatly 
increases the flexibility of your 
script. 

First of all, we need to see where 
the variables can be entered. In 
order to see any action which might 
involve a variable, you'll first have to 
edit the layout screen slightly to 
make them visible. We did a similar 
thing to make it possible to add 
sounds to pages. 

All you need to is click on the 
System button from the menu lay- 
out screen, and click the configura- 
tion button! until you get to shuffle 
the Scala EX settings. Now drag the 
Variables event button closer to the 
top. so that when you return to the 
layout, there will be a column for 
Variables, 




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From this window here you can do 
three main things: 

1. You can define the name and 
contents of the variable, by entering 
it in the Set box. You can use a wide 
selection of names, so try and pick 
something which will help you 
remember what it does. "Age" is 
more helpful than "X" for example. 
If this is the first time the variable is 
being used, it's a good idea to set it 
to an initial value, Notice the digit 1 
in the box. After you enter your first 
variable, you can click on the little 
arrows which appear and add more, 
The number helps you keep track. 
You can also change an existing vari- 
able, by using an operator such as 
plus or minus. 

2. You can act on the value of a 
variable, by entering a statement in 
the "IF" box. For example, you could 
test if the age is over 2T, using a 
command such as "age > 21". You 
can also test for "less than", and 
"equals to", Again, it's possible to 
enter multiple IF statements using 
the little arrows which appear. 

3, Finally you can do something 
if the condition defined above is 
met, You can't do anything dramatic, 
but you can select a page to jump 
to. By carefully defining your pages. 



you can therefore 
make your script 
act in totally dif- 
ferent ways 
depending on the 
value of the 
variable. 

Now let's look at 
how we can use variables to create 
some scripts which appear to be 
smarter than usual. 



Different types 



The variables you define in 
Scale can store two different 
types of data: tort (known as 
string variables) and numbers 
(known as integer variables). 
You don't have to define them 
in a special way, Scala will work 
-out the type by looking at the 
first value you set it to. 

When it comes to displaying 
the contents of variables, noth- 
ing could be simpler, All you 
need to do is define your text 
appearing on the screen as nor- 
mal, but precede the variable 
name with an exclamation 
mark. For example, if you have a 
variable called "name", then 
when you include the line "My 
name is; Inama" on a page, 
Scala will substitute the name 
when the script is run, 



My Name is ! name 




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EoirtEBls ire iidiMjtf iastaid 



Example project: 
Countdown Timer 

Many videos and demos start with a 
countdown tim&r, so let's create one 
to start our Scala script with. 
Remember, once you've saved a 
script you can still load it back into 
another project and use it again. 
Building up a library of useful scripts 
is the best way to tackle any large 
Scala project. 

Let's say we want our count- 
down script to start at 10, and 
countdown to 1 . The easiest way to 
create a countdown without scripts 
is to create a page for each number. 
This is a tittle tedious to do. and if 
you wanted to countdown from 100 
instead, it gets silly A better way is 
to use a variable to keep track of the 
current count value. Here's how: 

1 . Define a page which does 
nothing but contain a variable event. 

The variable event will use the Set 
box to create a variable called 
"count" which we will give the value 
10. This is the first value which we 
will display. Switch off any page 
delay. ▼ 




2. Next we create a new page 

which will display the variable. I've 
used a large font here, the variable 
name starts with a "!" mark. In fact, 
the variable name is so big it's gone 
off the side of the page. This does- 
n't matter. Set the page delay to one 
second. ▼ 



Countdown 






COUN 




3, Now for the clever part. On 
the third paqe we define a new vari- 
able event We use all three parts, in 
that first we subtract one from the 
variable, then we test if it is still 
greater than one and finally we loop 
back to the display page. Again, the 
pause setting is turned off. ▼ 






4, The last page isn't needed, 
it's simply to demonstrate that the 
loop has finished, If you want your 
Countdown to do something more 
exotic, why not include a 25 frame 
animation of a circle spinning 
aroynd, Or filling with grey. Why 25 
frames? Because that will take a 
second to replay ▼ 




Example project: 
A Quiz 

As Scala can keep track of numbers 
using variables, it can also keep 
track of things like scores: which 
means it's possible to use it to write 
simple games. With a little planning 
and ingenuity you could use Scala to 
create an adventure game if you 
wanted, but here we'll stick with the 
beginnings of a quij program, 

1. Once again, we start our 
script by creating and initialising a 
variable, in fact, this time we'll use 
two variables and set both to zero to 
start with. The names are 
"Question" (to keep track of the cur- 
rent question) and "Score" (to keep 
track of the player's score). ▼ 



y 




get the first question page just right, 
and then copy and paste it to add 
the others. Here's the layout of the 
question page. Notice how right 
away we use one of the variables in 
the top left of the screen. ▼ 






that there is no entry in the Variables 
box. As it's the wrong answer, the 

player won't get any points, If you 
were being harsh, you might want 
to subtract points for a wrong 
answer. 



CU Amiga is the 
best Amiga Magazin 
money can buy. 



3. The code which loots after 
the buttons is where we'll build-in 
the logic which checks for the right 
answer You should know how to 
define an object as a button from a 
previous Scala tutorial. 

This is the code for the correct 
answer: in the Variable box, it adds 
one to the score. The Goto; box is 
set to Next, so the page automati- 
cally moves on. ▼ 



5. From the 
List Editor 
For theques 
tion page. I 
made sure 
that all the 
elements 
appeared in 
the nght 
order. The 
List Editor is 
also a great 
place for 
selecting the 
Wipes for 
each ele- 
ment; the buttons zoom in, whereas 
the text just appears down the 
screen. ▼ 



tion to zero, it has one added to it 

before it's displayed. 

7. Now you can copy the ques- 
tion page for each question in your 
quiz. Click on the number ot the 
page, and then the Copy button to 
duplicate it. You can then edit the 
button, changing the text as neces- 
sary. Remember also to change the 
button which increments the score 
to reflect the correct answer. ▼ 





8. Finally we get to the 
end Of the quiz. The final 
page tells the user their 
score, and also the num- 
ber of questions asked. 
You could even use Scala 
to calculate the percent- 
age, but I'll leave that as 
an exercise for you. ▼ 
John Kennedy 



6 One more thing 
is needed to finish 
off the question 
page: we need to 
increment the ques- 
tion number variable. 
This is done back at 
the main layout 
page, after a click on 
the Variable column 
button. ▼ 



You scored: 'Score out ot (Question 



4. This is the code for the button 

which leads to the wrong answer. 
You can see it's identical, except ▼ 



CU Amiga is 
best Amiga Mac 
money can b 




2. Now we can define the ques- 
tions. The>best way to do this is to 




The code here is 
executed before the 
page is displayed:, 
so even though we 
initialise the ques- 



And finally... 



That concludes our Scala 
MM 300 series, 
If a printed manual is made 
available you cart be sure to 
hear about it first in CU 
AMIGA. For now address 
Scala queries to the usual 
Q&A address. 



89 



REVIEWS INDEX 



Reviews Index 



Hera it is: the long-awaited, revamped Reviews Index. The 
index now contains a summary of product reviews from 
only the previous four issues of CU, sorted by issue and 
then alphabetically Hopefully, you will find this a bit easier to use, 
New to this page is the CU Editorial team's list of recommended 
products. If you don't own any of these, do yourself a favour and 
buy one immediately. 
As usual, if you have amy comments or 
suggestions about this page, please 
contact us. 







Hot Products ' 


JILL 




Title 


Comment 






Aminet Sets 


The must-have shareware archive, ^^AiaHa*^ 




Draw Studio 


Amiga's best structured art/illustration package. 




Elastic Dreams 


Swirly picture manipulation hi- jinks 




I Epson Stylus Photo 


For photo-realistic hardcopy. 




I Genetic Species 


A damn fine game. 




f ImageFX 3,0 


THE professional image processing software. 


| Miami 3.0 


Makes jacking into the 'net so easy. 




OctaMED Sound Studio 


What? StUI using Octamed 67 Get this now! 




Opus Magellan 


We love this Workbench replaeemem>QS3.5? 




Pace 56K Voice Modem 


The Rolls Royce of Modems. 




Pagestream 3.3 


You want to lay out pages? Look mo further. 




PhaseS PowerUp cards 


PowerUp says H all. 




Power Scan Magic 


Throw away that Microvitec monitor. 


/ 


Power Tower 


The best place to re-house your 1200. 




PPairrt 7.1 


The best pixel paint package on any platform. 




Quake 


Another damn fine game. 


Siamese RTG 


Splice your PC to your Amiga. 


SouncfProbe 


Truly awesome sample manipulation package. 


Turbo Print 6 


Must-have print enhancement package. 


VoyagerNG 2.95 


Surf the web in style, 


Wizard Mouse 
Wordworth 7 


The rodent of choice in the CU offices. 


The top digital quill on the Amiga. 


CU Amiga Magazine 


Of course 



Reviews Index 


Title Type Comment Score 


April 98 


20,000 Web Graphics 


Graphics (Clipartj 


Extensive but unstructured collection of clip art 


m% 


Aminet 23 


Various 


More of the latest software from the Aminet 


B8% 


D Paint 5 CD 


Graphics {Paint) 


A re -release of an old master 


83% 


Font machine 


DTV {Fonts) 


Makes creating colour fonts easy 


90% 


Siamese RTG 2.5 


Network RTG package 


The ultimate PC and Amiga integration 


92% 


Simon the Sorcerer 


Adventure game 


This re -release has great graphics, humour and puzzles 


90% 


Speccy CI a 55i x '98 


Emulation 


Collection of games for your Speccy or 64 emulator 


89% 


ST Fax Professional 


Comms (Fax) 


An excellent program for home or small business use 


94% 


Theme Par* 


Strategy game 


A slightly aged, but addictive re-release 


92% 


Wingnuts 


Flight sim 


Tongue in cheek, good graphics, poor gameplay 


67% 


X-DVE 301 


DTV (Effects) 


Fast and flexible video effects package 


92% 



90 



REVIEWS INDEX 



Reviews Index 





Title 


Type 


Comment |_ 


Score | 


kw 1 1 


Mav98 






ADescent 


3D game 


Good but needs work to become the ultimate Descent 


82% 


^w 


ArtStudio Pro 


Graphics (cataloguer) 


Under-delivers on features, pales before the competition 


69% 




Blizzard PPC 040/603 


Accelerator (A120Q) 


The essential upgrade for all A1200 users 


94% 


kill 


Descent 


3D game 


Plays well but still has a few glitches 


80% 


'V 


Dynamode Modem 


Modem 


Spaed is what matters and this modem doesn't deliver 


75% 




Elastic Dreams 


Graphics (processor) 


Not a rival for ImageFX but makes graphics great fun 


82% 




Fusion 3.1 


Emulation (Mac) 


Fusion is tops in Mac emulation 


92% 




Kids Rule OK II 


Kids game 


A compilation of three very poor games 


40% 




Pace 56 Modem 


Modem 


A high quality modem 


92% 




Picture Manager Pro 5 


Graphics (cataloguer) 


Impressive as a cataloguer and an image processor 


90% 




Playdays 


Kids game 


Too much work and too little fun 


75% 




PI ay days Paint 


Kids game 


Great fun for kids - highly recommended 


92% 


— 




Word worth 7 


Word processor 


Simply brilliant 


93% 


— 












t 




Title 


Type 


Comment I 


Score | 


— 


June 98 




— 


AWeb-ll 3.0 


Comms (browser) 


The first Amiga browser with Javascript 


90% 


— 


ImageFX 3,0 


Graphics {paint/ process} 


The best image processor goes from strength to strength 


95% 


— 


Malice (for Quake] 


3D game 


Utterly brilliant, worth buying quake for alone 


95% 




MasterlSO V2 


CD-RW software 


A great all round package 


88% 


n. 






Micronik External Scan Doubler 


Scan Doubler 


Well deserving of the Boing Ball 


93% 




Micronik Internal Scan Doubler 


Scan Doubler 


An inexpensive route to a high quality display 


88% 




Power Digital Gamers 


Digital Camera 


Easy to use, fun, and cheap - but results don't impress 


Bt% 


)»■ 


Quake 


3D game 


The ultimate in atmospheric shoot em up action 


95% 




Sirius Genlock 


Genlock 


Superlative video output - at a price 


90% 




The Labyrinth of Time 


Adventure game 


Some design flaws, but an engaging game nonetheless 


78% 




Turboprint 6 


Printer drivers 


An essential companion to any modern printer 


93% 




TV-Amazing 


TV Tuner 


Good, but not ideally suited (or Amiga use 


75% | 


















Title 


Type 


Comment 


Score 




July 98 




— 


Amiga Forever 


Amiga Emulator 


Very workable Amiga emulation 


87% 


V 1 


Am(netZ4 


Various 


The latest downloads from the 'net 


89% 






Aminet Set 6 


Various 


A gargantuan collection of software 


90% 




Eyetech single-slot Zorro 


Expansion (A1200) 


Functional, but inelegant and expensive 


78% 

— 1 




EZ-PC Tower 


Tower system 


An excellent, all-ln*one Siamese system 


89% 






Flyin' High Patch/Data Disk 


Racing game 


Bug fixes and extra courses to make Flyin' High playable 


74% 








Pyromania 


DTV (clips) 


A great package for professional DTV 


92% 








Quake: Mission Pack 1 


3D game 


A great way to get more out of Quake 


87% 








Shrak for Quake 


3D game 


Probably one of the finest add-ons for Quake 


88% 









Tornado 3D 


Graphics (3D) 


Flawed, but exciting enough to risk 


87% 




Virtual Karting 2 


Racing game 


A sequel that should never have happened 


40% 








Wheels On Fire 


Racing game 


A fun game, marred by system unfriendliness 


50% 








Yamaha MU10 


Sound card (MIDI) 


Good, but not as flexible as a proper sound card 


65% 







91 




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-| Name: 
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Visit us on the Web! - http://www.firstcom.demon.co.uk/ 

D 2 E . L Z E k 5X, COSTS „ Tel: 0113 231 9444 

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o^,) ■ . ^ , i..i , . ^ i ^ .i, .-— m ., E-Mail: 5ales@firstcom.dcmon.co.uk 

Showroom A rldn •-;•;■ am 



Dept. CU, Unit 3, Armley Park Court 
Stannlngley Road, Leeds. LS12 2AE 



COMPUTERS 



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provide us with as much detail on 
your systems and problems as possi- 
ble, to help us solve things for you. 



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Cryptic compiler 

1 . I am currently 
studying Computer 
Science. All of the 
coding is tarried out 
using my Amiga and 
tools such as Dice 
and GNU C. The finishing touches 
such as graphic interface and so on 
are finally done on PCs at college 
using Borland C+ +. Next year the 
course will cover C+ + . As GNU C 
can compile C+ + code, I need help 
as to the command line used for 
compiling, I've read the documenta- 
tion that's supplied with GNU but to 
no avail, f would appreciate it if you 
Or some one out there could help 
me. 2. I also have minor problems 
with a hard drive that I recently pur- 
chased. The hard drive in question is 
a Seagate 1.2 Go drive. The problem 
with the drive is, that it won't boot 
from cold. I have to do a warm reset. 
This is a minor inconvenience and 
one I can live with. 

An, Co. Meath 

1. The GNU C/C++ compiler is a 
direct port from UNIX. 
Consequently, it has a rather 
arcane user interface, with hun- 
dreds of command-line switches 
and parameters. However, if the 
correct front- end to the compiler is 
called, all the tedious setting of 
options is performed by the com- 
piler itself and an appropriate envi- 
ronment is created for whichever 
language you wish to use. When 
the compiler is invoked with the 
gcc command, it gets set up for 
standard C mode; when called 
with g++', C++ mode is sat up. In 
addition, correct naming of files is 
important to make the compiler 
process a particular file as C or 
C++ source coda. Files that are 
named with a suffix \c* get com- 
piled as C; files suffixed with '.«', 
'.ewe', '.cap' or "C" get compiled as 
C+ + . This behaviour may be over- 
ridden with the -x switch. For 




Use fast HD floppy disks with the Catwejsel controller. 



example, entering the command 
'g++ -x C++ source 1c 
source2.cpp -o my prog r will com- 
pile the two source files both as 
C + + (even though the first is 
named incorrectly) with the C+ + 
default settings and will produce 
an executable called mypreg'. This 
is not the place for a detailed dis- 
cussion of GNU. For information 
that is more digestible than the 
documentation supplied with GNU 
C, point your web browser at 
http://www.ninemoons.eom/GG/d 
ocs/GGjtoc.htmt.Z. The reason you 
cannot boot your machine from a 
cold reset lie; switching your 
machine on} is because your hard 
drive does not get up to operating 
speed in time for the system to 
recognise it. When you perform a 
warm reset (e.g., pressing CTRL 
and the two Amiga keys), the hard 
disk is already spinning so is able 
to reach the correct speed in time. 
This is quite a common problem, 
especially when there are multiple 
devices connected to the IDE inter- 
face, There are two possible solu- 
tions: the first and simplest 
solution is to Upgrade your 
KickStart ROMs to version 3.1. 
0S3.1 has a longer reset delay 
built-in to overcome this very 



problem. The second solution is to 
construct yourself a circuit which 
witl create a longer reset delay and 
connect it into your Amiga's reset 
line. If you are handy with a sol- 
dering iron, take a look at 
aminet.hard, hack 'bootdelay.lha 

Amiga DTP wizard 



am a pensioner and 
| am attending a com- 
puter class locally We 
use PCs, and I have 
H' jat 't'M iB been making greet- 
ings cards using Microsoft Publisher 
This prints four pages on a sheet 
of A4 paper in such a way that whon 
the paper is folded there is a picture 
On the front, a second picture on the 
inside left, a greeting on the inside 
right and my name on the back, I 
have an Amiga 1200 at home, and I 
would love to purchase a program 
that would do all this for me on my 
machine. I have two publishing pro- 
grams, PageStream and Page-Setter, 
and neither of these will do alf four 
functions at once. 

Can you please tell me if there is 
any such program available on this 
market at present and where I could 
obtain one. 

Sidney Ray. Surrey. 





InitCD problems 



We have received several reports o(f problems when trying to launch the InitCD script on recent cover CD's. 
If InitCD fails with the error message: ':C. UpdateCopy failed (return code 16349535B3)' then perform the fol- 
lowing: boot up your machine,, insert CUCDZ4 in your CD drive, ppen a shefl window and enter the 
command: 

copy CUCD24:libs asyncio library libs: 
This problem is caused by the tool UpdateCopy which is called by JnfcCD. UpdateCopy requires the latest ver- 
sion of a syncio. library. M you have an older version of this library installed on your system, asyncio. library will 
load this instead and fail. The above command will copy the correct version of the library to your system. 



I em unaware of any Amiga soft- 
ware that is specifically for creat- 
ing greetings cards. But it is 
possible, through ARexx - the 
Amiga's more powerful equivalent 
to the PC's wizards - to 'program' 
other applications to let you do so. 

For example, it is possible to 
write ARexx scripts or macros for, 
say. Word worth or PageStream, 
that asks the user for a greeting 
message and a picture to use and 
then will create the card in the 
manner you have described. If you 
don't feel up to the task of pro- 
gramming it yourself - don't worry. 
The chances are somebody has 
already written the vary script that 
you need. 

There are scripts available on 
the Ami net, for example, to create 
business cards, calendars, CD 
inlays, etc. Take a look in the direc- 
tories text/print, text/dtp or 
utll/rexjc. If you do not have access 
to the internet you could try con- 
tacting a PD library to enquire if 
they have any collections of such 
scripts. Another good place to try 
would! be your local user group. 




Troubled driving 

I have recently 
ins tallied aVVOC 3.5" 
21 0Mb hard disk into 
my Amiga 1200 with a 
Viper 1 230/28 Mhz and 
2Mb Fast Ram, I have 
been an Amrga user since 1992 and 
have used the same hard drive as an 
Overdrive PCMCIA device for years, 
but decided to move it to the inter- 
nal IDE port. I purchased the correct 
cable from Power Computing for 
this, and I fitted, re-partitioned and 
formatted the disk correctly. This far. 
everything seems fine. After suc- 
cessfully installing WB 3.0. I began 
to re-install my software, and there 
my problems started. 

Everything installs fine, and 
appears in the relevant directory as it 
would normally. Some software 
works just fine, but others, e.g. 
DO PUS 4 refuses to work. When I 
try to load it from CLI, I get the mes- 
sage: bad loadmodule heap. This 
also happens when I try to use other 
software, but not everything, which 
has confused me, I telephoned 
Power, and they suggested that I 




A Save vo imrl tie hassle of swapping 750 ll«p» r iisks - whh a CD-ROM drive. 



Changed the MasTransfer rate using 
HD-Toolbox. which I did, and even 
though I re-formatted the drive, the 
same thing happened! know that 
you have loads of enquiries, but this 
problem has rendered my computer 
almost useless, sg I would appreci- 
ate some help 

Tim Hutchings, via e-mail. 

There are two obvious probable 
causes of your hard drive prob- 
lems. The first on* is, as Power 
pointed out, the MaxTransfer set- 
ting on each of the hard drive par- 
titions; the second possibility is 
your power supply, 1. The 
MaxTransfer setting, contrary to 
popular belief, is not a rate but a 
size. It tells your filing system how 
big a chunk to grab from the 
device in one go. You should not 
have to change it, except for some 
older IDE drives. These type of dri- 
ves were never designed to have 
blocks greater than, say, 128K read 
from them at once, When you try 
to Jo so, the data gets mangled. 
This fault is an intermittent one, 
since it only 
occurs when 
reading large 
files, and the 
symptoms tend 
to be things like 
bad hunk errors, 
etc. This could 
well be what is 
causing your 
problems. 
The solution is 
to use 

HDToolBox {or 
an equivalent) to 
modify each of 
your partitions. 
First try chang- 
ing MaxTransfer 
to Ox IF EDO (in 
decimal this is 
127.5Kb). If it 
still does not 
work, try DxFEuO 
(63.5Kb), The 
procedure to do 
this is as follows: 




Start up HDTootSom. 
Partition Drive and i 
first hard drive 
check the box marked 
Options, select Change 
desired value for M»iT- 
the string requester (i 
Return) and click OK 
for the all the remaining i 
When done, click on OK and tftea 
Save Changes to Drive The* t at 
2, There is a law in comjMtaag 
known as Poumelle's Law tf ro* 
have a Computer problem. c*wca 
your cables first. There is an **■*»» 
alent of this which applies to Dm 
A1200; H you have a problem, 
check your power supply first That 
weedy P5U shipped with the 
A1200 is designed to cop* wrrJi at 
most a 2.5" inch hard drive and a 
smallish memory expansion 3 S* 
hard drives cause problems 
only because of the greater 
load in general and the larger 
amount of heat to be dissipated, 
but because the power connecter 
on the internal IDE interface of an 
A1200 is not designed to take dan 
load, either. The solution is to gat 
an uprated PS U and power the 
hard drive directly from it, not vie 
the motherboard. 

Keyboard bugs? 

Some time ago i 

bought an Evetecn 
EZ-Key keyboard 
interface a' 

it. Everything soamaaj 
to work fine or so I 
thought. Only recently when another 
Amiga owner was using my system 
did he make me realise my I m.Lu—j 
adaptor was malfunctioning 
problem seems to be that the adap- 
tor will not accept two keys press**) 
at the same time, for example W 
playing a 'Doom' style game and l 
press a key to walk forward, if I thee 
press a turn key the player stops 
walking forward and turns. 

The keyboard adaptor win not 
accept two commands at the & 
time as my original keyboard oVJ 
and this does not only occ 
games, but serious app 
originally thought this was a 
ent fault with all keyboard adafj 
which is why I did not realise i 
was a problem, but a friend i 
me his adaptor (from a different 
company} didn't suffer from tt 
worked without fault or i 
tions my adaptor had trouble < 
and his cost less than half the 
Eyetech solution. I have also tned 
three alternative keyboards, or* 
which was an Amiga 2000 keyboard 






Or page It stunner - a topless, Westera Digital hiri ckiwe. 



and they all fail to work correctly 
with the EZ-Key, I tried these key- 
boards with my friend's adaptor and 
all of them, including my own, 
worked perfectly- So what could be 
the problem? Is there a software 
solution or is the keyboard adaptor 
at fault? 

Richard. Chapman, via e-mail 

This is not a fault as such with the 
Eyetech keyboard adaptor; it's 
more of a feature. The interface 
does not handle simultaneous key- 
presses in the same way that the 
A 1200 keyboard does. This is 
inherent in the interface itself: it 
does not matter what type of key- 
board you connect it to* Similar 
problems occur with the Micronik 
keyboard interface. There is no 
solution to this problem, other 
than buying a different interface. 
The Ateo keyboard interface, for 
example, does allow multiple key- 
presses- Ateo Concepts products 
are distributed in the UK by White 



Knight Technology, who may be 
contacted at 01920 B22321. 



Please, no more! 

I know that vcu consider 
1a5D0 dead and that 
there are only a few 
■■people using one these 



days, but I still use it. 

So: 1. I've heard that by setting spe- 
cific [umpers on A&OO'S board, the 
A500 could "see" the extra Fast 
RAM as Chip RAM - if you have a 
1 Mb Agnus, that is, which I do. 
Could you tell me which jumpers 
are they? 2 In order to upgrade 
from OCS to ECS, which chips do 1 , 
have to replace? Are there any con 
sequences from such an upgrade? 
3 . I've decided to buy an accelera- 
tor (either Power Computing's Viper 
520CD orCSAg Derringer 
5O0/2000S. Could you give advice on 
what should I look tor when buying 
an accelerator? I Do you happen to 
know the above two?) 

Georgios Marinis-Artelaris, via e-mail 









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The reason we consider the AS00 
dead is that it is now over 1 1 years 
old and has limited expansion 
potential simply because very little 
hardware is produced for it any 
more. I will answer your questions, 
hut please, after this, no more 
A500 questions. 1. Yes- This is pos- 
sible, but it actually requires physi- 
cal modification of the 
motherboard (cutting of tracks, 
soldering, etc). Look at, for 
example; 

aminet/hard/hack/a500chip-lha. 
2. You must replace the Denise 
chip with an ECS Denise (chip 
number 8373). 3. The Viper 520CD 
is good (see review in CU 
December $7). But ask yourself this 
- even if you perform the modifica- 
tions above and buy a 520CD. you 
will still have a dated and under- 
powered machine, limited to only a 
33MHz 020, 8Mb of Fast RAM and 
no AG A, A realistic minimum speci- \ 
fication for an Amiga these days is 
a 2 5 MHz 68040. Instead of spend- 
ing money expanding your A500, 
why not buy an A1200? They are 
available at absurdly cheap prices 
second hand, and even retail new 
at well under £200. Vou would then 
have a machine which is still sup- 
ported by the market and which 
has vastly more potential. 

HD (How Denser) 

floppies? 

I need (want I an HD flop- 
py drive for my A1 200T. 1 
find that the faceplate 
Eyetech supplied me 
with tor my internal floppy drive i3 
both unattractive and falls off at reg- 
ular intervals. I therefore decided to 
kill two birds with one stone and 
replace my dfO with a high density 
drive, However, I can't seem to find 
any way to do this. The high density 
drives on sale either come without a 
face-plate, are not designed to con- 
nect to the A12QQ'& internal floppy 
drive connector, or are for the A400Q 
(which, I am told, can not be con- 
nected to an A1200). Is there any 
way that you know of to connect a 
high density floppy with a faceplate 
to my A 1200 as dfO? Will a 
Catweasel allow me to do this? 

Gerald Mellor, via e-mail 




AReu Macros - tie Amiga's better Wirirll equivalent. 



The pinout of the connector to an 
A120C floppy drive is substantially 
different from that of a standard 
PC one. Therefore, it is not simply 
a case of connecting up a PC high 
density drive and hoping that it 
will work, ft is actually possible to 
modify a PC drive to work with the 



Al200's floppy drive Interface 
(some of the later A 1200's were 
shipped with an HD drive) but the 
1200's I/O hardware is not up to 
the task of reading from an HD 
drive - they can only manage it at 
half speed- A better solution is 
something like the CatWeasel or 
Eyetech's Disk Plus system, These 
are both complete replacements 
for the A 1200's floppy interface, 
and both allow the direct connec- 
tion of and full performance with 
PC HD floppy drives. 

The CatWeasel is quite an extra- 
ordinary piece of kit. Not only does 
it give you the benefit of connect- 
ing cheap, fast and more capacious 
HD floppies to your Amiga, but it 
also allows you to read over 20 dif- 
ferent file systems, including ell PC 
and Mac formats (even the weird 
multi-speed, single-sided onesl- It 
is a real boon to the emulation nut 
(sorry, retro enthusiast) as well, 
being capable of reading things 
like CBM 1541 and Apple Me disks 
(providing you have a 5.25" drive). 

Seedy ROM questions 

I have a few questions 
to ask you.1 , I am hav- 
ing troubles with my 
CD-ROM. I have an 
A1 200 with 10MB 
RAM. a 2.1GB hard drive and an LG 
Electronics 16 speed CD-ROM 
placed in an Eyetech tower using the 
Eyetech 4-way buffered IDE inter- 
face, I am using a driver called 
"cd. device" and the CD+ + filesys- 
tem to run the CD-ROM. My main 
problem is that the CD-ROM refuses 
to read certain files on some of your 
cover CD's even though I can access 
the files on a PC's CO-ROM. It also 
seems to have trouble reading the 
CD's while trying to run InitCD or 
when it tries to load an icon's default 
tool from the CD, the CD-ROM light 
comes on and stays on although it is 
reading nothing. 1 have already had 
to exchange my CD-ROM for anoth- 
er of the same make because the 
other one refused point blank to 
read any CD's. 

2. Is there any way to read enhanced 
CD's on the Amiga as I have several 
with QuickTime movies that I wish to 
view. 3. Apart from your DIY option, 
is there any other piece of hardware 
which would allow me to listen to 
audio output from my CD-ROM. 

Peter Lamont. via e-mail. 




1 . My advice to you is to replace 
the driver software for your CD- 
ROM drive; the "ed. device" is an 
old system and not best able to 



^ 



cope with modern CD-ROMs and 
drives. You should try to get the 
"ata pi. device" (as shipped with 
IDE -Fix) and for a filing system get 
either CacheCDFS (also shipped 
with IDE-Fix) or AmiCDFS2 Both 
of these systems come supplied on 
our cover CDs every month (IDE- 
Fix albeit in demonstration form). 
So there is really no excuse for not 
upgrading. 2, What do you mean 
by enhanced CDs? If you update 
your software as above, you will 
find that should be able to read all 
the standard types of CDs. 

If you wish to be able to view 
QuickTime movies on your Amiga, 
you will need some software like 
QT or CyberQT (both available 
from the Aminet in the drawer 
gfn/show). 3. You don't actually 
need any extra hardware to be 
able to listen to the audio output 
from your CD drive, just the cor- 
rect cable. The audio mixer circuit 
takes account of the fact that the 
output levels produced by your 
Amiga's audio and the CD's audio 
are not the same, and mixes them 
equally. Such circuits are available 
from, for example, Eyetech and 
Power Computing. 



A to Z 




Lithely, lovely and loquacious: three verbs 
which are rarely applied to John Kennedy... 
they do begin with "L" though. 



How to write to 
QfrA 

You can send your queries (or 
tech tips) to OfaA, CU Amiga 
Magazine, 37-39 Mi II harbour, 
Isle of Dogs, London El 4 9TZ. or 
preferably e-mail: q + a@cu- 
amiga.co.uk. We can accept let- 
ters or text files on floppy disk. 
Please do not send an SAE. WE 
CANNOT RESPOND DIRECTLY 
TO QUERIES BY POST OR 
OVER THE PHONE OR E-MAIL, 
nor answer every Q&A we are 
sent. Sorry. We do appreciate 
that you may have a serious 
problem and until Amiga 
International re- open a UK 
office you may have no-wbere 
else to turn, but we get so 
many questions we simply 
don't have the time or 
resources to answer them all. 
We do our best to use letters in 
Q&A that answer most common 
problems, so even if your own 
question is not answered you 
may find an appropriate 
solution here. 



L is for... 

Lab 

An AmigaDOS command which 
is used inside scripts. It defines 
a label which is effectively a 
location to which it's possible 
for the flow of control to jump 
to It's used with the SKIP com- 
mand: SKIP will jump to the 
label. 

LAN 

A Local Area Network is a collec- 
tion of computers connected, 
usually via cable, to share files 
and printers. 

The Amiga can be networked 
with other Amigas and comput- 
ers by means of the TCP/IP 
protocol. 

Library 

A set of program functions 

which can be shared by one or 
more programs. Libraries exist 
both in the Kickstart ROM, and 
on disk. 

Lightpen 

An alternative input device to the 
mouse. Lightpens are used by 
holding them up to the screen, 
whereby the computer can cal- 
culate their position. 
The Amiga hardware supports 
lightpens, but no-one uses them 
because they have quite a low 
resolution, and they make your 
arms ache. 

Lightwave 

One of the most successful 
Amiga programs ever, Lightwave 
is a professional quality image 
rendering program from NewTek, 
makers of the Video Toaster It's 
been used in films and in almost 
every sci-fi TV show you can 
think of. 

Lightwave is also available for 
other platforms, but it owes a lot 
to the Amiga. 

Linux 

A version of the powerful multi- 
user, multitasking UNIX operat- 
ing system. It and NetBSD are 
available for the Amiga. 



List 

The most powerful AmigaDOS 
command. List has a multitude 
of options, and all can be useful 
from time to time, All List does 
is create a list of the files pre- 
sent in the specified directory, 
but it's so flexible. You can list 
files of a certain age. include 
dates, examine attribute I 
and list directories'recursively. 
This makes it ideal for generat- 
ing text files which can be 
processed by other AmigaDOS 
scripts or ARexx programs. 

LMB 

A TLA for "Left Mouse Button". 
The Amiga can actually cope 
with three mouse buttons, 
although the third ts rarefy used. 
If your mouse does have an 
extra switch, PD utilities are 
available to make use of it: it can 
be handy having it act as a 
SHIFT key when dragging 
Workbench icons for example. 

LoadWB 

This AmigaDOS command usual- 
ly towards the last line in the 
startup-sequence script which 
the Amiga loads and executes 
on booting. It loads and acti- 
vates Workbench, so don't leave 
it out. It also has a "secret" 
option: LoadWB -debug will add 
extra commands to your 
Workbench menu. Go on, try it: 
but save everything first. If you 
happen to have an ASCII termi- 
nal connected to your Amiga's 
serial port and operating at 9600 
baud, so much the better. 

Locale 

One of the original Amiga 
Workbench floppy disks. Locale 
contains a Preferences editor 
which makes it possible to spec- 
ify some information for localis- 
ing your Amiga: you can alter 
some programs and Workbench 
routines to appear in Italian or 
Spanish for example. 

Lock 

One of those AmigaDOS com 
mands you wilt probably never 



use. Lock asks AmigaDOS to pre- 
vent writes to a disk drive. 
Why is this useful? Potentially it 
could be used when debugging a 

program, I suppose. 

Logical Operators 

These are the basic functions of 

Boolean maths: essentially the 

core of all microprocessors and 

computers. 

There are four basic operations; 

AND, OR, NOT and XOFt or 

exclusive OR. 

Loops 

in programming terminology, a 
loop is a sequence of instruc- 
tions which can be repeated one 
Or more times, 

For example, if a program has to 
perform a hundred identical cal- 
culations the programmer can 
choose to write out the same 
calculation one hundred times, 
or put the calculation in a loop 
and execute it one hundred 
times, 

Loopback 

By "looping back" an output to 
an input, it's possible to test or 
debug a system. For example, 
you might use the Amiga's serial 
port in loopback mode to test a 
communications program: but 
only if you were bored. 

Low-level Language 

A programming language which «s 
better suited to computers than 
people. A good example is 
Assembler, which has a lot of v< 
very basic instructions. Each 
instruction can be directly translat- 
ed to a few machine code instruc- 
tions. Assembly language 
programs therefore run very qu 
ly, but take an age to write and 
debug. 

Lurk 

To take part in a newsgroup by 

only watching and reading, never 
posting. Lurking is fine, t 
more fun to take part in conver- 
sations - unless they are very 
sad r such as those on the 
alt.digitiser newsgroup. 



■ 







■ 





Got an opinion on Amiga Inc's big 
plans or anything else? Email your 
comments to backchat 
@cu-amiga. co.uk or post them to 
the address below. 






r* 



isle ot 9T7l 



Cock up 

Look, I'm sorry but it has to be 
said' Amiga inc are making a cock 
up. I have owned an Amiga for 
three years knowing as I do that 
Intel make crap chips. FACT. If 
Amiga Inc plan to to make x86s I 
may as well go and build myself 
a PC now. By my count I can build 
a PC for £330 inc VAT. What we 
want is a budget version of phase 
5 r s philosophy: a single G3 unit 
with a decent graphics card and 
sound and other features that we 
are accustomed to for about £600- 
£700. If Apple can do it Amiga can. 
This message from Amiga inc fills 
me with despair. Hoping for some- 
thing better, 

Richard Faulkner, via email 

Shape up! 

Congratulations on becoming the 
world's, best selling Amiga maga- 



zine, but I must admit that I am dis- 
appointed in you. OK. so you are 
the world's best selling. Amiga mag- 
azine, but still the magazine could 
be a tor better! The June 1998 
issue is one of the worst I have 
seen for a looong time. Let's start 
with the cover page, it's awful I 
Who has made this awful, childish, 
poor Spaceboy drawing? It looks 
like something from the 70s. Wake 
\ up, this is the '90s! 

The four pages about the Reality 
■ Game Engine would have been 

more than enough, but then comes 
! Tony Horgan with another eight (!!) 
i pages about the same boring stuff. 
I I'm sure he has put a lot of work 
: into it, but it's not the kind of stuff I 
; want to read. Your August 1997 
; issue about coding and StormC 
I was very good, but this time it was 
I all just boring. 

And it continues, with three 
; pages about Spami And then 
i comes the two awfully designed 
pages about World of Amiga. I 
wonder if the guy who made this 
article may be colour blind? I think 
you should give this man a course 



about the revolutionary productions 
from demo partys, like Rise by TRSI 
from TG9B? I don't think so, it would 
at least be better than Spam. But it 
seems like.Petro Tyschtschenko and 
the commercial Amiga market don't 
like the demo scene, which really is 
a pity. I think I have read that Petro 
didn't like the demo scene because 
it didn't help the Amiga, he would 
like us all to make games instead. 
That selfish Petro-!#5##! ;) 

Torgeir Amundsen, Norway. 

Thanks for your frank comments 
Togeir. In order for CU Amiga to he 
a successful magazine (which is 
quite a feat in the Amiga market 
these days} we try to caver all 
aspects of Amiga usage. This does 
include coverage of the demo 
scene, not least in our regular 
round-ups of the best demos on 
our cover CDs. It also includes a 
diverse range of alternative areas 
end inevitably it's not all going to 
appeal to everyone at the same 
time. Our readership varies enor- 
mously in age, interests and aes- 
thetic taste. 

With any luck, sometime soon 
there will be a big enough 
pool of Amiga users to war- 
rant magazines that can 
focus on specific areas and 
groups of users. At the 
moment that's a pipe dream. 
We have a hunch that 
"Amiga Seandoubler 
Magazine" wouldn't fare 
very well in the current cli- 
mate, As for why we didn't 
review every scan doubler 
under the sun in the same 
issue, it's simply because 
they weren't all available at 
the same time. Rian Hughes 
supplied the cower 
illustration. 

Tell the world 

Everybody keeps going on 
about how others need to be 
A. CluUisfc mw « » dmit tikt ■■ Sit rttn giium tUfte? RiM Hnib«' Jim IS CU Anil* «•■» 



in design quick as hell, or sack him 
even quicker. The Screen and Tech 
Scene parts have good design 
though, and if all the articles in the 
magazine had been like this I would 
be much more satisfied, 

I really looked forward to the 
Scan Doublers test, because then I 
thought I finally could decide which 
seandoubler to buy, But you only 
tested the Micronik Scan Doublers, 
so it didn't help me much. Why did- 
n't you test the ScanDoublers which 
Power Computing sell? They even 
have versions with flickerfixers. 
Micronik don't. And wtiat about the 
ScanDoublers Eyetech sell? I am 
just as confused 

As you might see there are many 
things you can write about instead 
of spam and how to make games. A 
test of the different 4way-IDE inter- 
faces EyetOCh. Power Computing 
and Blittersoftare offering would be 
nice. Remember that there are a lot 
of people out there that have to 
upgrade their Amiga 1200 a bit. I 
also think you could Start to write 
some articles about the demo 
scene, at least after big events like 
TR TG and Asm. Would it hurt so 
much to tell the rest of the world 




informed that the Amiga is not just a 
glorified games machine and, on the 
contrary, is quite capable of profes- 
sional use, Well I've come up with a 
simple way of letting people know 
this. So simple in fact that I can't 
think why I've not thought of it 
before! 

How many people out there use 



j form which 1 don't quite understand 
either. Is it just a PC with an Amiga 
on a card? If so what's the point Of 
that? Leaving that aside, there's still 
the matter of Amiga Inc/Gateway's 
ability to keep to their word. 

Everyone seems to be in agree- 
ment that Gateway never say some- 
thing until they know it's fact, and 



"Why then did they tell us they would be going ahead with 
a dual PowerPC and 680x0 CPU before doing a U-turn? " 



their Amigas to produce documents 
etc that others are going to see? 
Quite a lot I would imagine. I know I 
do, from letters to posters and 

spreadsheet charts! 

Well, what I've started doing is 
including a footnote, in 8 point text 
so it's visible but unobtrusive, on all 
the documents that I produce which 
states that "This document was pro- 
duced on an Amiga 1200 using. ." 
and then I enter whichever software 
package was used. 

Simple eh! And maybe, just 
maybe someone who reads it will 
think "Oh I didn't realise it was possi- 
ble to produce something like this on 
an Amiga" and then begin to look fur- 
ther at our machine. Every little 
helps. By the way, unfortunately this 
was written at work using a Plastic 
Contraption as my Amiga is not yet 
Net connected! 

Thanks for a great magazine. 

Dave Lb Huray, via email 

Where to now? 

One thing I pride myself on is not 
being one of the PC-owning sheep. 
The will and ability to weigh up the 
iacts and make an educated decision 
is something I hope to never lose. 
However, I must confess in the light 
of Amiga Inc's recent announce- 
ments, I'm looking for some advice. 

To be honest I'm more than a little 
confused. For example, Amiga Inc 
say they will have this amazing new 
machine in 18 months or so, We've 
heard that before haven't we? Then 
there's this PC-based interim plat- 




barely release any details of forth- 
coming- products until they are 
almost ready for release. Why then 
did they tell us they would be going 
ahead with a dual PowerPC and 
680x0 CPU standard just a few 
months before doing a U-turn? And 
what is there to say that they don't 
just happen to change their minds 
on their latest plans in a few 
months? 

So. do we hold on to our 
machines and leave them as they 
are until a new wonder machine 
appears? Or, do we carry on upgrad- 
ing as and when possible and keep 
■saving for that PowerPC card? Or do 
we swear allegiance to another as 
yet un released machine (the 
pre\Box)? Or,., what? Help please! 

Dan Chamberlain, vis email 

It is confusing isn't it? Flick to 



Wot no stickers? 



Both me and a friend who get CU 
Amiga on subscription didn't get a 
sticker with the mag in the post. 
Are we alone ? Nice to meet you 
at the WO A. Very impressed 
all the hi-res SVGA monitors in 
use. t want one now. 



page 23 for a distillation of the 
facts and the latest 
developments. 

Be U Amiga? 

I purchased the July issue of CU 
Amiga on account of the WOA show 
report and the Be feature. I fell a 
strong pro BeOS message through- 
out the mag which is no bad thing 
given the similarities between 
AmigaOS and BeOS. 

Is there any chance of CU Amiga 
going dual format, covering Amiga 
and BeOS? There must be plenty of 
room on the CD-ROM edition to 
include BeOS apps as well - 
nutty suggestion but I'm sure you 
can see the advantages 

Darren Debono. via email 

No, is the short answer ff BeOS 
does turn out to be used as a base 
for the new AmigaOS then there 
wouldn inevitably be some connec- 
tions along the way, but so far 
Amiga Inc have still not named 
their OS development partner, so 
we're still speculating about Be s 
significance at this stage As it 
stands there's no reason to intro- 
duce Be-related articles into CU 
Amiga as a regular thing 

A New Era 

So Amiga Inc have finally spilled the 
beans about the next generation 



stickers. Someone forgot to stick 
them in. You should find you 
have your sticker with this issue, 
As for the future of CU Amiga, 
we'll be reflecting what you, the 
Amiga users, want from us. If 
this next generation Amiga 




A 5tf * SitMKJit: i itw ctKtle with t SSDDm 
HlkrtMJ *i#s*i 



Is CU Amiga going to stay 
classic Amigas or go half and half 
with the next generation or will 
there be a new mag for the new 

machine? 

Gareth Ma ley, via email 

First of all, let us appologise to 
all subscribers for the missing 



comas out and is a massive hit, 
then our coverage will change 
accordingly. If it flops or [shock 
horror!) doesn't turn up in time 
(or at all} then we'll keep on 
with coverage of the "classic" 
Amigas, We don't have any 
plans to spirt into two maga- 
zines or launch a new Amiga 
mag in the immediate future. 



Amiga, and what should w 
about it? I'll tell you; it's farm 

The potential is enormous Thjs i 
mark a new era in computing Bui 
the success of the next ger>eot«o> 
depends on four things in my 
Opinion: 

• That Amiga Inc market it prop- 
erly worldwide. Sega is planning a 
$500 million US and European 
launch for the same time that tha 
first nent generation Amigas h t Tha 
streets. This might be a bit much 
ask for, possibly not neccessary. as 
the Sega console will be very under- 
powered compared to the new 
Amiga. But $100-200 million is need- 
ed to ensure it's noticed - 

■ That it's available in all J 
street chains. If people can'i 
no one will buy it. It will be a hard 
fight for shelf space next Christmas 
with the Project X consoles. Sega s 
Dreamcast, the next generation 
WebTV with a powerful 3D chip 
the Playstation 2(?), the Nintendo 
128(7) and low cost PCs. 

• Killer software availability- 
Software sells hardware, and the 
next generation needs qualiv. 
ware, both games and serious. To 
achieve this, developers need to 
begin development now. Amiga Inc 
need to actively persuade develop- 
ers to develop for the Amiga, and 
co-funding should also be consid- 
ered, as software is crucial. 

Some people seem to think 
Amiga Inc killed the Amiga by 
ditching the existing OS, but I hava 
to ask you: Do you really care if tha 
OS you are running is the original 
AmigaOS, if the new OS is as 
effective and easy to use? And tha 
Amiga community will still be here, 
something I think is the most impor- 
tant reason for staying with the 
Amiga, both now and in the fut 
And it will still be called an Amiga 
The spirit is still there! Save youf 
pennies! I am! 

Vidar Langberget, via email 

PowerPC is the future 

It is quite hard for me to sta 
the Amiga as I am only 14 years o 
and I live in Australia. I play gamas 
all the time against all these PC 
users and almost always beat them 
although it is getting difficult to do 
this because 95% of PC games are 
not out on the Amiga! 

Since the Amiga has PowerPC 
and will be getting better all the 
time, why don't the people do some- 
thing? If I could program I would do 
it! I became a play tester for 
Westwood after I became bast * 



lOI 



BACKCHAT 




Gates gag 



This month's Gates gag comas 
from Aubrey Elliott. Can you do 
better than this? 

BiJI Gates dies in a car accident. 
He finds himself in purgatory, 
being sized up by St. Peter. 

St. Peter: "I'm not sure whether 
to send you to Heaven or Hell. 
After all. you enormously helped! 
society by putting a computer in 
almost every home in America, 
yet you also created that ghastly 
Windows '95, I'm going to do 
something I've never done 
before in your case; I'm going to 
let you decide where you want 
to go. I'm willing to let you visit 
both places briefly, if it will help 
your decision." 

Gates: "Okay, let's try Hell first" 

So Sill goes to Hell. It's a beauti- 
ful, clean, sandy beach with deaf 
waters and lots of bikini-clad 
women running around, playing 
in the water, laughing and frol- 
icking about. The sun is shining 
and the temperature is perfect. 
He's very pleased.... 

Gates: "This is great! If this is 
Hell, I really want to see heaven ! " 

So off they go. Heaven is a place 
high in the clouds, with angels 
drifting about, playing harps and 
singing. It's nice, but not as 
enticing as Hell. 

Gates: "I think Id prefer Hell." 

St Peter: "Fine, you'll be there in 
an instant." 

Two weeks later. St. Peter 
decides to check on the late bil- 
lionaire to see how he's doing in 
Hell. When he gets there, he 
finds Sill shackled to a wall, 
screaming amongst hot flames in 
a dark cave, being burned and 
tortured by demons. 

St. Peter: "How's it going?" 

Gates: "This is awful! It's noth- 
ing like the Hell i visited two 
weeks ago! What happened to 
that other place, with the beauti- 
ful beaches and the scantily-clad 
women playing in the water?" 

St. Peter: "That was a demo." 



the world at Command and 
Conquer. I have had a beta of 
Command and Conquer 2 for a lit- 
tle while, and in my opinion, this is 
the best game ever. Now, put two 
and two together and the Amiga 
becomes a hit all over again. 
Ultima Online would give us a kick 
into multiplayer gaming also? 

Please do something 
ClickBQQM (or whoever else)! 

Andrew Werchowiecki 

< gamegu ru@vi anet net.a u > 

An Amiga for all 

The Amiga has always been a 
graphics and video computer, The 
new Amiga planned by Amiga Ing 
will be a spectacular multimedia 
machine. The web is full of sounds 
and animations. 

In amongst all this fun, disabled 
users are in danger of being forgot- 
ten. At one time, the Amiga could 
be used with a Concept keyboard, 
for instance. Is this still true? The 
Amiga's Shell makes it possible in 
principle for a blind or partially 
sighted u&er to operate the 
machine without graphics. Almost 
all Amiga programs can be started 
up from the Shell. The program 
Scrip it (on Ami net) should give 
access to any window, button or 
gadget in any program, purely from 
a verbal command. But this only- 
works if the screens and windows 
have names, so that Scripit can 
find them. 

So. a plea to programmers; 
name your windows so that the 
program can be used without a 
mouse. Web designers, please do 
a text only version of your pages. 
Let's have a computer which is 
friendly to all users. 

Don Cox, doncox@enterprise.net 

A true Amigan? 

Recently, there has been some dis- 
cussion on the Internet about who 



makes a true Amigan or not. A 
small minority of people in the 
Amiga community seem to be 
obsessed with the idea that the 
Amiga should be the only com- 
puter in the world and wouldn't 
accept there ate other comput- 
ers, even consoles such as the 
PlayStation. 

Some even say the Amiga is 
excellent at everything and no 
other computers can match it. 
This may have been true eight or 
nine yeais ago but this kind of 
thinking is, in my opinion, 
extremely narrow minded and 
almost frightening. I believe every 
computer platform is good at 
some things and bad at others, 
and I see no reason whatsoever 
not to take advantage of these. 

Wake up! It's time to accept 
that the Amiga is not number 
one. It's time to accept that 
other platforms can run rings 
ground an Amiga on certain 
tasks. It's time to accept that it 
is stupid to blandly state that 
non-Amiga owners (or non- 
Ami gans?f are stupid and don't 
knew a thing about computers; 
does that makes Mat Bettinson 
stupid? I think not. 

It's time to realise strong and 
weak points of our Amigas, and 
other computers and combine 
them eg, Siamese for instance, 
or at least learn them and sug- 
gest/implement these ideas into 
making the Amigs a better, mpre 
competitive computer. 

As for saying who is a true 
Amigan or not - that is up to the 
individuals themselves, not for 
others to judge them ; people 
have no right to judge others in 
anyway. Remember: The Amiga 
is not a religion nor it is perfect. 

Kyle Sterry, via email 

Blimey! That's a provocatively 
well-balanced view of things! 




To the Point... 



SWOS revitalised 

Thanks for revitalising one of my 
favourite Amiga games ever: 
SWOS! Seeing all the new World 
Cup editions of PlayStation and PC 
football games coming out left me 
and my best mate feeling a bit 
behind the times. Then I noticed 
the update cover disk on your July 
issue! Now I don't care if England 
win or get knocked out at the first 
stage. Well, that's a bit of a lie. but 
you get the point. 

Nick Sinclair, East Anglia 










, ill «•«•!• 

Killer Instinct 

I just had some fun playing Killer 
Instinct for Gameboy on my Amiga 
1200 tonight The game works just 
fine with Wionka-Lad, and only suf- 
fers from a few small graphical 
problems with Amiga VGB. I'm 
attaching a screen grab of it run- 
ning On Amiga VGB. I was suprisod 
at the high quality of the game, 
despite the small screen size and 
that it is grayscale. In W2onka-Lad 
it even runs at a playable speed on 
my 50MHz 68030. 

Mathew R. (gnash, via email 

Yeah, it looks just like the coin-op 
doesn't it? 

Mad scientist 

I am looking For users with like 
interests. I'd like to find other users 
with a scientific bent (notice my e- 
mail is madsci. which stands for 
my initials MAD. and the fact that 
I practise the profession of 
chemistry), 

Mark Dekeyser, Canada 
email: rnadsci@sente)c.net 



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OF VI. 




Points of View 

Time for a few more opinions... please note that the views 
expressed here are not necessarily those of CU Amiga. 




Get your story straight. 



The Impending Schism 




WOA came and with it came 
The Big Announcement. 
Sure enough it was big. 
but it was also a total mess. Amiga 
Inc. should have had plenty of time 
for all the details, but seemed so far 
off the ball when it came to what the 
likely impact would be that it was 
humourous. The i m pi i cot ions of it 
were to say the lea si heartening - 
the possibility of a senous revival of 
the Amiga suddenly looks rather 
good - but they were father 
obscured by the unseemly mess, of 
a presentation. 

The fuss that rose from the 
announcement was in fact largely 
vapour; the problem was that the 



on the CU Amiga website late that 
mght that the full facts were widely 
available. 

Further problems stemmed from 
the fact that Amiga I no's announce- 
ment appeared to be the end for any 
Amiga development for the next two 
years. All of this was unnecessary - 
by the time of the evening press 
release, Al had added aline about 
working with phase6. and by the end 
of the World of Amiga weekend. 
there was a lot of talk about keeping 
the Amiga Classic line alive and giv- 
ing Amiga owners something to keep 
them going. All this realty should 
have been in from the start, 

Problem is. Amiga Inc. don't know 
who to talk to. They seem to have 
been taking advice based more on its 
proximity to Sioux City than its use- 
fulness. They should have talked to 
the major players such as phase5. 
Haaoe&Partner and Index well 
enough befoie the announcement 
that they would not have had to 
spend the weekend in damage limita- 
tion, and had they chnsen to discuss 
the announcement with the Amiga 
press we could have saved them no 
end of bad publicity after all we 
know what this market is like arvd 



"Problem is, Amiga Inc. don't know who to talk to. 
They seem to have been taking advice based more 
on its proximity to Sioux City than its usefulness." 



information on general press 
sources such as CNet on-line 
appeared to be at odds with the 
information presented at the WOA 
conference. A telephone conference 
link up for non attending journalists 
world wide was so close to inaudible 
that those who listened in seemed 
to have heard a different press con- 
ference than the rest of us. 

The Internet was buzzing with the 
false news that Amiga was going 
Intel, and the main source, the CNet 
news report, seemed to be changed 
every tew hours without explanation- 
It was not until the story was posted 



how people will react. Amiga Inc. at 
last have a PR man. Bill McEwen. 
Hopefully he is going to help Al 
with their presentation, but he isn't 
going to be able to advise them on 
the market. Amiga Inc. need to think 
seriously about their market intelli- 
gence, because the WOA presenta- 
tion made them look unprofessional 
and ill-informed. It is a shame, 
because given what they actually 
announced, it should have made 
everyone very happy with them 
instead. ■ 

Andrew Korn, Deputy Editor of 
CU Amiga Magazine 



I" t's a cliche so tired it can bare- 
ly make it out of bed, but it 
continues to this day to be 
perhaps the best summary any- 
one could hope to make of the 
Amiga market since 1994: the 
curse of "may you live in interest- 
ing times," Who could be bored 
with all that bankruptcy intrigue 
going on? 

But just because ownership 
gets settled doesn't mean life 



for most purposes be distinct, 
separate entities. 

That means that Amiga devel- 
opers will be faced with an unen- 
viable task: they will have to 
choose. Obviously, the decision 
will be different for each person, 
and will rely not only on how 
many but what sort of user stays 
with the current course of Amiga 
technology and which take a 
flyer on the 5,0 machines, and 



"The burning question is - will there be a clean 
break, or just a splintering into countless little 
tiny shards?" 



returns to normal. Mo, because 

we're on a collision course with a 
wedge that will be hammered 
straight into the Amiga market. 
The burning question is - will 
there be a clean break, or just a 
splintering into countless little 
tiny shards? 

The message Amiga Inc deliv- 
ered in May the part they said 
out loud - was that on or about 
late 1999, new computers labeled 
'Amiga" which will bear presum- 
ably at least some resemblance 
in function if not in form to the 
machines we currently call 
"Amigas" will be available for pur- 
chase by people like you and me, 
not to mention all of the other 
wonderful people who will no 
doubt be attracted to its 
features. 

What they didn't point out 
but are certainly very aware of - 
is that not every single current 
Amiga user will set aside their 
humble machines or their 
hopped-up system, their towered 
A1 200 with the PPC card inside, 
their video workstations in order 
to buy their new wonder comput- 
er. And since the degree and 
effectiveness of emulation on the 
new AmigaOS 5.0 machines is 
still very nebulous (since neither 
actually exist!, these markets will 



on what their competitors 
choose to do, After all, it can 
suddenly become very profitable 
to be in a market where three of 
your competitors disappear, even, 
if your potential market has been 
cut in halt 

The same logic applies the 
other way - if you can be the 
first to make it into a new mar- 
ket, fledgeling though it may be, 
you will be the only game in 
town and can reap the rewards. 

Amiga Inc isn't exactly to 
"blame" - a split was coming in 
this market regardless of their 
actions. Some developers had 
decided to follow the route being 
defined by phase5 in the 
absence of Al guidance - and 
now that they have established 
their roadmap. there are still 
some developers who have com- 
mitted themselves to the existing 
Amiga market for the long haul. 
Of course, others have quite 
vocally backed Amiga Inc's plans. 

What will happen when the 
split comes? How will you han- 
dle it? How wiSI we at CD handle 
it? Only time will tell, but alas, 
they will certainly make for 
interesting times, ■ 
Ja£Of1 t.ompton, 
US Correspondent for CU 
Amiga Magazine 



104 



NTS OF VIEW 



It's not over yet 




I've had enough of people 
going on as if Bill Gates is 
_ some kind of comic book, style 
immortal anti-hero, destrned to 
control every aspect of the post 
millennial universe for all eternity. 
Well he's not. So he might be the 
richest men in the world or there 
abouts. He might be the most 
successful businessman ever He 
might be the personification of 
"the nerd who turned". He might 
have brainwashed the computer- 
using world into believing that 
there is no choice of computer 
platform and there never will be. 
He might have as much charisma 
as a blank CD. 

Now I'm not saying we shoi.' ' 
all lay off him and let him tramf 
the worid underfoot like some 
kind of 21st century techno-dic 
tator; quite the opposite in 
fact. What I am saying is yes, 
he has done well for himself 
and won't spend the winters 
of his latter years worrying 
about whether 
he can afford another bar on 
the electric fire, but that 
doesn't make him or his 
products untouchable, let 
alone im mortar. To quote a 
popular phrase: "the only 
constant in life is change". 

The common argument 
goes along the lines of "how 
can you expect any new comput 
er system to take over when 
everyone uses Windows on Intel- 
based hardware?". Quite simple 
really: offer them something bet- 
ter and cheaper. Do you have a 
PC? It's OK, you don't have to 
answer out loud, Maybe another 
member of the household uses 
one, or maybe you use one at 
work. Now I bet you this PC isn't, 
the same one you (or your invisi- 
ble friendS used five years ago. 
Why? Because it was upgraded to 



take advantage of the latest develop- 
ments. At one stage or another you 
probably found it easier to ditch the 
old machine and get a whole new 
one, maybe transplanting a few of 
the older bits into the new machine. 
To summarise, the old computer 
was thrown out and a new one 
bought and put in its place. See. it 
happens! 

Alternatives 

So that's proof that people do 
change the physical lump of steel 
and plastic on their desks, even if 
they usually swap it for something 
else in the same product line. Next 
comes the problem of shifting them 
to a different product line. That one 
is a bit trickier to illustrate since 
there has been virtually no opportu- 
nity for people to do that for quite 
some time, However, people do 
want an alternative. Of course we 
are probably the most passionate 
group of computer users when it 
comes to this subject, but even peo- 
ple who have never used anything 
else but a PC would be interested in 
something that does the job better 
not to mention something that does 
jobs their current PC 
can't do. 



not much time really. Once you've 
used a modern mouse-driven com- 
puter desktop, learning the ropes of 
a new variant is comparable to 
falling off a log. 

But what about cash? Microsoft 
aren't short of a few quid, which 
does give them a bit of an advan- 
tage over any potential rivals when it 
comes to marketing and advertising. 
Even so, Amiga Inc s parent compa- 
ny Gateway are doing pretty well 
too. With very careful, considered 
and even cunning marketing and 



well in the cup and hence a place 
in Europe and all the international 
TV coverage that goes witr 
either that or they'll go back 
down to the First Division!, 
Devise some Amiga-based bank 
cash point systems that make the 
current machines look like LCD 
calculators, and don't forget to 
include the Powered By Amiga 
logo on every screen. In flight 
entertainment systems! Give air- 
lines an edge on the competition 
by offering them interactive DVD 



"With very careful, considered and even cunning market- 
ing and advertising strategies it would be possible for 
them to build up the Amiga brand once more/' 



advertising strategies it would be 
possible for them to build up the 
Amiga brand once more. Perhaps 
the trick is not to go straight for 
man in the street * ard sell 

via TV ads 

There's more than one way to 
skin a cat as they say How about, 
for example, donating a few 
systems to major TV production 
units in exchange for a mention in 
the closina credits of 
amines ? 
not give 
them 




Everyone wants better tools and 
labour-saving appliances. 

I suppose you think Cm forgetting 
the matter of software compatibility. 
Surely I'm not suggesting people 
will dump the likes of Microsoft 
Office? Well. yes. Why not? No-one 
on this earth was born with the abili- 
ty to use Windows or a Windows 
application, That was a skill that was 
learnt over time, and let's be frank, 



a titling system which has Powered 
By Amiga permanantly etched into 
the corner of every screen? Work 
out a two or three year sponsorship 
deal with a Premiership footbad 
team that you think will make it into 
the European competitions in the 
following season (my tip is 
Middlesborough for good sponsor- 
ship value and a chance of doing 



movie players that give each pas- 
senger a choice of a range of 
films or TV programmes to 
watch, plus a variety of games 
including arcade, strategy and 
classic board games to please 
different people, not forgetting 
the golden rule: "Powered by 
Amiga" stamped on every screen. 

Amiga needs you 

f'rn sure we could all come up 
with a lot more ideas along these 
lines if we put our heads togeth- 
er. You never know, Amiga Inc 
might even come up with a cou- 
ple of their own. Here's an idea: 
how about you all think up some 
other marketing/advertising^ 
branding schemes and send 
them to us, We can then pass 
them on to Amiga Inc and they 
can choose to use any that they 
feel would be appropriate. 

Yes, that's decided. You write 
your crackpot marketing ideas 
down and we'll make sure they 
get to the right people, Don't go 
on about, what you think the new 
hardware should be, or what you 
think Commodore did wrong in 
the past or any of that. Keep it 
short and sweet, because let's 
face it, if Amiga Inc are going to 
bring out a super computer within 
18 months they're going to be 
pretty busy anyway. 

Get that grey matter ticking 
over and send your ideas to: 
Crackpot Ideas, CU Amiga, 37-39 
Millharbour, Isle of Dogs, London 
E 14 9TZ. Alternatively email your 
schemes to crackpot@cu- 
amiga.co.uk ■ 
Tony Horgan, Editor of CU 




TECHNO TRAGEDIES 



■M 







e Knnix Multisystem 



Did v ou know that Britain almost had its own killer games console? It's 
true - one of the biggest techno tragedies of the past decade is that one 
of the most original console designs ever didn't make it to market. 



Back in the late 1980 r s, a 
com pa ny called Konix 
were happily churning 
out joysticks. They 
were best known for 
their Speeding joystick, an innova- 
tive handheld design and still my 
favourite control after all these 
years. Building joysticks for a living 



5% 



r 






If Si 



■ BVI ^^^^ W 9 W W^^^l" 




must have seemed: a pretty tedious 
way of doing business, and so 
Konix were tempted to try design- 
ing something else; a brand new 
games console. 

The original design for the con- 
sole came from a company called 
Flare Technology, who had 
designed a computer system imagi- 
natively called the Flare One. 
Remember, this was the 1980s, and 
names like "Flare", "Duran Dufan" 
and "Elan" were considered cool, 

The heart of the Konix consols 
was a single ASIC (Application 
Specific Integrated Circuit) which 
contained the video generator, 
colour palette, disk controller, 



Blittef, ROM, fast RAM, 12 MIP 
Arithmetic and Logic Unit, RISC 
Digital Signal Processor, and A/D 
ports. In fact, the ASIC alone was 
83 complicated as the 68000 
processor used by the Amiga. 

The CPU driving the system was 
a 16bits S086 device, offering a 
palette of 4096 colours and resolu- 
tions of 256 by 200 or 512 by 200. 
These was a multi-channel stereo 
sound system, and most interesting 
of all, a floppy disk drive 
as well as a cartridge 
port. The floppy 
drive was able to 
be read constant- 
ly, piping data to 
the processor 
even in the 
middle of a 
game. , 

How- 
ever, the 
most 
innova- 
tive 
thing 
about the 
Konix was 
its design. 
It was 
called the 
''multisystem" 
because it could 

transform it's shape. One minute it 
had a steering wheel controller, 
then a motorbike handlebars, then 
it was an aeroplane controller. 
There was also a fantastic array of 
promised goodies, including a light- 
ggn and some kind of chair which 
you could sit in for total immerse 
gameplay. 

Konix also had the not inconsid- 
erably talents of Jeff Minter an their 
side. Mr Minier is a gaming legend, 
with titles such as "Attack of the 
Mutant Camels" under his belt. 
Welt, under his Afghan more like. 

Sadly the Konix never made it. 
Developers were unhappy at the 



amount of RAM on board, only 
128K, which meant animation and 

other effects were difficult. The 
floppy disk just couldn't provide the 
data needed to make animation 
effects work, and there was noth- 
ing for it but to increase the 
amount of on-board memory. 

Unfortunaiely all this was going 
on when the price of memory was 
extremely high, and the cost Of 
doubling it to a more reasonable 

256K had to be met from the 
profit margin. Konix 
were set on bringing 
in the console 
price under 
£190. 

The inevitable 
delays of pro- 
ducing a com- 
plicated; 
system, and 



Camels was one of the only games 
finished, and awesome as it was, it 
wasn't going to be enough to 

launch an entire console. 

Interestingly, Flare created a 
new system which went on to have 
slightly more success. Bet you can't 
guess its name; Jaguar ■ 
John Kennedy 





A Nai| m if 1 1 maUfMkf ! 
▼ ... And it's §M perfete U#. 



f 



i 




a lack of any finished 
third-party software finally did for it. 
and despite the UK press hoping 
and praying, the Multisystem never 
made it to a proper launch- Mutant 



Konix Multisystem specifications 

On-board memory: 256K [in later versions upgrat 
Processor: IB-bit 8086 chip plus a custom 12 MHz ASIC chip 
(includes video generator, colour palette, disk controller. Slitter, ROM, 
fast RAM, 12 MIP Arithmetic and Logic Unit, RISC Digital Signal 
Processor, stereo compact disk DACs and digital and analogue ports 
Graphics; maximum resolution of 512x200 pixels and 16 colours 
Colour palette: 4,096 colours 
Sound: 25 (?| channel stereo CD quality sound 
Display output: Standard TV or RGB composite video 
Sound output: Via TV or through stereo headphone socket 
Software format: Customised S80K 3 5" disks and expansion 
cartridge 




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